The courier. (Lincoln, Neb.) 1894-1903, November 26, 1898, Image 5

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THE COURIER.
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Fitzfierald Dru Qoods Go.
10881080 O At LInooln, Nebr.
The place where you get $1.25 worth of Dry Goods
' for 100 Cents'.
Monday morning at 8 o'clock we place on sale 1000
of fancy colored silks worth 83c, 89c, 98c, $1.25 $1.50
a yard. All will go for 69c.
Linings Free W"Ai E" N
elt res$ gattorn.
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r0 A DKESS PATTERN
LININGS FREE
6 yard fancy skirting 90c
1-3 yard good Yelxeteen 30c
2 yards good selesia ,30c
1 yard all lines canvas .... 30c
$L90
6 yards imported French Pop
lin cloth,chacgeablecolor,900
6 yards silk and wool novel
ties, French cloth 1900
6 yards eilk and wool Baya
dere stripe 1000
4.98 A DRESS PATTflRN
LININGS FREE.
6 yard good cambric 30c
1-3 y?rd goods relveteen .... 20c
2 yards goodselesia 30c
yards all linen can?is 30c
11.10
6 yards Bayadere stripes, all
woo), plain colors 16.00
5 yards imported noTelties.
good styles 17.50
6 yards covert Baitings, all
wool, plain colors 1650
$5.08 A DRESS PATTERN
6 yards good cambric 30c 7
1 3 yard good velveteen arc
2 yards goods elesia 30c
lllvards all linen canvas.... 30c
tUO
6 yards French Poplin, new
ccloriogB, new blues. S7X0
o yarns impurieu buiuujjd, at .
wool, good weight 86.00 7
6 yards ttengaune corae, Diue,
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brown and green $7.00 j
13.85 A DRESS PATTERN
LININGS FREE.
6 yards good cambric 30c
1-3 yard good velveteen 20c
2 yards good aileeia COc
1 yards all linen canvas.... 30c
8U0
7 yards wool checked 8uiting.tl.55
7 yards Jamestown suitings.
email checks 9100
7 yards Jamestowm Bayadere
stripes, brown, blue, green. $4.00
7 yds Bilk thread Jamestown $4.00
CIvOAK ElPA:RrJfcENTP
We can fit-you in any kind of a garment, giving- -
ityle, quality and low prices at the same time.
you s
ackets, Capes, Reefers and fur garments of all kinds. W
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: NEBRASKA CLUB WOMEN
JKe
; Courier
A STORY Of! THE BLUB JAYS.
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AND
The
Glub Worfai
iZ. FOR
THE COURIER
tgnkirn. reports from VTtTf club in
the state except twoJJJJJMJ
THE CLUB WOMAN
is the beat dub magazine pub-
Hlthftf i.l.l.tfcSst.tjtjjtjJBJBjl
A QUARTER
mors than Ae price of one will
secure both for a year. Address
either !"? rwjsjt j js.rf.jt j jtot
THE COURIER, Lincoln, Nebr.
THE CLUB OMAN, Boston,
MaacachtaKttsJM.AAAJMj.
4
$1.25
ucaaaaacattaacaaaaaaatttacc
JMCa)BJSJBJBBVw "
Don't forget that the freshest fruits and vegetables are
! ?he healthiest, especially at this time of the year. Al
ways to be had at
e. m. SFnrz
GOOD LUCK GROCERY
f ,mT ttTmrYNrrc 626.- 1107 U STKUiJSX.
I ni iniitii(3DiJwnrinrnffrgf "'"r"
but when you buy or sell stoves or furniture see
VAN ANDEL, THE SECOND HAND DEALER j
132 ooutn xenxn 01. j. 11" -
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There was trouble in the family of
Mrs. Ble Jay. 'Four discontented,
disobedient young birds sat on a branch,
chattering their complaints in shrill,
rasping tone. And all because break
fast had not suited them!
They were plump and hea'thy but
hungry. The poor, tired, little mother
had said they must toon learn to fly and
Hod their own fruit and insects. This
day she had been out since dawn, hunt
ing dainties for her offspring; and had
Sown so tar and made bo many tripsin
the heat that she was wellnigh ex
hausted. Besides she had had as yet no break
fast for bert elf. Four ravenous mouths
had clamored for each morsel which she
brought with her.
Now her patience was exhausted.
"Henceforth you must fly, and feed
yourselves!'
Four Beared voices shrieked out, "We
shall fall, and the white cat with the
fearful eyes wi 1 eat us."
Mrs. Jay had told them of this cat
who lived in the grounds and lingered
about their tree. Now she grimly re
plied, "That is your outlook," and hit
the nearest bird with her strong bill. It
was so unexpected that he fell from his
parch, and gave himralf up for lost.
Somehow or other he did not know
how his wings spread gently and the
little body floated in the air.
What a delightful sensation. lie
he'Id his breath in ecstacy, while the
soothing, swinging motion wafted him
near a lower branch where he rested.
"Why, brothers, it is easy to fly," he
called up but they were already floating
near him. The mother had pushed
them all from the branch. One almost
missed his footing when alighting, and
might have fallen on the ground.
The others chirped encouragingly, but
no one remembered the cat.
"Let's do it again," they cried, "this
is more fun than sitting 00 that tire
some branch."
Mother Blue Jay called sharply for
them to be careful, and not to forget
the cat, asleep in the grass, who was
waiting to devour little birds.
But they cocked their tutted crests to
one side most disrespectfully andBcorned
the warning. This is what one of. them
sang. The others joined in the re
"Who cares for the cat with the awful I
eye
And the dreadful claws?" "Not I, not I."
"If she try to our branch so high,
We will 3trike with our bills from above
up there
At her greeny eyes with the frightful
glare,
And pull from her head a tuft of bair.
For what care we for a greeny glare.
Or clawy claws thit can tear and tear.
Now we can fly, we can fly, we can flj ?"
The white cat asleep in the weeds,
where the long grasses swayed in the
wind, heard and smiled as she turned
over toward the tree. The fur on her
face hid the smile, She had Been and
eaten many a boastful bird. Now she
slept with her eyes-closed? Well, the
foolish birds would have thought so
could they have feen her, but the leaves
were thick on the branches, and the
branches, and the weeds and grasses
bent over the cat she could not be
seen. Her eyes were shut, all but a
tiny line through which she watched
while she dreamed.
The birds flew lower to ayoung cherry
tree. They wondered that, their mother
had not made them understand that
flying was easier than sitting 00 a. limb;
you had bat to open you wings and it
was done.
Yrn see they had only down hill.there
would be the tedious return to make
after awhile. They played on the little
low cheery tree, from there hopped to
low wooden fence.
Mother Blue Jay called, "Come back
to the tree!" But the leader scornfully
sang, "Who cares for the cat with the
glaring eye?" And they all replied,
"Not J, not I."
The sorrowful little mother flew
nearer. They now playing in the grass.
A motionless body crouched low in
weeds, breathless, expectant.
The birds tried short flights, and on
each return to the ground, approached
nearer the rank growth of gras3 and
weeds,
A sudden spring scatsered them. The
untried wings were not need to upward
flying,
Two birds aimed for the branches of
the little fruit tree and found a resting
place; one reached a lower limb of the
tall shelter of the nest, bnt one how it
happen d, who can say? flurried and
fluttering, whirled upward, lost his foot
ing and tell. A sharp claw entered the
tBeGSRilgboatTiewckTlSTy
weight flattAsed the pretty tkrkwksfs,
and be lay lifeless.
The other birds meekly followed their
saothr back to the branch mm Mm
nest, and gaxed skywards, so as aet te
see the blue and white feathers wit
tered oa the grass,
The leader shook bis head with brav
ado and tried to croak his new soar,
"Who cares for. the cat with the clawy
eyes, and the greeny claws?" but he
could not even get it right.
The other birds moaned, "Don't, we
shall cry,' and each one cuddled closer
to the mother and whispered, "We are
so scared. We want to mind, please tell
us what to do."
Mother Blue Jay was sorry fer their
frkfht and did not scold. "Only ."she
said, "in the future be sure to fly up
wards without stopping to look or argue
when I say 'Beware!'"
Then she crooned them to sleep with
this little song:
Little birdlings in the nest.
Go to rest, go to rest,
Tuck your heads 'neath mother's
breast,
That for little birds is best.
What can hurt my babies three
While with me, while with me?
Sleep, my birdies, on the tree.
Mother's eyes afar can see.
Dainty forms of precious blue.
Safe from view, safe from view,
Brighter than the heaven's hue.
And pretty crested topknots too.
Little fledgelings, nothing fear!
Mother's near, mother's near;
Naught of harm can reach you here.
Hush, my babies, hush each dear.
The sun's tor'id noon rays burned
above the tree tops, but could not pene
trate the thick foliage. All was silent.
The calm of the day and the warmth of
the air, with the song, lulled the tired
little bodies to rest, and soothed three
fluttering hearts. The haunting ogre
of a cat was once more forgotten.
Mother "and birdlings were asleep.
Annie L. Miller in Church Standard.
iMIMI'MMinilllllllllMIIIIII
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MERCY
1
1ST
By wearing- the famous!
Hygienic "Jenness Miller"!
Ishoes!
Best shoes made for wo-:
men, being scientifically
'constructed on purely ana-:
iomical lines they "fit the;
: feet as nature intended."
: As graceful as they are!
comfortable.
: No other dealer in this
city can sell you the "Jen
: ness Miller" shoes or any
i shoes as good. We control
;them. Only
$350
MAYER BROS.
I 112-122 Tenth Street I
mmimmmii 1 iHiiinmn limine
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