The courier. (Lincoln, Neb.) 1894-1903, September 28, 1901, Page 12, Image 12

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    THB COURIER.
12
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When
Yoii
Trayel
When you travel to the mountains, !
the lakes or the sea you can add to
the comfort and pleasure of vour trip :
by starting with the right sort of;
trunks and traveling Dags, we nave
trunks and bags that are equal to every emergency off
a long journey by sea or land.
MIfefcBR & PAINEl
I i
iMUMIMMI IM II1MH I IMMIIIHMll
IMwIMvflwMMMMwMsW
Whose work with Miss Rivett is favorably known, will
continue to do Manicuring", Shampooing", Hairdressing-, J
and will give treatment o scalp diseases. Switches 2
and pompadours made to order and - all kinds of hair 2
work carefully done.
-2
143 So. I2tlx. OrelefribLOXLO 38.
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MIMMIMMIMMaMM
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LAWYERS--
Send The Courier y our liEGAl, notice.
hies are kept in fare proof buildings.
CHEAPER THAN EVER
loraflo and gtal?
Daily Tunc 18th to
Sept. 10th, 1901..
..VIA THE.
GEEAT
BOCK ISLAND
BOUTE
Round TMp Rates
From Missouri River Points to Denver,
Colorado Springs and Pueblo,
- x July I to 9 A-t Q June 18 to 30
5JL) Sept. 1-10 LV July IO-Auk-31
Similar reduced Kates on same dates to
other Colorado and Utah Tontist Points.
.Bates. from, other points on Bock Island
Boats proporiiaMtely lover on same
dates of sale. Return limit Oct. 31, 1901.
THE SUPERB TRAIN,
Colorado Flyer
Leare Kansas City daily at 6 JO p. m.,
Omaha at 5:20 p. m., SUoe at 5:00 p. m.,
armies' Dearer 11 :00 a. m Colorado Sp'gs
t Jfanitoa) 10 J5 a. m., Pueblo 1150 a. m.
Write for details and Colorado literature.
E. W. Thompson, A. G. P. A.
Topeka, Kane.
John Sebastian, G. P. A., Chicago.
'H. W. BROWN
Druggist and
C Bookseller.
? MTtattlng'a
V Fine Stationery
-and
Calling Cards
5 127 So.Bleventh Street.
A PHONE 6
SADDLES
HORSE COLLARS'
lsjp
1ST NHTHli"Bl
. . . of LINCOLN, NEBR. . . .
Capital $ 200,00000
Surplta and Profits . 5455.08
Deposits .... 2,4o0252.18
J J J
S. H. Burnham, A. T. Sawyer,
President. Vice President
H. S. Freeman, CasMrr,
B. B. Evans, Frank Parks,
AsA Cashier. At Cashier.
UNIJED STATES DEfOSIJOJW.
ASKyouftDEALtRTosHowTHfM
I ft DEALER JO
BEFORE, YOU BUY.
tANUACTURCD BY
HARPHAM BR0S.C0.
Lincoln, Neb.
J. E. HAGGARD. M. D.
Lincoln, Nebr.
Office 1100 O Street, Rooms 212, 213,
214, Richards' Block. Telephone 535
Residence 1310 G St. Telephone K984;
binding them together in a dainty little
booklet -all by hand, as Elbert Hnbbard
would aay.
Tbia special magazine- contained two
continued stories both by well-known
writers and also a history in monthly
installments. When one of the stories
was completed she took the numbers it
appeared in and removed the pages of
the story by bending up .the wires at
the back and slipping off the leaves.
The story was then all placed-togetber
and bound byyi wire run through the
holes already in the leave (in place of
wire, an invisible hairpin will do quite
as well).
Of course, many pages of the story
were printed on sheets on the other aide
of whicbTwae material not wanted'in'the
book. But the pages not belonging to
the story were easily covered by illus
trationspictures which had been need
as frontispieces or at the beginning of
chapters. If there should not be
enough of these pictures for the space
to be covered, other magazine pictures,
not originally intended for the illustra
tion of the story but yet appropriate,
might be found; or, failing that, some
short poem which has appealed to the
bookmaker. In pasting leaves together,
fastening in a few places will be suffic
ient and more artistic, for if the leaves
are pasted all over, they will be sure to
wrinkle somewhere and have a gener
ally mussy look. All this pasting should
be done, of course, before the parts are
bound together.
Then comes the cover, where one may
display much or little artistic skill.
Gray, brown or other colored cardboard
with the title letters in a contrasting
color is effective, and the cardboard
covers can bo fastened on the back of the
book by passe-partout binding; or, if Jhe
book is small, by a silk cord passed
through the hole. Anyone who can
paint a little will, of course, see other
-ways to decorate each a cover. Bind
ings still prettier and easier to fasten
on are made from brown linen or from
chamois, the chamois lettered in gilt or
painted and the linen painted or em
broidered. But the ways of covering
such books are endless, and will readily
suggest themselves.
Next Christmas almost anyone would
be glad to receive one of the new novels,
daintily bound, or perhaps a collection
of short stories, or a history really valu
able to the student.
It is unnecessary to speak of the
beautiful pictures, colored and other
wise, which may be taken from maga
zines and mounted on cardboard and
passe-partout. They are often as stun
ning as posters, which we pay a dollar
for at Christmas time. Magazines which
contain pictures of actors and actresses
can be put to good use in this work of
bookmaking, for souvenir books of stage
artists are in great demand nov, and one
made at home is quite as interesting
and much prettier than those sold in the
theatres or book stores.
SMITH'S DOG.
(Being documents found on the per
son of the late John Smith).
I.
Bought of Barke & Bight, dog fan
ciers One bull terrier pup $75
Received payment. B. 4 B. "
II.
Mr. John Smith Dear Sir: Please
call at my office and settle for two An
gora cats, the property of my wife prior
to their destruction. Thomas Jones.
III.
Mr. John Smith Dear Sir: I can not
afford to feed that bull pup on Plymouth
Rock chickens. You will confer a favor
on me by sending me your check for
f .50. Henry Johnson.
IV.
Mr. John Smith My Dear Mr. Smith:
I assure you, sir, that your build. ha
buried nothing in my yard, and 1 wish
you would 'endeavor to dissuade him
from digging, it up, every day in sosrch
of certain bones which he seems t be
lieve he has concealed under my ihp
beds. I am sorry to have to do i but
I am obliged to enclose a bill just seat
me by my gardener. Sincerely yours.
Henrietta Brown.
Digge fc Grubb, landscape garden
ers, in account with Mrs. Henrietta
Brown Replanting tJlip bed and
sodding eight square yards or
lawn s s
V.
I. Slaughter, butcher, in account with
John Smith To dog meat ?15
VI.
L. Hassenrod Emerson, veterinary
surgeon, in account with John
Smith To curing one bull pup of
distemper Jiio
To curing one bull pup of mange 25
Total $r0 'f
VII.
Mr. John Smith Dear Sir: Aa that
.belligerent animal you keep around
your place will not allow the carrier to
approach your premises, I hereby notify
you that yon must hereafter get your
mail at the poetoffice. Yours truly,
Henry Thompson, P. M.
VIII.
John Smith, Esq. My Dear Smith: I
know that a warm friendship has always
existed between us, but I can not con
ceive how any man in his right mind
can allow such a villainous whelp as
that of yours to remain around his
house, and I must insist that you pay
me the full amount of my fine bird dog,
.jwhich is now lying at the point of death
'as the result of an encounter with your
cut -the last time he followed me to
your house. He came home three days
after I lost him, and if he ever does re
cover he is ruined forevermore. I don't
want to quarrel with you, Smith, but
this is a serious matter, and, while no
money can replace my fine old Brutus, L J
feel that it will be only justice for you f
to pay me $250, which is the price I paid
for the dog two years ago.
Charles Kaniae.
IX.
John Smith Sir: Complaint corao3
to this office that you are violating city
ordinance 41,143, which makes it a mis
demeanor to allow a vicious dog to rue
at large. 1 shall be obliged to send a
policeman to your neighborhood to in
vestigate this matter if you do not im
mediately take steps to abate this nuis
ance. The maximum fine in your case
is $100, er fifty days' imprisonment.
Respectfully,
Robert Full, Chief of Police.
X.
Mr. John Smith My Dear Mr. Smith:
The widow Brown is mourning the lofs
of her four-year old child, which, while
piaiug qbst your nouse yesieraay, wbb . i
seized
(Mr. Ssaith- evidently destroyed the
remainder of this letter, as the foregoing
was all of it that could be found on his
person.
XI.
Hard & Ware, firearms, sold to John
Smith One Smith 4 Wesson revol
ver, 48 cal fW
(Extract from morning paper.)
John Smith, a well known resident of
the city, committed suicide last nigut
by shooting himself through the head
Mr. Smith was a man of means, of hap
py domestic surroundings, and tbe
motive of his rash act is shrouded '
mystery. Portland Oregonian.
Cholly Why so quiet, Miss Grace?
Grace (lightly) Oh, I was buildic.,'
castles in the air.
Cholly What did you use for a corr t
stone?
Grace A solitaire. Town Topics.