The courier. (Lincoln, Neb.) 1894-1903, June 17, 1899, Image 1

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VOL . XIV., NO. XXIV.
ESTABLISH KD IN 1880
PHICE HIVE CEN
LINCOLN, NBBR.. SATURDAY, JUNE 17, 1801).
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Communications, to rocoivo attontion, must
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publication if advisable
Justice to the Living.
Throughout a typo written letter of
something more than three pages, of
date .Tune 5th, addressed t' the editor
of tills journal, Cndot Taylor of Oma
ha winces under a just and well
merited rebuke administered through
these columns two weeks ugo. He
suggests that the article written on
Decoration Day, the truth of which
lie does not deny, had for its object
the renewal of a controversy which
lie writes "had been settled by the
parties interested.'' Not at all. The
object was to Inform the reading pub
lic who were somo of the principal
actors and the part they took in an
unwarranted and cowardly attack
upon a bravo soldier then engaged in
tlio discharge of his duty, and in in
sisting upon the adoption by the leg
- islature of a resolution of condemna
tion without a word of evidence in
support nf charges and that without
giving him an opportunity to be
heard. It was intended that the
future political career of those actors
should bo elTected by tlio acts recited.
A further object was to furnish a
mirror in which the parties des
ignated from the eminence of Infamy
upon which their voluntary acts in
advocating and securing condemna
tion without a hearing had placed
them, might view themselves. Cadet
Taylor lias taken his view and is mad
ai the mirror.
The party most deeply Interested In
the controversy which is said to havo
been settled was the late command
ing officer of tlio First Nebraska.
The resolution which Cadet Taylor
d in Its ho caused to bo Introduced in
the legislature had for Its purpose the
disgracing of thai officer and li is re
moval from the command or the
regiment because of alleged un
worthy conduct. The adoption of
that resolution was a matter of pub
lie record. In the settlement of such
a controversy certainly the officer was
deeply interested. When and where
was the alleged settlement made? In
making it who represented the absent
olllcerand whotlie "Thurston Rifles
Associate Members'' of which Cadet
Taylor claims to be president? That
a resolution condemning the action of
the officer was presented to the leg
islature is admitted. That in advo
cating the adoption of that resolu
tion charges were made against the
officer which if true would have pre
vented ills farther promotion and
caused ills discharge in disgrace from
the army is true. That no oppor
tunity to he heard in ills own defense
either in person or by representative
was afforded the soldier charged with
offense is conceded. That a motion to
defer action on the resolution until
the charges could be investigated and
the truth ascertained was voted down,
will not be denied. And now it is
said the controversy was settled by
the parties Interested. In that set
tlement and as a part thereof did the
commanding officer of the First Nc
braskn indicate or agree that expung
ing tlio record of the injustice done
him was all that he required? What
were the terms of this settlement and
where may a record of it be found?
In the letfer above referred to
.Cadet Taylor says: "I did what I
considered to bo my duty in behalf of
the private soldiers, in answer to the
appeal of the fathers and mothers of
boys 10,000 miles away from home."
And this man's conception of duty
led him to make an attack from the
rear upon the army of hio country in
time of war by endeavoring to secure
the removal from that army, when it
faced the enemy, of one of its most
efficient and bravest officers who later
fell in battle when leading a charge.
An officer whose deatli caused
bearded men in Ills command to weep.
How many fathers and mothers of
members of the First Nebraska are
willing to admit that they appealed
to Cadet Taylor, President of the
Thurston Rifles Associate Members''
to secure the condemnation of the
Colonel of that regiment without a
hearing? Let them stand up and be
counted.
The letter referred to contains this
Interrogatory: "What personal in
terest havo you in the First Nebraska
ttiat qualifies you to sit in judge
ment?" Is It necessary that tho
editor of the paper which contains
these observations shall have a rela
tive in the First Nebraska in order to
qualify her to criticize the public
acts of the Nebraska legislature or to
denounce the cowardice of one who
by false representations induces those
acts? If an officer of that regiment
should murder one of the men under
his command Is the right of criticism
of that act reserved to those who havo
relatives in tho regimoiitv The In
terest which the editor lias In tho
First Nebraska that qualifies her to
sit In Judgement upon the action of
the legislature is tlio Interest which
every lover of Justice lias in Justice.
Jt is the natural abhorrence, which
every decent person feels for tho
acts of which Cadet Taylor ad
mits he has been guilty. To quote
farther from this letter: "Let me say
to you madam, that we do not recog
nize your right to criticize unless
you have a family interest." How
presumptuous it is in one not having
a "family Interest'' to criticize the
acts of the Nebraska legislature.
Repeatedly in this letter reference
is made to the sons of the writer who
arc members of the First Nebraska.
The affection expressed for them is
commendable but it is somewhat re
markable that one possessing such
powerful parental aircction should
have been so regardless of the affec
tion which another father had for his
son. Did it never occur to Cadet
Taylor that Colonel Stotscnburg had a
father and that the reputation and
good name of his son was dear to him?
When that father wrote a letter to
the State senate and requested an in
vestigation of tlio charges made
against his son did Cadet Taylor
Urge any member or the senate to
take the necessary steps to grant the
request?
1 forbear reference to those por
tions of the letter which refer to the
bravery of tho First Nebraska. Tho
bravery of the regiment as a regimen;
as well as its efficiency was born
largely of tho capability and courage
of its commanding officer whose re
moval was sought to be encompassed
by legislative condemnation at the
behest of the author of the letter to
which reference has been made. The
courage and character of the regi
ment has been proved but it remains
to be seen whether that character and
courage are sufficient to enable it to
withstand the withering blight of a
compliment from those who at
tempted to destroy its efficiency.
Women Sculptors.
The noble head of Mrs. Emma Wll
lard, founder of the Troy Seminary
and one of the first women to promote
the higher education of women has
been modeled by Mrs. Enid Vandell
The bust will be placed in the State
library at Albany, and Is presented
by the Emma Willard association to
the State library. Tiie sculptor is
the first woman allowed to become a
member of the National Sculptor's
Association. Several of tlio illus
trated weeklies havo published pic
tures of the bust. I would ail
cavillers at woman's work and genius,
all rhymesters of the new woman, all
Harry Thurston Fecks and all unin
spired, jealous scribblers who dread
tlio Increasing competition from those
whom they inconsistently argue, have
no duties to tho race except that of
renewing and roaring It, might study
this bust or picture. Hroadly
modeled, tho bust hears tho marks or
an Inspired thumb. The grace,
strength, and reposo of tho face sug
gest George Washington us ho might
have looked when he llrst fell In love
or as lie might have looked If tho mes
sengerwlth beautiful feet had ap
proached him with tho tidings of a
now horn son.so suffused with tender
ness and fnlth and fulfilled hope is
this woman's face. It pleases all tho
women of the world who belle vo that
woman has an intellect and thatsomo
womcn-lmvo genius to bo so ovor
whelmingly confirmed by portrait
busts such as this by Ktilri Yandell or
tlioso UessloPottor makes.Thoy are un
answerable and ir thospiterul penny-a-liners
and book reviewers or Grub
street aro depresslngly inslstant on
tho inferiority or women and her ri
diculous aspirations to accomplish
the end or the road she has started to
travel they are discouraged liereoy,
Higher Education
The State university address de
livered last week by Frcsldent Cyrus
W. Northrup was a surprise to those
who havo been brougln up to believe
that tiie education or the masses is
the answer to the political and social
problems that no nation or com
munity has yet answered. Rctwecn
socialism that weakens self reliance,
on the one hand, and unrestricted
individualism on tlio other which
giyes tho clever, the unscrupulous or
tho rich an unfair advantago over
tiie stupid, the scrupulous or the poor,
there is doubtless a system or theory
of association which reconciles liberty
with restriction but nobody has dis
covered It. Not Mr. Bryan nor Pro
fessor Herronnor President McKlnley,
and tho last does not pretend that he
has.
President Northrup thinks that the
education our country needs is one
which will fit the farmers, mechanics
and professional men to think and
vote on the questions of civil govern
ment as well as to plow, run
machinery and practice medicine,
law or theology. Tho only excuse tho
state has for taxing every body to
provide the children of a few with a
higher education Is that these few
raise tlio average and return more
than the value of their education to
the state; that in effect, a diploma
received from a state institution is a
promissory note in which the holder
promises to pay to the state (time not
specified) the value of four years' in
struction, in philosophy, chomlstry,
biology, mathematics, dead and mod
ern languages, history, literature and
in all tlio other knowledge slowly ac
cumulating since tho discovery of
writing. If the holder of such a di
ploma does not pay back to the state a
devoted citizenship, then lie Is in
solvent and becomes a dead loss to tho
state and tho system is discredited
For Instance, when u university