The courier. (Lincoln, Neb.) 1894-1903, June 06, 1896, Image 2

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THE COURIER.
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appearance, and has not that Cham
faced, womanish air that many young
preachers fresh from the seminary have.
He has virile energy and he talks of
God and His church and salvation
earnestly and courageously and con
vincingly, impressing his hearers that
he believes every word he says. His
sermons are spiritual sermons and the
people are moved by them. The church
Is filling. Men and women' are going
to hear him who have not been in the
habit of going to church. He is arous
ing Interest in the prayer services. Mr.
Silver speaks with little aid from
notes. He has none of the intonation
common to most Episcopal ministers.
He just preaches, and he has power,
as anyone who hears him will testify.
He will fill Holy Trinity to overflowing
yet.
It is only three weeks now to the
republican state convention and Joe's
combination of Macks and Jacks is
progressing steadily In public disfavor.
The voice of the republican state press
ana the voice of the better element
of republicans have been raised against
the machinations of Joe Hartley's po
litical syndicate, and It is becoming
clearly evident that this is not going
to be a good year for Macks and Jacks.
Republicans are aroused, and there is
a strong sentiment In favor of Inject
ing dignity and ability into the state
campaign. It is felt that in this year
when all the signs point to a revival
of prosperity throughout the state,
when the spirit of loyalty and patriot
ism and state pride is asserting itself
as It has not asserted Itself In years,
when the presidential campaign has
quickened the Impulses of every good
republican, the party In Nebraska Is
not likely to take a step backward and
at the behest of the political syndicate,
manipulated by Joe Slick Hartley,
hand the nominations for governor
and other Important state offices over
to bub whose principal following Is
in the bar rooms and political oil
rooms of the state, men who in no
way represent the sober, respectable,
manly, dignified mass of republican
veters and patriotic, state-loving citi
seas, men -who are mere "Jacks" or
"Masks," teg-rollers and wire pullers.
From the green valleys of Wayne to
the shifting sands of Cheyenne, from
the shaded banks of, the Blue to the
canons of the northern tier, from east
to west and north to south, from the
rank and file of honest, loyal republi
cans everywhere within the state Is
heard the ory. "No hierarchy, no per
petuation in office, no dictation or
slate making by the syndicate." And
when the state convention shall as
semble the delegates will take up this
cry and give it potency. The fact
that Mr. Hartley has evinced such
solicitude as to the succession in the
office of state treasurer has been taken
as particularly significant, and there
is a good deal of speculation going on
that is not markedly complimentary
to the state treasurer. Indeed, it ap
pears that "Joe," who has prided him
self on his oleagenous qualities, has
over reached himself. For the protest
against the combination has, in some
localities, taken the form of a demand,
not only that Mr. McNish shall not
be nominated, but that the nominee
for state treasurer shall be a man
who is pledged to go into office abso
lutely free of all obligations and en
tanglements, whose first duty shall be
to protect the interests of the people
of the state, rattier than the "accom
modation" or service of influential
politicians. When Mr. Bartley went
into the business of establishing a
corner in republican politics he tackled
a dangerous undertaking. The whirl
wind is about his ears now.
Mr. Hartley attempted last week to
bring about his first coup in the In
terest of himself and McNish and the
political syndicate. And he succeeded,
partially. Its importance will dimin
ish as the people come to under tsand
Its true inwardness. A great many
people have been trying to figure out
the exact condition of things in Doug
las, county since the county conven
tion. Mr. Bartley could probably
throw some light on the subject, as he
had as much, if not more, to do with
the consummation of the deal as any
other one man. A large sum of money
was UBed in the attempt to secure a
majority of the county delegation for
Balch and as it is now confidently as
serted that Mr. Bartley will have the
disposal of Mr. Batch's strength In the
Douglas delegation it is not at all
improbable that Mr. Bartley was a
contributor to the Balch fund. The
Douglas delegation, consisting of 116
members, would certainly be a desir
able addition to the McNish boom.
Hut Mr. Willams may have as much
to say about the casting of the Doug
las delegation vote as Mr. Balch, and
he may have more, and it may be pos
sible that Mr. Bartley may not be
able to deliver all of the goods he con
tracts to deliver. Speaking of the
Douglas delegation, there is every rea
son to believe that Attorney-General
Churchill's strength therein to from
twelve to fifteen votes. There is a
strong- Summers sentiment la this
delegation.
When the laughing Jack heard the
result of the primaries in Douglas
county he was so pleased that he pro
ceeded to celebrate In his usual man
ner. Jack will probably do most of
Ing republican voters are regarding
Meiklejohn with" peculiar interest
They see In him a man properly fitted
for the discharge of gubernatorial
duties. They see in him a dignified,
able man, a man who could lead the
republican party in this campaign In
a manner creditable to himself and
the party, who could successfully cope
with any candidate the demo-pope
might name. Mr. Meiklejohn appears
to be the one available man to meet
the demand for the right sort of a
candidate for governor. He is popular,
clean, energetic and one of the most
effective campaigners In the state.
The logic of the situation points to
him as the man best fitted to head the
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J. A. BAIIsEY, a Lincoln rider.
his celebrating this year before the
state convention.
For nearly a month now the atten
tion of the people of the state has been
drawn to Congressman Meiklejohn.
His canvass for the republican nom
ination for governor has been open,
straightforward, manly. He has not
formed or entered any combination
and has had no part in any slate mak
ing. He has made his campaign solely
on his merits. The result is that think-
state ticket this fall.
(Continued on next page.)
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Homan Walsh at Niagara
Few people in Lincoln are aware of
the part played by H. J. Walsh in the
building of the first bridge at Niagara
Falls. The following description of the
building of the first bridge is sent to the
Buffalo Times by its Falls correspon
dent:
The circumstances that led to the
erection of this cable line were the
result of a growing country. It was at
a time when the march of humanity
was westward. Then there were no
bridges across the gorge, but the de
mand for cne was so great that it was
recognised, and capital enlisted in the
.cause. A little boy, Homan Walsh by
name, flew his kite and allowed it to fall
on the Canadian bank. The slender
kite string drew a cord across, which
in turn was followed by a rope and
then a cable, 1,160 feet long, the ferry
was operated for the first time on March
13, 1848, a little over 48 years ago.
SUMMER TRIPS AT REDUCED
RATES.
The North-Western line is now sell
ing tickets at reduced rates to many
tourist points in the western, northern
and northeastern states and Canada.
Any one desiring a summer trip would
do well to secure our figures before pur
chasing tickets elsewhere.
CHEAP RATES TO ST PAUL AND
RETURN.
The North-Western is now selling at
reduced round trip rates, tickets to St
Paul, Minneapolis and numerous re
sorts in Minnesota. This Is the Short
Line. City office, 117 South Tenth St,
Lincoln, Neb.
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