The courier. (Lincoln, Neb.) 1894-1903, July 27, 1901, Page 12, Image 12

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THE COURIER.
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MIMMI II Mill I Ml Ml I HUM I II III
When
You
When you
the lakes or
TVorol tne comfort and pleasure or your trips
I IO.VCI ty starting with the right sort of
trunks and traveling bags. We have
trunks and bags that are equal to every emergency off
a long journey by sea or land.
MII9I0ER& PAINE
III II Ml III III I II HI Hit II IT
5(
Health
Activity
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WDCOCXD 3mmMfmMmMm990998BGGemmQ
f AUVCDC Send
LAW 1 E. l" files
CHEAPER THAN EVER
. TO-
(sOlOPaflO and Jsjtalj
Daily June JSth to
Sept. 10th, 1901.-
..VIA THK..
GREAT
ROCK ISLAND
ROUTE
Round Trip Ra.es
From Missouri River Points to Denver,
Colorado Springs and Pueblo,
Ai- July 1 to 9 fi-i O Jnne l8 to 3
$10 Sept. 1-10 $ly July 10-AuB.31
Similar reduced Rates on same dates to
other Colorado and Utah Tourist Points.
Bates from other points on Rock Island
Route proportionately lower on same
dates of sale. Return limit Oct. 31, 1901.
THE SUPERU TRAIN,
Colorado Flyer
Leaves Kansas City daily at 6:30 p. m.,
OmahK at "5:20 P- nv. SUloe at 5:00 p. m.,
arriving Denver 11 :00 a . m.. Colorado isp grs
lManitou)10:35a. m., Pueblo 11:50 a. m.
Write for details and Colorado literature.
E. W. Thompson, A. G. P. A.
Topeka, Kane.
John Sebastian, G. P. A., Chicago.
. . . THIS
101
. . . of LINCOLN, NEBR
j J Jt
Capital 5 200,000.00
Surplus and Profits . 5455.08
Droits .... 2,48052.18
j j jt
S. H. Burnham, A. I. Sawyer,
President. Vice President.
H.S. Freeman, Cashier,
H. B. Evans, nk , .
Ass't Cashier. Ass't Cashier.
UN1TD STATESDEJ0S1J0FY.
FIT
NAI
BAN
.'MMIlMCIIIIIIM
travel to the mountains,
the sea you can add to
Bl
and Happiness go hand in hand,
is contagious, and imparts
1 1 Hf
Health and Wealth in this beautiful land.
Convey it to others by actively engaging
In beautifying the woman and strength
ening the man.
Thus, using an Electric Massage Ex
erciser, . A Home Training Outfit, or a Fountain
Bath Brush;
Prices $1.00 to $5.00. For sale by
I. K. ALMOND,
1106 0 STREET. L1HG0LN, NEBR.
he Courier your legal notices
are kept in fire proof buildings.
6
I
H. W. BROWN
Druggist and
Bookseller.
wntttn a:
Fine Stationery
and
Calling Cards
c
6
J 127 So.Bleventh Street. J
A PHONE 68 A
HORSE COLLARS
lB;
e
ASKyi
OURDEALERTOS
BEFORE YOU BUY.
MANUFACTURED By
HARPHAM BROS.CO.
Lincoln, Neb.
J.K.HAGGAED.M.D.
L,itiooln, Xetor.
Office U00O Street, Rooms 2J2, 2J3,
2J4, Richards' Block. Telephone 535
Residence 1310 G St. Telephone K984
HHJl
HOWTHfM
A DOMESTIC MYSTERY.
It has always been a mystery to me
why young married people bo often be
gin life in a boarding house. I have
sometimes wondered whether this cus
tom partakes of the nature of a disease,
or whether it is simply a fad, a practice
which has grown to be considered
"swell" in this part of the country.
Certain it is that for two-thirdB of
the newly-married couples, or for those
whose wedding day is approaching, a
sign of "Rooms and Board" has much
the same attraction that a magnet has
for a needle, or a Waldorf-Astoria crest
for a monogram fiend.
If the simple securing of a place to
eat and Bleep be all that is desired, then
this boarding house system is admirably
fitted to supply the want: but when one
considers the many advantages to be
enjoyed in a private home, it is a wonder
that boarding houses are not given over
to the exclusive accommodation of
bachelor maids and unmarried men.
In a boarding house, particularly in a
large one, a person rapidly loses his in
dividuality; his horizon becomes nar
rowed, and soon he finds his thoughts
revolving around a very limited orbit of
eating and drinking and Bleeping. The
very furniture in a rented suite of rooms
iB characterless, and resists all efforts
at home-life arrangement by the most
enthusiastic bride who ever pinned up a
poster. Why should she plan and de
vise schemes for rearranging her rooms,
when they persist in looking the same
in spite of all her efforts? ThuB many
of her housewifely instincts lie dormant,
and she is driven for entertainment to
the shops, .the library ,and the concert
halls, and she may even develop into a
matinee fiend!
The husband may find diversion dur
ing the day at his place of business; but
when be comes home at night he misses
that freedom from restraint which can
be secured only in a home of hiB own.
The condition of the family purse
may not warrant the hiring of a servant,
and the young wife may not be an adept
in the culinary art; but a beginning at
housekeeping must naturally be made
some time, and what time so propitious
hb the Bret weeks of married life, when
love will sweeten the most unsavory
dish, and when the delightful table
talk will make up for many defects in
the cuisine?
I am convinced that this forlorn and
homeles condition of boarding is respon
sible for much of the unbappiness of
married life; it will eventually ruin the
sweetest of tempers, and many a quar
rel and even divorce might have been
avoided in more congenial surroundings.
Hurtful and Helpful Giving.
"When I was trying hard to get
through the state university on very
little money," writee Mrs. Cynthia
Westover Alden, the president-general
of the International Sunshine society,
in the Ladies' Home Journal for August,
"one day an old-time friend looked me
over, and taking out a ten dollar bill,
handed it to me saying: 'You actually
look as if you did not get half enough to
eat. Take this money and straighten
up a bit. Don't forget to pay it back to
me when you can. I don't believe in
giving money to anybody.' Now, I was
not an object of charity, though I was
in need of Sunshine. I put the bill
away and cried as if my heart would
break. After waiting some days I Bent
the same ten dollars back, saying I was
glad I could return it to her so soon.
To this day I bear of her telling how
she helped me financially when I was
"hard up."
"Another woman, that same week,
asked me why I did not .take my meate
at the restaurant where most of the
students took theirs. I replied that it
was a little too expensive for me. The
next day I was called in by the proprie
tor of the restaurant, and asked it I
could find time to look over the books of
the concern and verify the work done
by some one else, aud if 1 would take
the pay out in meal tickets. 1 thought
it merely a bit of luck that had come in
my way. But at the close of the terra
the proprietor told me that my friend
had paid for my meal tickets. Did the
kindness offend me? 1 cried just aa
hard as I had cried over the ten dollar
bill, but it was a different sort of a cry."
AS TO MUSICIANS AND HIRSUTE
ADORNMENTS.
Through the columns of a Pittsburg
paper the world is informed that a young
lady, a member of the Castle Square
Opera Company, now playing there, is
blessed by nature with 200 miles of
golden hair. With mathematical ex
actness ''the number of hairs to the
square inch of head has been counted,
and the hair is five feet in length, so it
is estimated that if the silken strands
were laid end to end two hundred miles
would be measured."
The value of this information is less
ened by the failure of the writer to state
whether there is a scientific reason for
connecting the abundance of the young
lady's hair with her musical proclivities.
On this, point statistics are sadly needed.
Everyone knows that pianists usually
have long, fine, silky manee, inclined to
curliness, and that the violinist, with an
equal abundance of head covering, is
commonly adorned with a chevelure of
thick, coarse, straight locks. The in
jurious effect on the hair of the playing
of brass instruments is established, and
the baldness of the trumpeter is a joke
in every orchestra. But these scattered
observations have never been subjected
to proper scientific ecrutiny, and the
Einger and his (or her) hair have been left
almost entirely out of the question. It
may be suggested thatlhe comic opera
singer is chronically"baldand ihatltip
interpreter of tragic roles in opera has
abundant hair, usually coarse and grow
ing low over the brow. But in the first
case the baldness may be due to the
funny man's humorous tendencies rath
er than his singing, and in the latter
some inquiry must be instituted into the
habits of life of grand opera singers, so
as to eliminate other factors from the
problem.
Then there is the question whether
there is Borne scientific reason back of
the convention which ordains that the
bass shall wear a flowing beard, the
baritone a closely trimmed Van Dyke at
most, while the tenor is permitted noth
ing more than the lightest of mous
taches. But this is getting in too deep;
the questions raised call for a new
Teufelsdrockh, and a Philosophy of Hair.
Concert-Goer.
Indian Educators
A congress of Indian Educators will
be held in Buffalo commencing July
fifteenth and lasting five days. The
membership of this organization num
bers several thousands and is drawn
chiefly from the ranks of the teachers
in the Government Indian schools, the
various religious and private schools,
and from the large number of educators
throughout the land who are watching
with deep interest the progress of teach
ing among the Indian tribes.
GOOD CHEER.
Have you had a kindness shown ?
Pass it on .
'Twos not given for you alone
Pass it on .
Let it travel down the years ,
Let it wipe another's tears ,
Till in heaven the deed appears ,
Pass it on .