The courier. (Lincoln, Neb.) 1894-1903, December 20, 1902, Image 7

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    if
MiMM
THE COURIER
MISS LIPPINCOTT, . . ..
SOME OP LINCOLN'S UNION PLUMBERS.
J
be devoted to a cooking school. Miss
Gould has arranged to hire expert cooks
In Manhattan, who will teach the poor
girls who live near Lyndhurst how to
cook all the delicacies of the season free
of charge. Recently Miss Gould enter
tained the mothers of 200 girls who be
longed to her sewing class, at her man
sion with a supper. Special artists fur
nished music, and each one was pre
sented with a large cake bearing the
words "Mothers Meeting."
Monday evening the Candle-Light club
met at the Lincoln. Judge Roscoe Pound
read a paper on the Jury system. Mr.
Pound reviewed the history of the sys
tem, enumerated its strong and weak
points, and came to the conclusion that
with minor reforms and with a stronger
and more independent bench the Jury
offers the best means yet devised for se
curing substantial Justice. He held that
it Is needed in many cases as a sort of
common sense mediation between stern,
inexorable law and man. In 'the discus
sion which followed the paper there was
substantial agreement especially among
the lawyers, that the bench and bar
ought to be charged with a good share
of the sins commonly charged to the
Jury. A number of lawyers and Judges
from outside the city were the guests
of the club. The paper was generally
spoken of as one of the most brilliant
efforts yet enjoyed by the club.
Speaking of debutantes, a writer in
the New York Tribune offers the follow
ing comments:
"It is sad, but trap, that Intellect and
cultured intelligence cannot be included
among the social assets of a debutante.
In fact, they are more of a hindrance
than a help in her so-called 'success,'
which means that she must have cotillion
and supper parties In plenty for every
function, and be generally admired. This
seems hard and at the same time contra
dictory to the emancipated schoolgirl,
who has always, ever since she can re
member, been urged to study hard, and
told by parents and teachers that it was
all essential to Improve her mind, not
only for the sake of culture in itself,
but also in order to shine in this social
world. .But this world which she en
tered seems to care so little for any
intellectual acquirements, and only to
require of her a capacity for chattering,
amusing gossip, or to be able to toss the
ball of repartee to and from In sprightly
fashion with her partners. In this the
clever, serious minded girl will probably
find that her mental inferiors will great
ly surpass her, and she may have the
mortification of seeing some girl whom
she has always considered quite stupid
suddenly become her social superior, all
because the latter has a superbundance
of unusual spirits and plenty of small
talk on every occasion.
"There Is no doubt that many ex
tremely well brought up girls are so
cially handicapped when they start out
in the world, and it often takes a couple
of seasons before the shy young student
feels at home or happy in the gay world.
'I cannot change suddenly, mamma,'
said one of these poor little social mar
tyrs. 'I have always been brought up
not to talk at the table when I dined
with older people, and now it is impossi
ble for me to rattle on like Molly Chat
terbox, whom you seem to hold up as a
model to me now, although I remember
very well when she came to luncheon
with us a couple of years ago that you
exclaimed after she left: "That child is
perfectly insufferable. So forward and
silly! She has been wretchedly brought
up!" But now, you see, she is quite the
belle, while I, you must admit, am some
what of a wallflower.'
"Later.on the Intellectual girl will have
her innings. Society does not consist of
debutantes' functions, and the winter,
which she deems so Important, and
which in all probability will be a great
disappointment, will soon be over. Little
by little she will learn to adopt herself
to her world and enjoy it. Nevertheless,
she will find that it Is only to the few
that she can safely talk of other things
than social happenings, while the pleas
ure she derives from a highly cultured
mind must either be a purely personal
one or shared only by a few kindred
spirits."
The United Daughters of the Confed
eracy, a society dear to the heart of
the southern women, has now a mem
bership of over thirty thousand and is
rapidly growing. It has chapters riot
alone in cities of the south, but wherever
southern women have gone to dwell. A
chapter with thirty charter members
was recently organized in Kansas City,
and promises to become a potent factor
in exclusive social circles in that city.
In plan and methods of government It
Is something like the Daughters of the
American Revolution, and has one great
parent society with divisions in many
states. Mrs. James A. Rounsaville of
Rome, Georgia, Is president of the gen
eral society. Mrs. "Stonewall" Jackson
Is honorary president.
During the war between the States,
'61-65, many societies of southern women
were formed to minister to the Aces
sltles of soldiers in field and hospital,
these being generally known as "Sol
diers' Aid Societies." Immediately fol
lowing the close of the war one of these
societies, in Columbus, Georgia, deter
mined to perpetuate its organization as
a memorial. It published and sent forth
GROUP OF LINCOLN GARMENT WORKERS UNION.
1. Tillle Martinson. 2. Hulda Nelson. 3. Shearley Dyer. 4. Mary Hudson. 5.
Carrie Hockenbary. 6. Lucy Embody. 7. Jennie Saylor. 8. Mrs. Estes. 9. Hazel
Kent. 10. Neva Haney.
Studio. Room 66. Bruwnell Block
Lessons In Drawing, Painting, Pyrog
raphy. Wood Carving, Improved China
Kiln. China decorated or fired. ""
Studio open Monday, Tuesday,. Thurs
day, Friday, 2 to 5 p. m.. and Saturday.
9 to u a. m.
J. R. HAGGARD, M. D..
LINCOLN. NEB.
Office, 1100 O street Rooms 212, 213, 214.
Richards Block; Telephone 636.
Residence. 1310 G street; Telephone K984
M. B. KETCHUM, M. D Phar. D.
Practice limited to EYE. EAR, NOSE.
THROAT. CATARRH. AND FITTING
8PECTACLES.
Hours. 9 to 5; Sunday, 1 to 2 JO.
Rooms 313-314 Third Floor Richards
Block. Lincoln, Neb. Phone 848.
DRS. WENTE & HUMPHREY,
DENTISTS
OFFICE. ROOMS 28, 27, 1. BROWNBLL
BLOCK,
137 South Eleventh Street
Telephone, Office, 630.
C. W. M. POYNTER, M. XX,
PHYSICIAN AND
SURGEON.
Phones: Residence, L92S: Office. L102L
1222 O Street.
DR. BENJ. F. BAILEY,
Residence. Sanatorium. Tel. 617.
At office. 2 to 4; Sundays, 12 to 1 p. m.
DR. MAY L. FLANAGAN,
Residence, 621 So. 11th. Tel. 9SI.
At office, 10 to 12 a. m.; 4 to 6 p. m.
Sundays, 4 to 4:30 p. m.
Office. Zehrung Block, 141 So. 12th. Tel. 613
swu&ri&rijhi
Cycle Photographs
Athletic rnotograpns
Photographs of Babies
Photographs of Groups
Exterior Views
The Photographer
129 South Eleventh Street
PRIVATE AND PUBLIC
Library books
BOUND IN A SUBSTAN
TIAL MANNER AT FAC
TORY PRICES BY . . .
South Platte Publishing Co.,
Paper Box Makers.
Tenth and N Streets, Lincoln, Neb.
FREIGHT PATO ONE WAY.
Many Things
are Dear . . .
But the dearest of all Is inferior
work. My
PAPER HANGING,
PAINTING, and
INSIDE DECORATING
will always bear the closest un
spectlon.
PRICES THAT PLEASE.
CARL MYRER
2612 Q STREET
f
Phone S23S