Omaha daily bee. (Omaha [Neb.]) 187?-1922, September 30, 1917, NEWS SECTION, Image 14

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    CRITICS COME
TO MORRIS AID
IN FULTON BOUT
Declare Fulton Should Have
Been Disqualified When He
Left Ring; Precedent
Backs Agreements.
5
BY RINGSIDER. ,
Chicago, Sept. 24 Fred Fulton gen
erally was conceded the victor in his
bout with Carl Morris at Canton, O.,
on Labor Day, but there are sup
posedly competent fight critics' who
assert that Fulton really lost the bat
tle and that Morris should have been
given the decision when Fulton de
liberately left the ring and started
for his dressing room, returning only
in time to resume fighting when the
next round started.
These critics base their argument
on the claim that under the rules a
fighter has no right to climb outside
the roped inclosure until the contest
is ended, and that in so doing he com
mits a technical foul that must be
counted against him by the referee.
The referee, these critics declare,
should have disqualified the Minne
sota plasterer and given Morris the
decision as soon as Fulton stepped
outside the hempen square.
In support of their argument the
critics are delving into the records,
and have brought forward the action
of a refere in a bout at Louisville,
Ky., a few years ago, which seems to
afford a parallel to the Fulton-Morris
case.
Recalls Precedent.
The boxers in the Louisville bout
were of some prominence, and were
going along pretty well. It was an
exciting battle, and a big crowd was
watching the proceedings. During a
wild mixup in the centef of the ring
, the more prominent of the pair
landed a right swing flush on hisd-.
versary's jaw and stretched his op
ponent cold upon the canvas.
The man who had scored the knock
down knew it was a dream punch, i
: He could fell by the way the blow
landed that his rival was not going
to come to within the allotted ten
seconds. He was entirely right, but
his enthusiasm got the better of his
judgment. '
While the referee was tolling the
fatal seconds over the fallen gladiator
he had arrived at the count of seven
and looked around to see what the
other fellow was doing. He discov
ered that the victorious battler had
leaped out of the ring and was ming
ling with the spectators, accepting
congratulations and playing the tri-j
umphant hero before his faithful ad
mirers. ' x ' ' I
- The referee very promptly broke off
counting, declared the unconscious
gladiator on the floor a winner, and
disqualified the man who had left the
ring. Fight critics at that time up
held the verdict.
In' the old' days of boxing, when
everything was considered fair if you
' got away with it and fighters and
managers were willing to try any
thing once, it was a severe crime
against the rules to leave the ring.
The rule was observed strictly and
, as a result some great tricks were
tried to get an opponent to quit the
roped arena. Especially were the
managers alive to the possibilities of
such a situation when their men were
being licked. .
One of the favorite dodges was the
cry of "police," and many a false re
sult was brought about by the suc
- cessful manipulation of this trick. At
such an alarm an opponent probably
would' flee in panic and the man who
stayed in the ring would be handed
the verdict
Cilmore Saves Fight
Harry Gilmore, veteran, lightweight
star and one of the best of the old
time handlers, once saved a fight for
Tommy White by checkmating this
little trick. White was boxing Tommy
Morgan in a ring on the outskirts' of
Hammond, Ind., and it so happened
that the arena was built within a few
feet of the Illinois line, making it
easy for the "pugs" to escape in case
of need.
The men were using skin-tight
gloves and White was winning by a
mile when the cry came out of Mor
gan's corner that the constabulary
was in the offing. White, was in a
panic and was about to flee when Gil
more, who had seen the trick worked
.before, calmed' Tommy down. :
( ' CXet Morgan go first," Gilmore ad
vised, "then we'll be safe." .... ..;
Morgan did not leave the ring and
. the bout was resumed, but the police
did appear shortly afterwfrd and the
referee called the fight a draw.
"There never is any excuse for
laving the ring ; until . the battle is
over," said Gilmore, "and Fulton was
,t wrong in doing so, especially since he
was winning at the' time." 3 V
frrt Sheridan Soldiers
' Would See World Series
.Three thousandwnen in the officers'
training camp at- Fort Sheridan have I
petitioned President Johnson and
Charles Comiskey, asking that a "spe
- cial sale" of world's series tickets for
put on for them in case a game-is
played Saturday, October 6, in Chi
cago. Now, Ban. and Commy are
strong for the soldiers and all that,
but really, what woujd the civilian
fans say?
Milwaukee Third Baseman -Is
Made Officer in Army
Thomas Healey of the Milwaukee
Brewers was awarded a commission
in the dental corps of, the army and
, has reported for duty. Healey, who
, had his trial'with Connie Mack, is a
.'. graduate of the University of Pitts
. burgh. He was famous in base ball,
basket ball and track athletics in col-
lege, but could not stick in the big
. I show as a professional ball player.
Uuck Bobby Byrne Again
Collects World's Series Coin
, . - Bobby Byrne, substitute third base
inan with the White Sox. has been
; , lucky in base balL In 1909 he was
sent to Pittsburg by St Louis and
..shared in the world's series. After
leaving the Pirates he joined the Phil
lies and shared in their world's series
in 1914. He u recently released h
the Phillies and after Weaver's iu-
ny joined the White Sox
CURTAIN DROPS OH
SANDLOTPLAYERS
Sample-Harts Go to St. Joseph;
Double Bill at Bourke Park
Today; Kaiman Picks All
Star Team.
White Sox Infielders and Outfielders
BY FRANK QUIGLEY.
Of course a great deal of kicking
has been noticeable among the
salaried manaifra this spa son because
the stands and bleachers were never
taxed to the inut and what is true
among the professionals is equally
true among the amateurs, for al-
lifMio-h the Omaha Amateur Racetiall
association pulled through without
knocking at the doors ot Bankruptcy
it iitct made .he crraile urith a clicrht
balance on the right side of the
ledger.
Rase hall Is over as far as the Oma
ha Amateufv Baseball association is
concerned. The only uncompleted
business is to audit the books and to
hold the. annual banquet and election
of officers for next year. The ban
quet will be helci some time next
month, f
Today the Sauiple-Harts, the Class
C champion, will be entertained at St.
Joseph, Mo. They left at 9:05 a. m.
yesterday. The champions were ac
companied by Joseph Wavrin, presi
dent of the Booster league. No game
was scheduled for the Sample-Harts,
but it is exoected that with the
loquaciojs Joseph on the job the
champions will play some team at St.
losenh this afternnnn. Anvwav if
they don't play it wilt be a nke trip
n ,1 .. 1 vrt.KokI1U.. ....II ...t I
by the gang.
Not even a game is booked on a
municipal lot for today, consequently
all the muny lots will get a much
needed vacation. Baseballically speak
ing the only thing on the program
this afternoon is the double decker
booked for Rourke park, the1 first
game of which will be between the
Brandeis Stores and the Murphy-Did-Its,
Class B champions, and the sec
ond contest, Brandeis against
Armous, Class A champions.
- In the first mix Chamberlain will
probaWy oppose Peter McCoy, the
speed merchant, and in the second
tangle old man Graves, the reliable
exponent of puzzlers, will hoist the
pill for the Armour and Oleson will
work for the opposition. Two good
games and a largj crowd are expected
by the promoters.
Outside of these three teams noth
ing is carded in Omaha today, but the
Te-Be-Ce's headed by Earl Higgins
will invade Divid City and do their
utmost to corner the grapes.
Picks All-Stars.
Following is a first and second Att
Star lineup, picked by Abner Kaiman,
president of the Greater Omaha
league. Considering war conditions,
which caused the loss nf srime nrnm.
ising material during the fore part
oi me season, tne oreater Omaha
league furnished abundant material
for the formation of the mvthiral All.
Star lineup.
Kaiman, as president of the league,.
has had nrrasirtn tn viit .-n-;...
parks frequently, observing with par-
uvuibi tmcicsi me worn oi an me
players; therefore the All-Star lineups
herein mentionedconsist of what is,in
his 'opinion, two well balanced ag
gregations, containing hone but those
who deserve a nositinn nnlv thrmrii
their consistent work.
Ihe catchincr (fenartnient in Vf .-
o r ... whojvi
and Spellman can hardly be equalled.
MuSSer is a Veteran 9 rteuer tiIU.
of pitchers and a dangerous sticker in
a pincn. apenman is a sturdy back
stop whose slashing hitting featured
the Holmes Diav. Rtighrnhorir anA
Jones are a pair of receivers who bear
excellent reputations; however, the
former's hittinff slumn anrt the tatt-'
inexperience relegate the pair to the
aciuuu teams.
v The twirlinor staff wa nirUm
most difficult for Kaiman to select.
i ne nuriing ot Andy.Graves, the griz
zled veteran, stands out prominent
among the pitchers and he is easily
the initial selection. Potach's ability
to down th,e topnotch clubs of the
league earns him the other position.
"Rube" Feltman is head and shoul
ders above any of the initial sackers
in hitting and fielding. This'rangy lad
has gobbled up all sorts -of weird
heavies with apparent ease and eclat.
Edward Minikus has but few rivals
for the keystone sack honors. Ed
ward compiled a marvelous fielding
record and was the foremost swatter
in the Melady attack.
' The position of shortstop is given
to Chip Bowley, though second bas
ing all season for the Armours. His
neetness of foot and uncanny man
nee nf nlarl.rv Ui t. : 1 - - . .
.... . t..v.i..s umgics ( crucial
times proved a great factor in a good
many of the champs victories.
Like Minikus, Corcoran has but few
equals and is considered, therefore, as
the unanimous choice for the warm
corner. v
A formidable trio of gardeners are
,Ll?.my: 5. Feltman and Dennison.
While they may not be considered as
slashing hitters they are capable of
producing bingles at opportune times.
Dennison, the weakest hitter of the
trio, is a crafty man on the paths and
an excellent fielder as evinced bv his
perfect fielding record. Neno of the
ie-Be-Ces acquitted himself credit
ably both in the infield nnA
I , m " VHUIVIU
ana is namea as the utility man.
ucuikc ivrnnrnv nacr vnrin
, 7 r vA.ntuvv
Itl the Successful bandlintv f mn
CftmS him the ftnnmntmnt a m-h
- - -rywiinimin v mail-
ager for this formidable crew and
wun j awn uennison as the field cap
tain, brains, judgment and generalship
are combined in the direction of the
team s pFay. f t.
First Uam. George Kennedy, minuter;
. Holme. ; Dennleon.
rlfhtlleld. MeUdya; Mlnlkui. aecond bae.
Meladya; Corcoran, third base. Armour.:
5,. ,hrt"toP. Armouras Kemmy. left
mblera: R. Feltman, flrat baae. T.
B. C.j Spellman. catcher. Holme.; Muaaer.
eatcher. Armour.; Qrarea. pitcher. Armour.;
Potach. pitcher, Ramblera; Neno, utility, T.
Second team: Wayfield. canter field. Ar
mouraj Olllham. captain, eecond base,
Holmea; PhlllWe. third hnsa. DeVol Vlctora;
Haaen. left field. Holmea; Sw.mon. ahort
atop. Ramblera; Wachtler, flrat baae Ma
ladya; Molbrook. rltht field, T. ft C.t Jonea.
catcher. ItaVol Vlrtnr.. "."LIT
Melady.; Pyck, pitcher, Holmea; Van Wor-,1
mer. pucarr, , uevoh. Vlctora; ettilmock,.
utility, Polish Merchant. Earl Hlaglna,
manager. , , . - , i j
Former Big League Hurler
Is Summoned by Draft
Earl Moseley, a pitcher formerly
with the Cincinnati Reds and the Bos
ton Red Sox, who has Keen playing
independent bsll this year at bis home
in Youngstown. 0. is in an army
training camp with Ohio drafted sol
diers. '
A -- . . 6
i i SN ral ifiA M i
Fri II m ' Run if !;teJl
'; - Z, , S i. . 74. ' 7Je7 ' - .
1
Jril'J'S SOX OUTFJBL-DEiaS
Reading left to right: Liebold, Felsch, J. Collins, Jackson.
V. VtV,v .-. .V.' v. .7,.'.v,yi .'.v.v.v,v. , . . . .;:-f,v,H
1
O k I
FULTON LOGICAL
FOE OFCHAMPION
Morris' Foul Tactics Send Him
Into Pugilistic Discard and
Leaves a Free Field
for Fred.
With the installation of Fred Ful
ton, Minn ota iiant, in the pugilistic
spotlight as the only logical opponent
for Champion Jess Willard in a title
contest, by virtue of Fulton's victory
over Carl Morris at Canton, 0.; on
Labor da. on a foul, there is much in
the way of "hang over" that can be
written concerning the event which
brought about this result. Perhaps
the prin:ipal thing that should be said
is that Fultjr and no o,ne else in the
heavyweight ranks deserves a jcrack
at the titleholder, for Morris elimi
nated himself completely from the
running. Beforr their meeting the
Oklahoma scrapper was considered
just as strong a miller as Fulton.
Class was the main thing' that stood
out in the Canton clash. Fulton had
all the class. A better boxer, a better
and harder hitter and a cleaner scrap
per, he showed his supremacy. When
it became evident to Morris that he
was in for a lacing, he .adopted foul
tactics which caused Referee Matt
Hinkel to disqualify him in the sixth
round. No more palpable fouls ever
were committed in any ring1, and Jhe
only wonder is that Morris was not
declared loser earlier in the scrap.
Hinkel declares that no less than
twenty times from the hird to the
sixth round Morris deliberately but
ted his head into Fulton's chin.
Hinkel Considers Crowd.
When that number of fouls is con
sidered, it certainly shows that Matt
Hinkel deserves a lot of credit for
patience. But Hinkel had something
else to think of besides stopping the
COMEY AT LAST
HAS DREAM COME
TRUE ONCE MORE
Old Roman Succeeds in Bag
giing Anothar Pennant After
Eleven Years of
Striving.
BY JACK VEIOCK.
New York, Sept. 29. After a span
of eleven years, the Chicago White
Sox are about to enter another world's
series under Chailey Comiskey, the
venerable "Old Roman" of base ball.
Back in 1906 the famous "fiitless
Wonders," managed by Fielder Jones,
rantured the American league pen-
I nant for Comiskey and then licked the
Cubs in the world s series.
Since that time the silver-haired
Chicago magnate has been striving to
win further Honors, but year after
year his teams were beaien out, sev
eral times by the narrowest of mar
gins. No club owner in the game has
spent as much money for ball players
in the last eleven years as Comiskey,
yet he has taken defeat like a game
sport and haj never failed to come
back for more.
He is now preparing to enjoy the
fruits of a victory he richly deserves,
for the team he has gotten together
is one of the greatest that has ever
won an American league pennant, and
critics are agreed that it will do itself
proud in the coming world's series
against the Giants.
No club owner in the game today
has a more loyal following in his
home city than Comiskey. The fans
of Chicago swear by him, and he has
a host of friends throughout the coun
try who will glory in his success.
rnmkkcv rlpscrvps murh of the
Ciac LU LlllllJl UI UC31UC3 dLUJJHI U1C J . ' " ' . . .
ficht fnr Vie tinrl heen a half ni-tner credit for the success of the Amen-
in the promotion of the show and felt ' ca.n league, it was tne uia pman
Reading left to right: Weaver. McMuIlen; Jourdan, Byrne, E. Collins, Risberg, Gandil.
ATTEL MASTER IN
MANY WILY TRICKS
Former Featherweight Cham
pion Was One of Foxiest
Scrappers Who Ever
Donrsd a Glove.
Of all the quick-thinking fighters
there probably never was one su
perior to Abe Attel, the little. He
brew who held the featherweight
title for so many years. Time after
time when in desperate straits Abe's
quick wits saved the day for him
when another fighter would have
gone down to defeat. Danny Good
man, who long acted as Attel's chief
trainer and second, tells many good
stories illustrating the latter's re
markable headwork in critical situa
tions. I
According to Goodman, the wily
Attel once -saved his title ia a bout
with . Johnny Kilbane ,at Cleveland
when all hope seemed gone. In one
of the early rounds Attel hooked a
savage left for the head Kilbane
saw it coming and ducked inside, so
that Attel's forearm landed on the
skull, spraining it so badly that the
arm was useless.
With his best weapon out of com
mission, Attel's chances of winning
the decision went aglimmering. But
he concealed his injury, not even
mentioning the fact that he had been
hurt to his seconds. During the mirt
ute's rest at the end of the round At
tel did some deep thinking, and by
the time the gong sounded his plan
was formed. '
Cleverly Trips Opponent.
In the first clinch he cleverly
tripped his opponent so that the pair
went down in a heap with Attel un
derneath and with his right arm
twisted behind his back. The whole
thing was done so cleverly that it
looked as though Kilbane had com
mitted a foul by wrestling the cham
pion to the floor.
Attel promptly set up a cry that
his right arm had been broken, wail
ing that his fighting days were over
and doing everything in his power to
create a scene that would confuse the
referee, who naturally was full of
sympathy and not inclined to be se
vere in his ruling. The upshot of the
matter was thatUhe bout was t put
down as no contest, and Ahe's title
was saved. .
However, it was necessary to main
tain the decision to the end, and it
still looked black for. Abe, because a
physician's examination would show
that there was nothing wrong with
his right arm.' Instead of claiming
that his bruised left had been broken,
Attel had chosen to fake an injury to
his right, figuring that if the trick did
not work and he was ordered to go
on and fight he would be much bet
ter off if his opponent did not know
which was the bad arm.
There were plenty of physicians- at
the ringside who offered their serv
ices, but in order to gain time and
escape from the club Attel made such
a fuss that he was bandied off to a
hospital without a close examination.
Goodman, much concerned, and be
lieving like the rest that Abe's arm
was really broken, arranged to sit up
all night and comfort his friend. But
the moment they were left alone Abe
broke into a crafty smile. N ,
"Go oa back to the hotel, Danny."
he said.. "My right arm's all right.
It's roy left that's hurt, and it's only
bruised. , There's nothing to worry
about."" . v .
Frisco Signs Tacoma Man
To Fill Out Behind Plate
The San Francisco club has signed
Carl Stevens, catcher, who finished
the season for Tacoroa in the North
western league. The Seals' catching
staff went to the bad so- completely
that the veteran Jess Orendorff had
to be dug up for work recently.
f Western League
Individual and team records of the
playoff for the championship of the
second half Western league season:
TEAM BATTING.
O. AB. H. H. SR. BR PSt
Joplln s 5 5 20 2 8 .311
Hutchlnion 92 12 is .207
TEAM FIELDING.
W. 'L. T. DP. P. A. B. Pet.
Hutchinson .... i 0 .0 1 84 38 1 .992
Joplln 0 3 0 0 81 36 7 .944
INDIVIDUAL BATTING AVERAGES.
O.AB.R. HTB.8H.SB.Pct.
Falk, Hutchlnion.. 3 7 1 S 10 1 0 .714
Lamb, Joplln 3 13 3 4 8 0 0 .333
Shay, Hutchinson.. 3 9 1 3 3 1 1 .333
M'Cullouith, Hutch 1 3 0 1 1 0 0 .333
Brokaw, Joplln. . 3 11 0 3 4 0 0 .273
Cochran, Joplln.... 3 11 0 3 4 0 1 .273
Monroe, Joplln...-, 3 11 3 8 3 0 0 .273
P. Graham, Hutch. 14 1 1 1 0 0 ,2i0
Robertson, Hutch.. 14 0 110 0 .2C0
Smith, Hutchinson 3 3 2.3 1 0 .223
MrCabe, Hutch.... 3 14 0 3 3 0 0 .214
O'Brien, Hutch.... 3 10 1 3 3 1 0 WOO
Burg-, Joplln..... t 10 0 3 3 0 0 .200
Mots, Joplln 3 11 0 1 3 0 1 .183
Davla, Joplln 3 8 0 1 1 1 0 .167
O. Graham, Joplln 1 6 0 1 1 0 0 .167
Benson, Hutch.... 2 t 3 1 1 0 0 .111
Carlisle, Joplln.... 3 10 0 1 2 1 0 .100
Collins, Joplln.... 3 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Hall. Joplln.. 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 .000
Mapel, Joplln 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Saunders. Joplln. . 2 3 0 0 0 0 .000
Wright, Hutch.... 1 S 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Henry, Hutch 2 10 1 0 0 1 1 .000
McClollan, Hutch. 3 10 2 0 0 1 1 .000
PITCHING RECORDS.
O. W. L. Ip. Er. P.O. H.Bb.So.
Wright, Joplln. 1 1 0 9 0 0.00 2 2 4
F. Graham. H... 1 1 0 10 3 1.80 11 2 2
O. Graham, J. 1 1 0 10 2 1.80 6 2 4
Robertson, H... 1 1 0 9 2 2.00 6 2 6,
Sanders. Joplln 2 0 1 11 2 2.46 7 2 7
Hall, Joplln.... 1 0 0 2 1 3.00 2 0 0
Mapel, Joplln.. 1 0 1 3 2 6.00 4 0 2
'Three and one thi-d Innings.
American League
TEAM BATTING.
G. AB. R. H. SB. BB. SO. Pet.
Detroit ..161 4991 618 .1294 168 479 466 .257
Chicago .162 4916 636 1241 212 619 477 .252
Phlla ....147 4886 696 1233 104 419 390 .252
Clove ....169 4870 674 1192 206 639 630 .245
St. Louis. 151 4974 498 1205 144 393 624 .212
Boston ..160 4927 617 1162 91 339 448 .241
N'w T'k..l49 4965 600 1176 118 433 616 .237
Wash ...148 4833 605 1136 163 497 658 .236
TEAM FIELDING.
W. L. T. DP. PO. A. E. Pet.
Boston 87 88 6 107 4068 1996 178 .971
Chicago 98 63 2 111 4143 1772 195 .968
New York.... 67 80 2 126 4067 2029 211 .967
Detroit 77 73 1 90 4102 1972 225 .964
Cleveland ....8C 64 2 134 4140 2119 238 .962
St. Louis 66 94 1 144 4130 2067 266 .962
Phlla 51 95 1 102 3917 1935 238 .961
Wash 69 76 4 122 4005 1796 242 .960
INDIVIDUAL BATTING AVERAGES.
O. AB. K. H. TB SH.8B.Pct.
Cobb, Det 2(0 577 J04 218 325 12 48 .378
H'm t'n. St. L. 27 19 0 7 9 1 0 .368
Sp'k'r. Cleve..l41 614 90 184 253 16 31 .358
Slsler, St. L..135 639 60 187 241 16 37 .347
AR's'll, N. Y. 30 30 3 10 12 1 0 .333
Ruth. Bo.... 48 113 9 36 51 7 7 .319
Felsch, Chi. ..149 668 72 172 226 30 25 .30b
Harris, Cleve.U0 364 40 112 144 3 11 .308
Veach, Det. ...161 661 77 173 249 24 24 .108
M'In's, Phil. ..144 543 47 165 189 23 16 .304
Gslnor, Bos... 47 156 24 47 66 7 601
PITCHING RECORDS.
G. W.L. IP.ER.P.G. H.BB.SO.
L'wVmk. St. L. 3 1 t 18 1 0.60 13 3 7
Naylor, Phil... 3 1 1 16 3 1.00 13 816
Cleotte. Chi. ...48 37 11 336 58 1.66 231 67 144
8.0-vre. Cleve. 44 II 14 298 59 1.78 202 96 129
Faber, Chi 39 16 12 246 50 1.84 221 81 289
Ruth, Boston... 29 23 12 808 64 1.87 229 108 118
Leonard, Boa. .36 1 16 386 61 1.93 343 70 140
Bagby. Cleve. .48 22 12 213 68 1.96 269 73 77
Ma a. Boston... 33 21 2 271 69 1.95 216 76 89
Plank, St L.... 26 6 6 129 28 1.96 101 29 21
Ayrrs. Wash. ..36 t 1 181 41 3.03 160 68 69
J. Scott, Chi. . .34 T 7 124 29 2.11 132 42 39
Fisher, N. Y.... 23 9 144 34 3.13 124 43 46
Shore, Boston.. 29 13 10 338 64 1.12 199 251 68
K.A.R'ssell. Chl.15 15 6 189 45 2.14 172 232 61
Cmbe, Cleve... 38 I 1 126 28 2.20 112 22 29
Dumont Wash. 46 22 16 2U 79 1 12 341 77180
James, Det... ...13 13 9 189 47 3 24 144 ,4 60
G. Foster, Bos.. 16 T 7 116 29 2.25 101 47 31
rkels'B, Cleve. 1 2 17 4 2.25 I 11 8
Kl'krr. Cleve.. 40 14 4 211 63 2.26 195.55 66
.Hens. Chi 18 5 2 86 22 2.30 72 23 23
tVnfortb. Chi.. 49 11 6 164 43 2 33 147 73 76
Under. Boston. 14 3 39 10 1.37 60 18 4
l'ennock, Us..3 I 4 91 24 3.38 76 22 36
W.M'ch'I. Det
A. R's'll, N. Y
Kh wkey, N. Y.
Dauss, Dot....
Bush, Phlla....
C. WTms, Chi.
Boland. Det...
Love. N. Y. . . .
Gallia, Wash..
C dwell, N. Y. .
D'v'np't. St. L.
R. J'ns'n, Phil.
Noyst Phlla...
C'n'gham, Det.
W'lman, St. L.
Mog'dge. N. Y.
Shaw, Wash...
Shocker, N. Y.
H. Cel'k'e, Det.
S'th'ron, St. L.
Groom. St. L..
Morton, Cleve..
Cullop, N. Y...
C. Jones, Det. .
Harper, Wash. .
Monroe, N. Y..
Ehmke, Det....
Schauer, Phil.
L'mb'th. Cleve
Wright, St. L. .
Solbold, Phlla.
H'mllton. St. L
Rogers, St. L. .
Myers, Phlla..
Koob, St. L...
Jones, Bos....
30 12 7
.25 7 9
31 1314
36 16 14
35 10 17
42 17 8
43 16 12
31 6 5
40 9 12
32 13 16
451716
32 9 11
27 10 10
42 3 6
5 12
28 8 11
44 13 13
25 7 6
16 4 6
37 8 19
37 8 19
84 9 10
29 5 9
24 4 4
29 1211
9 10
35 10 15
83 6 16
7 6
0 1
4 15
0 9
8 6
9 15
6 14
0 1
185 60
104 28
235 64
262 73
220 62
223 66
238 71
121 36
195 59
235 72
267 82
67
173 54
128 40
19 6
189 60
245 79
136 44
68 22
235 75
225 76
153 61
145 49
77 26
171 68
28 10
206 73
209 76
97
37 15
157 64
82 35
109 46
191 88
129 61
16 8
2.43172
2.43 87
2.45 199
2.61 234
2.64 190
2.66 213
2.68 175
2.68 107
2.73 179
2.75 201
2.76 252
2.80 178
2.81 153
2.81 100
2.84 19
2.86 179
2.90 207
2.92 118
2.92 70
3.00186
3.00 186
3.00 149
3.04 162
3.04 68
3.05 143
3.11 35
3.19 177
3.23 203
3.29 67
3.65 38
3.67 136
3.80 89
3.80 113
4.15 215
4.29 132
4.50 15
47 74
39 65
70 98
78 99
107 119
74 78
96 87
66 73
93 81
77 103
93 98
259 63
77 66
46 41
7 9
29 44
119 118
246 67
14 17
91 75
91 75
68 63
31 27
25 23
97 92
6 11
86 93
69 68
30 26
12 6
85 67
41 21
46 25
80 89
66 42
National League
TEAM BATTING.
G. AB. R. H. SB. BB. SO. Pet.
Cln 153 5126 580 1347 140 300 455 .263
N. Y. ..161 4962 601 1281 143 359 502 .258
Phil 147 4829 650 1200 108 M16 600 .248
St. Louis. 161 4973 516 1228 154 354 639 .247
Boston ..148 4882 694 1194 139 400 649 .245
Brook... 147 4949 481 1213 115 311 478 .245
165 5057 645 1201 124 409 573 .238
152 6017 446 1186 152 286 546 .236
TEAM FIELDING.
W. L. T DP. PO. A. E. Pet.
..Si 68 2 151 408S 2247 210 .968
94 53 4 112 4085 2003 200 .968
84 61 2 113 3965 1997 205 .967
,.67 77 4 111 4019 2070 21? .967
49 100 3 116 4211 1906 243 .962
75 75 3 114 4072 1969 237 .462
65 77 6 94 4012 1888 240 .961
74 78 3 125 4138 1984 258 .960
ivnrvmiTi 1 t i ttiva tvirDinra
N- n An n v Da en en d.i
Roush. Cln 136 519 83 178 216 13 19.343
Hornxby, St. L.. 142 610 82 161 339 17 18 .216
Kauff, N. Y..... 149 644 89 169 213 20 31 311
Groh. Cln 163 581 87 177 Z33 6 16 .305
Burns, N. Y. . .149 686 101 176 241 6 35 .300
PITCHING RECORDS.
Ave.
Q.W.L.IP.ER.PG.H. BB.SO.
Chicago
Pitts....
St. Louis.
New York.
Phlla
Boston . .
Pltts'gh...
Cln........
Brooklyn. .
Chicago. . .
.Scott, Boston..
Pomler, Pitts...
Mlljus, B.-ook..
Hughes, Boston.
Anderson, N. Y.37
21 1 0.40 11
17 1 0.53 , 1
T3 2 1.50 13
68 12 1.68 47
8 161 29 1.62 129
Alexander. Phi 13 29 12 370 72 1.76 314 54 186
Bender, Phlla.. 19 7 2 107 21 1.76 75 22 43
8chupp, N. Y...33 20 7 265 65 1.87 206 69 143
Perritt, N. Y...14 16 7 204 45 1.99 1R0 44 65
Pfeffer. Brook. .28 11 13 255 59 2.08 208 52 117
Weaver. Chi... 31 1 0 13 3 2.08 6 6 2
Goodwin. & L..11 5 3 73,17 2.10 64 16 36
Sallee, N. Y...33 19 6 212 50 2.12 192 31 61
Nehf, Boston... 37 15 3 224 64 2.17 190 40 95
Vaughn, Chi.. .41 24 13 295 72 2.20 254 93 195
Schneider. Cln.. 45 19 19 331 81 2. SI 311 116 1.11
Cheney, Brook. 33 8 11 201 50 2.22 175 66 97
Rtxey, Phlla. ...37 16 10 256 66 2.-82 238 69 116
'Toney. Cln 42 24 16 338 89 2.37 298 78 119
Cooper, PltU... 38 16 11 274 74 2.38 263 63 94
Packard. St. L.45 9 6 150 40 3.39 139 24 45
Ames. St L... 6 17 10 216 58 2.4 188 62 65
Hendrix. Chi. ..38 10 12 210 67 2.43 197 72 79
M4rquard. Brk.35 17 13 2148 2.46 183 67 107
Tyler, Boston.. 29 11 211 68 2.46 176 81 87
Cadore, Brook. .34 12 11 238 66 2.49 207 69 103
Eller. Cln 36 8 6 144 40 1.60 123 35 66
Seaton, Chi. ..'..16 5 4 74 21 2.66 69 23 26
Oeschger, Phil.. 41 IS 1 241 69 2.57 215 70 116
Benton. N. Y. ..31 14 8 190 66 2.66 170 36 68
Mayer, Phlla.. .28 11 6 161 48 2.63 160 33 65
Regan, Cln 31 11 9 205 62 2.73 217 41 43
Jacobs, Pitta... 36 6 21 206 63 3.75 194 71 64
Teareau, N. Y.29 1. 9 175 64 2.78 159 65 82
Barnes, Boston. 49 12 13 277 86 2.79 244 46 91
Douglas, Chi. ..51 13 19 287 90 2. 83 263 48 148
Doak, St L 43 i; 19 279 85 3.84 246 79 103
Demaree, N. Y.37 9 13 212 68 2.89 187 63 62
Aldrige, Chi. ..28 6 7 106 34 2.89 95 37 44
Carlson, Pitta.. 34 1 11 162 53 3.94 142 48 68
Carter, CM 23 i 3 113 37 2.95 115 19 34
Ragan, Boston. 30 ( 9 149 49 3.96 137 35 69
Steele. Pitts 38 6 13 212 79 1.97 180 65 103
F. Miller, Pltts.35 10 19 220 75 1.07 210 61 89
SmltB,N. Y....12 0 3 83 11 3.10 33
that he should go as far as possible in
order to give the fans a ruh for their
money. As there were something
like 7,000 persons at the ringside, and
they had paid more than $18,000 for
the privilege of seeing what they had
thought would be a real battle, Hin
kel's way of reasoning easily can be
understood.
Going back to the actual business
of fighting, it is necessary to say that
Fulton, although the winner, did not
give the impression that lie is pos
sessed of wonderful gameness. He
made the mistake of nearly jumping
out of the ring in the fifth round,
when the referee had temporarily
stopped the boxers to warn Morris
against fouling. If he had managed
to get out of the ring he would have
been disqualified instead of Morris,
but his chief second, Harry Wills,
yanked Fred back through t'e ropes
and, with the aid of Manac. Mike
Collins, got Fulton to return to the
battling.
Fulton's Teeth Broken.
There were quite a few ringsiders
who-, put a shoulder to the wheel
along with Ban Johnson in the for
mation of the league in the winter of
1899, and when the National league
finally agreed t peace terms, it was
Comiskey who helped dictate them.
Old timers remember Comiskey
during his days a- a player with the
! famous St. Louis Browns, who cap-
turea lour straigrr pennants, ne was
one of the greatest fielding first base
men the old days developed, and he
was the first player to introduce the
style of fielding the position that is
prevalent today. Back in 1887 Com
iskey surprised the critics by playing
deep, so that he could field hard-hit
ground balls that were too close to
the foul line for the second baseman.
The style has been used ever since.
Hundreds of thousands of dollars
will change hands with the playing of
this year's world's series.
The big series of the p?st have al
ways attracted countrywide interest,
and much money has been wagered
from year to year, but this fall, with
the country's two largest cities rep
resented, there is going to be a
who declared after the bout that Ful- greater wave of interest in the games
ton was ready to jump out of the ring j tna" eve Der&r-
even betore tne htth round, but that
is a matter yet to be proved. In jus
tice to Fulton it must be said that he
was stung hard and often by the hard
butting of Morris. Such damage
was far worse than taking a punch
and Fred showed by the results when
he left the ring that he had been pun
ished. One tooth had been knocked
out and another broken off. He was
forced to hurry direct from the ring
to a den.ist to have the exposed nerve
of the broken tooth covered.
Fulton, however, had an alibi for
his effort to get out of the ring. "I
thought I h rd the referee tell Morris !
that he was disqualified, and I natur
ally thought that the bout was over,
so I started to leave the ring. I wa3
surprised when Wills grabbed rne by
the arm and pulled me back to my
chair.
Fulton Solves Offense.
It was only a rnatter of time before
Fulton would have been declared the
winner as loffg as he could assimilate
the butting punishment, for at the
time the bout was stopped he was
showing such marked supremacy that
Morris looked certain to be defeated
by the knockout route. Fulton for a
couple of rounds was unable to find
a way to prevent Morris from punch
ing him at close quarters. In the
third session he was tipped off by his
manager to grab both of Morris' arms
just as soon as Carl got in close.
When the Minnesotan started to
hold Carl's arms, Morris' main stock-in-trade
was gone and defeat was in
sight. In the meantime, befort al
lowing Morris to get in close, Fred
was pumping solid left-hand jabs to
Morris' face and uppercutting with
hard rights to the chin. The.se hard
wallops hurt the Oklahoman and
slowed him, and it was then that he
resorted to the butting business
which meant defeat for him a few
rounds later.
New York fans are prepared to
back the Giants clear down to the fam
ily plate. Chicago fans will he t every
thing dowr. to their sox that the
White Sox win.
There is no way of telling how,
much money wili be wagered, for
only the largest bets will be given
publicity, but it is safe to say that
more than-- a million dollars will
change hands when the last game is
played.
Attendance figures are not expected
to fall unless the series should go to
seven or eight games, but according
to baseball men 150,000 fans will wit
ness the first four games. The Na
tional Commission has taken the usual
precautions against the workings of
speculators, yet it is probable that
hundreds of thkets will fall into the
hands of the scalpers, for it is next to
impossible to keep them from secur
ing the coveted pasteboards.
2$ 1 5?
Let Us Tailor
Your New Suit
Don't pay 30 for the very same
suit or 'overcoat we are tailoring
to ord"er for $15. Over 500 styles
to select from.-
N. W. Corner 15th and Harney Su.
1
ononononononononononannnftnnrinrinrrni-rA
Rudolph, Boa. .3910 '216 76 4.17 208
Prendrgat, Chi. 33 2 5 93 38 3.20101
Grimes. Pitts. .36 3 17 205 74 2.25 200
S. Smith, Brk. .40 9 12 193 70 3.37 301
Lavender, Phll.27 7 7 114 45 3.27 110
Watson, St. L..41 11 13 161 69 3.29 148
Meadows. St 1-41 16 f 221 82 3.34 343
C. Mitchl. Cln. .33 10 15 167 60 3.42 166
Horstman. 8. L.34 7 4 128 50 3.53 109
Dell. Brooklyn.. 17
Evans, Fltte.... 8
Ruether, Cln.. .15
Coombs, Brook. 30
Plttery. Phila..l6
Russell, Brook. 5
Allen, Boston.. 29
Ring, Cln 24
Mamaux, Pitts.. 16
4 58 23 3.67 63
1 4 27 11 1.67 24
3 2 61 25 2.69 79
3 11 131 68 3.78 140
1 1 62 13 3.81 69
1 16 7 3.93 13
3 10 112 52 4.18 127
3 7 69 44 4.45 90
211 85.18 5.09 91 49 21
49
20
.71
46
46
61
88
24
(1
25
14
22
49
16
46
45
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BOWLING
BILLIARDS
FOUNTAIN
AK-SAR-BEN VISITORS
WELCOME
Open Alleys Every Evening
Farnam Alleys ' 1807 Farnam
MYRON STUNZ, Manager
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jnonononononononononononononononont!