Omaha daily bee. (Omaha [Neb.]) 187?-1922, May 13, 1917, Want-Ad Section, Image 27

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    I
rrttv UMAHA SUNDAY KRK: 'MA'i in. hm
5 O.
ALLIES DRIVE TURKS
BEYOND DIALA RIVER
Thousands of New Graves
Mark Course of Army as It
Continues Its Retreat.
VILLAGES ARE ABANDONED
lOorretjpondenct of Ths Associated Frsss.)
London, Ap.il 27. Russian Cos
sacks who had fought their way down
from the Caucasus and Indian Lancers
who had helped to drive the Turks
up the Tigris valley and out of Bag
dad, met in a casual manner at Kizil
Robat, northeast of Bagdad on April
2. reports the official eye-witness with
the British forces in Mesopotamia.
This mcetingilinked together the Rus
sian and British lines into one long
front from the Black Sea to the Per
sian gulf. Narrating the incident, the
eye-witness writes from Kizil. Robat:
"At noon on April 2 we met the
Russians here. The officer command
ing our column, seeing their cavalry
with the blue and white pennant,
called up the Indian Lancers, who
pushed forward, wheeled into line,
saluted, and turned back, bringing the
Russians into camp.
"Our allies had a hard task from
Hamadan, through an inhospitable
country, over snow passes, trodden
into the consistency of ice, down into
the burning heat of ravines, but they
pressed hard on the heels of (he
Turks. .
Suffer Heavy Losses. '
"The road all the .way from Hama
dan was a defile between snowclad
ranges, which made a turning move
ment impossible, hence there was no
opportunity of rounding up the Turk
ish rearguard; but owing to the re
lentless pressure of the pursuit the
enemy suffered heavy losses in the re
treat through artillery fire, sickness
and exhaustion.
"All the way the road was littered
with dead mules, horses, camels, asses
and buffaloes. The Turks' ranks were
ihinnefl by typhus and their infantry
were footsore, their light Hamadan
boots only lasting a few days, and
most of them were barefooted. The
villages are full of deserters.
"The country between Kermanshah
and Khanikin is an uninhabited
waste. Seven armies have passed it
in ten months. Villages are aban
doned and su. . lies do not exist even
in districts which are least exhausted.
New Graves Fill Cemeteries.
"Many Turks fell from exhaustion,
and the cen.eteries of every village
show signs of new graves. Nearly
2.000 were counted at Kermanshah
alone. The Cossack horses were fed
on dry leaves and shrubs.
"At lunch we drank the health of
the Russia army. A motor convoy
brought in bully-beef rations, biscuits,
jam and dates for the Cossack squad
rog.. "The Cossacks, a hard weather
beaten, cheery crowd, were soon fra
ternizing with our troops. They ride
with short stirrups, toes down, heels
up, leaning forward, their weight
thrown on the stirrups. They wore
jack boots and sheepskin caps. Be
sides their rifles they carried knives
and curved Caucasian scimitars with
out hand guards.
"They came in at a walk, their small
horses being heavily laden and look
ing thin and spent. They had crossed
the Persian frontier at Kaar-i-Shirin
and bivouacked last night ten miles
northeast of Kizil Robat. Their casu
alties during the whole march from
Hamadan were not heavy.
Johnnie on the Spot.
The young teacher had been having a.
trying time with her nature study class
because Johnnie had discovered he knew
more than she did about birds and frogs and
1 J assumed a derisive attitude In conse
quence. She appealed to the man principal,
who replied. "Next time you have the olass,
let me know, and I'll coma In and take
uharge of It. I think I can settle Johnnie."
He was duty called in and all went well
at first. With confidence the principal said
at the conclusion of tho lesson, "Now you
may each ss!l one question." Johnnie had
l.een silent up to this time. When It came
his turn he rose and asked:
"It a duck eyebrows ?" New York
Tlrtits.
Cornered.
"Henry, what time was It when you' got
home last night?" asked - Mrs. Duffersby.
"The clock flad stopped."
"Oh, about it o'clock, I think," answered
Mr. Duffersby.
"That's strange. The Jlbways next door
always retire punctually at midnight and
their house had been dark a long time be
fore you came."
".Maybe they bad a headache or some
thing." "1 hadn't thought of that. I'll ask Mrs.
.tibwny this morning."
"Woman," exclaimed Mr. Duffersby, In
desperation, "cease pestering me! It was
- g. in., when I got home." Birmingham
Age.
Matter Kaaily Fixed.
Congressman Charles R. Davis, of Minne
sota, relates that one afternoon a train
ihi a western railroad stopped at a small
RlHtion, when one of the passengers In look
ing over the place found his gaze tlxed upon
mi Interesting sign. Hurrying to the side of
'he conductor; ho eagerly inquired, "Do you
ihink that I will have time to get a drink
l.efore the train starts?"
"Oh, yes." answered the conductor.
"But suppose." suggested the thirsty pss-.-.'tigcr,
"that the train should go on without
me."
"We Tan easily fix that " promptly replied
I lie conduelor. "I will go along and have
me with you."-Minneapolls Journal.
United States Government's Opening of Indian
Land in Southeastern Oklahoma
HAVE YOU EXERCISED YOUR GOVERNMENT R!GHT?-500,000 acre, of rich agricultural grazing
ind timber lands in the greatest undeveloped oil territory in the United States to be thrown open to the
public.
IMPORTANT POINTS-You do not have to live on the land. You do not have to improve the land. The
land " close to railroads and market towns. No irrigation necessary, 40 inches of rainfall. You may ac-
4-.. . ui una iana. u s your iasi Dig land opportunity. You obtain this
ci mucin, i ou musi act
Under supervision of McAlester Exchange from McAiester,
Oklahoma, is here to five you free information reuardin the land
and the method you pursue to exercise your rights. This oppor
tunity is limited and immediate action it necessary.
WOUNDED OFFICERS
REVIEW BATTLE
Say That Mistakes and Blun
ders Were All Made on
German Side of the
Line.
(Correspondence of The Associated Tress.)
London, April 30. Stirring inci
dents of the tremendous fighting on
the Arras battlefield arc related by
wounded officers and men who have
returned from the British front in
France. That these men are abso
lutely satisfied with the progress the
British troops are making is quickly
evident. They are pleased with every
aspect of the fighting. It is difficult
to extract a .grumble even from that
most exacting critic, the "old soldier."
It is pointed out here that this situ
ation gives the soldiers confidence,
the surest foundation of perfect
morale, and that this, hacked by
abundant material, leads to victory.
Asked if there were no mistakes,
oversights, checks or blunders, one
young officer who had been wounded
in the head and left hajid with shrap
nel and whose life had been saved by
one Of the British army's so-called
"tin hats," rerjlied : ( ,
"Oh, yes, there were checks and
blunders, all right; only they weren't
on ourside of the fence. They were
all on the other side of the 'granite
wall;' Mister Hindenburg's side, you
know. I guess he will be issuing an
other order to his armies, as he did
over the December show at Verdun,
demanding stricter training and re
gretting faulty morale. All those
guns, you know, and the thousands
of unwounded prisoners, and the Ger
man barrage that didn't get going un
til our fourth wave went over the
parapet. They'll have to vamp up
something a bit more convincing to
soothe the fatherland over this show,
won't they?"
Care of the Dead.
One little man. who had tried rnn-
clusions with a German grenade and I
had lett the ground with fourteen
wounds, but in remarkably high
spirits, expressed the conviction that
the German grenade was "not a
bloomin' patch on ours." He and a
comrade told a 'Story of visiting a
"cave of the dead," so circumstantial
in its details as to leave no doubt of
its truth. While exploring a huire
shell crater they discovered a cavity
leading out of one side of it, and, en
tering the hole, found it led to what
once had been an. exceptionally large
and deep dugout, probably a battalion
headquarters.
By the light of their electric torches
they explored the dugout and became
convinced that one of the British
heavy shells must have penetrated it
and exploded therein. The floor of
the dugout,, they asserted, was posi
tively crowded with dead Germans
of whom a large number were offi
cers. None of the huddled bodies
showed, any signs of a wound. The
terrific concussion of the great shell
exploding in that confined space ap
parently had killed all of them. One
German had a telephone receiver in
his hand.
One Takes Four.
A Canadian corporal, whose story
was confirmed by an officer who fig
ured prominently in the incident, de
scribed how four men captured 100
Germans in a dugout after the British
advance had passed beyond them.
The corporal, who was wounded, first
dropped a bomb into the dugout, and
then, hearing no response, led the !
way down a long flight of steps lead
ing to a considerable cavern. Hearp
ing voices in the darkness, they
dropped a couple more bombs while
on the way down, and, on entering
the cavern, lighted a candle.
At this a murmur arose from a
group of Germans huddled at the far
end of the dugout, standing with their
hands above their heads. The candle
went oat and the British officer shout
ed that if any man moved he would
"bomb them all to glory." The candle
was relighted and one man of the
four Britishers was sent to the en
trance to the dugout while he ordered
the Germans to advance in groups of
three and pile up their arms, warning
them that he would hurl a bomb into
the crowd if any made a hostile move.
By threes they were all marched up
into daylight and dispatched tp the
rear, the orderly at the entrance keep
ing watch of them to see thai they
moved in the right direction and
warning them that he would shoot
them if they undertook to escape. In
the end the whole lot of prisoners,
was safely dispatched on the road to
more, certain captivity.
Startling.
Colonel Henry Watterson, who makes
a collection of queer ads. and typographi
cal blunders, says that one of the oddest
transpositions of the types that ever came
within his observation was In a New York
paper that used to print Its shipping news
on the same page with the obituaries. One
morning a long list of respectable names
were set forth under the heading, "rajjsed
"Through Hell 4late Yesterday."Ncw York
Times.
now. uar here tew days Only.
Pullman Car With Demonstrator Will Arrive
Monday Morning, May 14th
Government Indian Land Demonstration Car No. 10
THIEVES GROW RICH
OFF BRITISH ARMY
Organized System of Robbery
Costs English Government
Large Sums of Money.
MUCH LOOT IN TRANSIT
(Correspondence of the Associated Press,)
London, Apr;' 30. T.e annual loss
to the British army through petty
thievery and pilfering iA stores and
supplies has been , estimated at $25,
000,000. Some account of the man
lier in which this huge sum disap
pears is given by the auditor general
of army accounts.
The supervision of the auditor
general docs not extend to cases in
which waste has occurred through
carrying out some approved policy.
He is concerned only to point to the
leakages which occur in matters car
ried out contrary to or without
proper sanction'. He is therefore
touching only the fringe of war of
fice waste, but the cases he cites
cover a wide field.
Sulphur Kills Horses.
A lot of horses mysteriously disap
peared at Abbassia, leaving a deficit
of $30,000. A civilian foreman at
Romsey carelessly gave thirteen
horses an overdose of sulphur and the
horses died loss $4,000.
Pistols worth $1,750 were lost on the
way to Egypt. Troops smoking in a
barn in France set tire to the barn
and destroyed $2,000 worth of straw.
Scores of cases are cited where the
mysterious disappearance of blankets
has cost the army thousands of dol
lars. Condensed milk worth $1,000
disappeared from a cargo between
Alexandria and Sollom, owing to pil
fering by the mercantile marine
crews on board. Since the appoint
ment of conductors to accompany
ships these losses have virtually
Ceased.
Military clothing worth $1,000 was
sent to Winchester, where someone
who signed himself "Corporal
Barnes" took it over. The consign
ment was lost at this poitjt and so
was Corporal Barnes.
The Royal Highlanders show a de
ficiency of $14,500 which was errone
ously paid to them while at Dundee.
Eleven thousand empty petrol .tins
and cases were lost in transmit be
tween France and England, with a
nf ss ;nn n n,,.,.;., of
Prickles to Indian troops is responsi
ble tor a loss of $1,700.
Failure of the war office to prop
erly circulate a notice as to the fees
of doctors for examining Derby re
cruits cost $50,000.
There is naturally a heavy loss
shown on stores sent to Gallipoli, but
the accounts have been "accepted as
rendered", because it has been impos
sible to check the stores, which were
removed to any ship that was ready.
Omaha's War News
Guy Miller, elevator man in the
First National bank building, has
served time in one of the cavalry
units of the country, having seen serv
ice on the Mexican border. When
mustered out he went onto the re
serve list and since then has been fol
lowing a peaceful occupation.
Miller, however, is now going back
into the service. When and where,
however, he does not know. Friday
he received instructions from the War
department to be ready to respond to
the call to arms, the instructions indi
cating that he would receive his billet
during the next ten days. He is an
Omaha boy.
At the Omaha naval recruiting sta
tion there were 141 enlistments last
week and all of the men have gone to
the Great Lakes training station.
While the enlistments for the period
were not up to the record, they were
satisfactory.
The naval enlistment week com
mences Friday morning and ends the
following Thursday -night. Few of the
men remain here long after enlist
ment. Usually as soon as they sign
up they are furnished transportation
and on the first train out, going to the
station at Chicago.
Two applicants for enlistment in
'he marine corps arrived vestcr
day. Harry W. Montgomery, Marion
and Leo' .Neigcio, Chicago. They
passed the examination and were sent
on to Port Royal. N. C, where they
will go into training:
It is contended that Uncle Sam's
work in the marine corps is lighter
than that required of men in the navy.
The marine corps men man the
smaller boatsv and are frequently
called upon to do duty on land.
W. C. Brown, Treasurer
Of Iowa, Dies Suddenly
Des Moines, May 12. W. C.
Brown, state treasurer of Iowa, died
at his home here today. He was
taken ill suddenly yesterday in his
office. Heart disease and kidney
trouble arc believed to have caused
his deatli.
Pullman car equipped with maps, plats, agriculture and geological
reports and display! of producti ia charge of skilled demon. tralors,
now on track at Great Western freight house, 16th and Mason Sts.
Hours 9 a. m. to 12 m., 1 p. m. to Si30 p. m.. 7 p. m. to 9 p. m.
POULTRY and
jOULTRY
Ancoius.
SlNCl.K-COM I) im t lttt Anctn ckk fr
hatrhlng. Winner at Omaha. Write for
muting and plica liat. Kmll TallHt, 6336
MiKlnlry Ml,, Ho ..hoi., Nob.
SH'rTi7KDAN'(N AS 'I'lIK (lit K AT KOO
producer. Mia. M. J. (Julia tin. Ashland,
Neti.
ANLVNAS. SlMlI.h, COMB OMAHA AND
Kearney State show winner; !. I1.7&.
JJi.1) mm, UK. J. R Pop, Unduly, Nob.
Lanshan.
"Pl'MS ltlOtMi 14 LACK I.ANOS.iAN BOiJS.
15. 11.50; $;i.B0, ll0; Inrg Toulouse loose
fKKS. tZ'jc. Mrs. HI nun Kruui. Arlington.
N'h'
PUItKOiRKU while Laiigrthaiia PBiES. Jl'.&lf
per 15. Kdward Patca. Crcltrhton. Neb.
'ULAi'K LANUSHAN IXIUd. 'JAKIS
Hrht.k. Walnvt. NVh.
HNU JU.ACK LANtiHHAN cockerels for
stilo Mitrnaret MeClune, Wallace. Kan.
Leghorns.
SINGLE CimbHiiff Hint' While T.ohonm.
P, T. Ri'iIh. Huff Orpington, Rllvtr and
While Wynndntte enga t! por 100. Kxpr's
pt'ppntrl buliniri of nonmin. EKJT rovords
up (o SSti. Missouri, 8tnrr & NewHrk
contests. Not at Home! O, B. llennlnR,
Mend. Nrb.
KtldS PROM SINQI.JC-COMH WIUTB
Lpjihorns. br1 to lay, prlM-wlnnlng itock;
prlcea rcunonuble; expreee prepaid. Mr.
Ohnii. Crons, Soxtonvlllff. Wla.
B A R RON tr"vh id" O' 8lfKST LAT E R S ;
Engllnh White Leghorn egga reasonable.
Andy Mlkkelnon, Vtlca, Neb.
li'OK BALK Roue-Comb White Leghorn
egga, 4.50 per 100. Mrs. Anna Nelson,
tlcnon. Neb., Route No. S.
YOUNG'S STRAIN SINflLB COMR
White Leghorn; 16 eggs, SI; 100 eggs. 5.
ROSE-COMU W1UTK LKUHORN KUQS
I4.&Q per hundred. Mrs. Anna Nelson, Ge
noa, Neb. Route 3. .
A TRIO of thoroughbred jingle comb White
Leg home. Writs Anton Bnckora, 8321! 61st
Ave., Hoii5on.
ROB'E-CO MB 11 R O WN LEtlll OR N S 7 5
cents per setting, 14-GO por hundred. F. L.
Hayek. Ltnwood. Neb.
H INt iLE-C UM n WHITE LEGHORN
eggi, $4.1.0 por hundred; 8fi per cent guar
anteed fertile, J. 11. Plettner, Kxeter, Neb.
ruLLriL66n sinulk-comu brown
Leghorn Eggs $1, 15; I. 100. Mrs. Oscar
It. BoydHton. Nellgh. Nfl.
S. C. BITKK LKOIIORN EliUS. RANGE
flock; IB, II; 60, $3; 100, IB; muted pen. 15,
$1.60. C. O. Lundeen, Harvard, Neb.
EGGS Buff Leghorn. 14.00 106; Buff Rocks,
$l.fi0, 17; I5.U0, 105. Psn, 13.00, 17. Al
bert Nagcntfant, llowolls, Neb.
Minofcaa.
SINGLE-COMB 11LACK MINORCAS
Eggs. $6 per 100. Chas. Dee, Genoa, Neb.
Orpingtons.
Pt'RE-BRED eggs. 8. C. Buff and While
Orpington, White Leghorn; excellent lay
ers, $G per 100. White Pekin ducks, 12 for
$1.26. Mrs, John Wttten. Klrkman, la.
SINGLE-COMB BUFF ORPINGTON
eggs. 16 per 100. Mrs. Henry Martin, Ed-
dyvllte. Neb.
S. C. BUFF Orpington eggs; the big, heavy
boned kind; nothing but clear Buff. 1$
for $1.50; 50 for $4. J. IX rollock,
Bloomfleld, Neb.
SINGLE-COMB WHITE ORPINGTON
eggs; fifteen. $1; fifty, $3; hundred, $6. J.
A. Russell, Corning. Iowa.
mMlLECOAlB BinF ORPlNrSTON BOOST
$1 for 15, $5 per 100; Pennington strain.
V. M. Blakeslee. Wahoo, Nnb,
BUFF ORPINGTON EGGS FOR HATCH
ing from choice selected stock, $1, 15; $5,
100. Mra. Harry Overturff. Llbortyville, la.
SINGLE-COMB W 1 IPTE "ORPI NO TON
cggH, $1, 15; $4.50, 100; Kellerstrass strain.
William Havckost, Hooper, Neb.
S. C. BUFF ORPINGTONS, 100 EGGS.
$5.00; 60, $3.00; 15, $1.25. Helens Pierce,
Greenwood. Neb.
B"iJ FFOR P ING'PON EOG S. C ENTS
earn. Hena weigh as high us eight pounds.
Mrs. Tockey. Silver Creek, Neb.
SINOLE-COMH BCFF ORPINGTON EGGS
50, $3; 100, $5. Jos. Konicek, Clurkson.
Neb., Route 1.
SINULE-COMB WHITE ORPINGTON
eggs for liatehing, $l.Jt par 15, fi per 100.
Wm. Langbphn, Avoca, la,
buff "bRpTNtmJiFsrfu
dozen. Red 6300.
BUFF ORPINGTON eggs. 75c dozen; fine
stock; wlntiir layer. Red b.100.
BUFF Orpington eggs for setting. Phone
.Douglas 52S8. 2124 Douglas.
BUFF ORPINUTON eggs,
line
aiofg; TU'lmor layers,
Red
Rhode Island Reds.
HARRISON'S Non-slttlns Single -Comb
Reds CiiO-egir strain). Mating list gives
facts free. Harriaon, "The Redman,"
Stromsburg, Nob.
RHODE ISLAND R ED H ROSE
tingle-oonib eggs, $5 per 100; alio
special mating at $2 per setting.
AND
some
P. G.
Fleselmnn. Box 1, Hlclcitm.i, Neb.
SI NO LK COM B B H ODE IS LA ND R ED
e?gs for hatching; $1.50 for 15, $6 per hun
dred; fflrm range; good laying strain. Clara.
S. Lanalng, Kddyvllle, Nob,
THOROUHBRED ROHCbMB RHODE
Inland Red cockereli. Kggfi, $1.50 letting.
Claude Mussulman, Lyons. Neb.
EG C IS" F R OM C fl Oi C EDAR KR E D "AND
heavy-boned Slngl-Cmb Reds at 12 and.
$:t per 15. H. R, 8ehaefern, llowclls. Neb.
ROlBT-lJo M Bl E DB-
$2.60, 30; $5, 100. Dark red. .1. Burton,
Falrtteld, Neb.
ROSE-COMB REDS EGGS FROM .BEST
pens, $2 per 15; flock. $4 per 100. Glen
Wilson, Bliilr. Neb.
DARK ROSE-COMB RED EGGS, FOUR
mated pens; range flock, $ti per 100. Esther
Nelson. Phillips. Nrb.
EGGS ROSE-COMC REDS, $4.50 PER
100, utility stock, farm range. Mrs. Edd
Dllley. Friend. Neb.
SINGLE-COMB RED EGC.H FROM FINE
laying strain; ood color. Prices reasonable.
Allmi Ely, Elkhorn, Nob.
SIN(ILK-C(JM1"iTe7EG0S SELECTED
pen, $1.60 per 15; flock, $4, 100, from PIo
noBr Rpda. Mrs. John Hull, Valley, Neb.
t 0 p "notch single-combpjiode
Island Reda EgKs, $4 per 100, $2.60 per 50.
W. E. Brlggs. Springfield, Neb.
ROSE-CO MB RIIOJJK ISLAND REDS
Eggs, $2.60 per U, $4.60 per 100 V. M
Shitve.-, Brunlng, Nob.
littsiijfv"
1
i
m
land direct from the
gov-
POULTRY
FINK OntiT IsyiUK lUuU iMlitlut lUil BKS
for liHlohliig, ChII Wor-ster K9T.
R. C. RKOS fuss. $1 lr 1!
Theo Trl.t1, orlMns. Nsl,
'KGGS FROM lltVlN'S IN V INC I Ri M
iNtre.l Plymouth Rooks, Mtt-lmnptl, imrrow
liarrcit kind C ttt won th blus notions Ht
Hie Nelrnnka Hints shows 1M6 suil 117.
Kkrs. ID mul $$ per 15, from flnt umtlnirn.
Stli.fnftioii ttiiariinleitiV W. A. Irvin. Wit-ti-r.
N. It
wniTK HOt'Ka. Urge, vigorous, farm
rulstil. khh1 In vera; vfgm. $1 40 ttlttnc, $6
for 100; sntisfrollou gusrsnteod N. W,
Ilnllry, lloniirk, la.
KtiiiS Harri-il Kioki RrstlU-y strsln, well
lisrrrtl. largp -oonfld, IsyiliR ttrttin, $1.'JS
tr lb, $5 cor IttQ. Mrs, Clicater Pahlof.
KltKiiKiit. lu,
HAItltKO HOCK I'KK froin'tou-tiolch uul
liy slo-k. I. ilt roi lb, $ti for 100; nothing
hut the lOHt. AMqulst Urn's., Box O.
KIoitiu'O, Neb.
CLASSY liiurotl Hoiks, farm rnnsa hrod to
win stul lay. $5, 100; $S. 60; $1 t!.r, H. Fw
KMHwrs from pen. $3. to. Mrs. C V. Soa-lo-l(,
Noolu, In
HiLiA.it kst hurrTd7tocTr(rdly strain),
rnwit and, W'hltu Indian Bunnor ducks,
KltRfl, IDO. $&: settling. II. D. T. liana
Crtt Nb.
THOMPSON'S HINliLKT BAR H K D
Rock exits. $1, 100; pen, $LM, 16; corkerel
mated, Isrgs typs. K. B Boyer. PaPts
t'onter, la.
A M R L' o"j'LY.MOV)TH BOOK EOOS FOR
hatchinv; also Silver-Spangled Hamhurg
abbs, Ht IS pr hundred. Chas. Voas Sou.
Huhimrd, N.-lt.
WH1TW rLYVOUTIi ROOK K008 FROM
high storing stook (Klshels), farm -100,
; 60. $;i; 16, $1,60, C. I. Shaw, Plain-
ViftW, Nob.
BABltliO "l'lcgixrragood, hflaltUy,
farm flnok; p.- IS. II. SO; por 10U, $. M.
S. MfTolHntor, Boavor Crnslng, Nh.
UAniiiJlVltorKeKKa. il. 16; li 80; $11, U;
IG, 100. Satisfied customers II stats.
Mrs. Oeorse. Schulis, Yuian, Nttb.
THOMPSON atrnin Uarrsd Books, best pen
eggs, $1.50 per 1&. ID por 100, prspald.
T. H. Kaldpnberg, Fslla, la.
FfNK stork Itnrrrd Bock hfns and cooker
els, bIko sfttlng hens with 16 eggs for
$i'. U22 fuss Ht
Wit IT K BOOK eggn from priae-wlnning
stock, 11.25 per 16; $6 ftr H0. Louis
Wllkon. Rout 1. Columbus, Nb,
BAB It HO PLYMOUTH ROl'K 13UGS KOR
hstr;: lug tho better kind $3. $R and U
per lf. lr. Fllppln, Rtromsburg, Neb.
WHITE ROCKS BLUE-RIBBON WIN
ners in four statos. Send for mating ltt.
WIIMnms Poultry Ifsrm, Cedar Bluffs, Neb.
WHiTIfl Rock egK ptire-tireil. good laytira,
$1.60 per 16, $6 jsr 1M. Fr d Kroeger,
Carroll, la.
"BUFF BOOK KOGS-piCN HKA'DISD BY
prize-winning cockerel, $3 per 1$; farm
flock, $1,60 per 16. $5 per 100. B. F. Max
well, Liberty, Neb.
HU1H-QUALITY BARRKD ROCK KOOS.
$4 per 100; good laying strain. Ben John
eon, Fairfield, Neh.
1 A BY chicks," pure-bred'sTni t e' RooksTTic
cHrh; Barred Rocks. 1 2c, Ueorgo Wolcott,
Central City, Neh.
EGOS Fancy Burred Rocks Winter layers,
$1.26 and $.,.60 setting. Ciyda Karel,
Clarkson, Nrb.
tyyandottes.
SILVKR-l.ACICb WYANOOTTlS EOOH,
Aristocrat strsln. Two settings, 1.76; fifty
eKRS, $2.60. Airs. Henry Drengula, Srrlbnor.
Neb.
OR KEN LAWN POULTRY FARM, RK
grtl While Wyandottos, pen 1, 16 eggs. iL'.f.O;
pens 'i and 3, $1.60, or 16 per 100. Henry
Kail. Fairmont, Neb.
"W iilTK WYANDt TT B KARMTl A ST KOCl 9
for hatching from poms of the best Whits
Wyandot Un In America. Oscar L. Book,
Council muffs. la.
IF' YOU WANT Till: BKST SiLVBK WY
andotles. Barred Rocks or White-Crested
BUck Polish, breeding stock or eggs, writs
to William Nelers. Box C, Csscade, lows.
"PAHT It l" lid K WY AlsThOTT B EdoS, I L60
for lfi; $ti for 100 H L). Van Hoosen.
Stromnliurg, Neb.
"TmPB It 1 A LwTTfT (TWYANOTTK KOOS
from selected pet), 12 for 15. $tt .per 100.
M. ifogensen, Fullerlon, Neb.
Rtrs k -TT6m n " w i i itb wy a nootte
eitKS, $G hundred, 76 cents fifteen. John II.
Horst. Wlsner, Neb,
w"i('iTK "W Y AN IKHT BfrEt 108." 1 P KR
15. Jfi jicr 100. Mrs, Clias. Dlekmanti, Ed
gHi', Noli.
WHITE WYANDOTTB KGOS, 11 SKT
tlnff, M.r.O hundred. Mrs, John Brlggs.
Glenvil, Neb.
BUTTERCUPS YOIFR OPPORTUNITY.
BOOKLET.
WM. FREIRE. LA CROSSE, WIS.
BLUE WY AN 1 OTT ES EgRS for hatchiiif.
Write Jasper A. Uauntt, Vincennes. I ml.
Miscellaneous
ios'OIl"HATCHINU-54 VARlTIKS,
chickens. Bronte, Whits Holland, Bourbon
Red turkeys; Toulouse, Embden, African
China B'ae; Peklu, Rouen, Runner, IMusoovy
ducks; Guineas; catalogue free. Theodore
Franz, Box II, Mankato, Minn.
OUS F Kli AT(!H 1 NaT"'TATING LISTS
free. SlnKle-comb Buff Orpingtons, Toulnus)
gnese, Indian Runner ducks. Petor Brehm,
Harvrtrfl, Neb.
15 ARK and White Cornish
fliiles. Table Rock, Nh.
egff-
OVI'M KRS Incubator and hover for ad la.
Walnut 29'. 4.
KlitiS ill VAltlETlUS. KR L' E BOOK,
ye Bros.. Blair, Neb. Box 3,
rillCKlCNs AND 10 geese for sate. 317
N. 5:id. Mrs. 1,1ml.
Ducks, Geese, Turkeys, Etc.
z lutEKos oFhuoksr on ickenh"
turkeys. Catalogue free. Poultry Judge
Urchin. Hnrvnrd. Neb.
IMilAN BIINNEIt LUK'KS EGUH FOB
Bb good stock, .eiiHonable prices. Wrlle n.e
your whiiIh, Kd Crosier. Oakdalc, Neb.
-"bo'i'i bhon" RE lTf J 1 IKV) YEtiG s f risT
Henry MokcUc, Lindsay, Neb,
POULTRY AN D PET STOCK
PIGEONS,
finuab Journal Trowta on feeding1, mar
koiing and general uianaguinent of pig
eon for stpiab ralsltiK. Illustrated. Pub
lished monthly. Kinplu lOd. Four months'
trial. 2r.n. American Squab Journal. Pept
FOK SALE Mated t'nrneaux (ilgcons. Get
my tirlti'S. BnJ. Owens, Blair. Neb.
TVO creainT'olored Angora cats for sale,
one mala and one female, full grown.
Son of Former President
Taft Enlists as Private
Washington, May 12. Charles P.
Taft, the 19-year-old son of former
President Taft, has enlisted as a
private in the artillery.
Get This Free
A fifty-page illustrated booklet on the planting and
care of the home vegetable garden will be sent free to
any reader of The Bee. This book is an official publica
tion of the United States government. It covers the gar
den from artichokes to turnips. It tells you what to
plant and how to plant it, gives cultural hints and a
planting table for more than fifty of the most important
vegetables for the home garden, tells you all about the
proper tools, fertilizers, etc., etc. Contains diagrams
showing how to lay out your garden. You need this
book to do your share in the big campaign for raising
more food.
AJWUU'. 'I'll
THE OMAHA BEE INFORMATION BUREAU,
Washington, D. C.
Enrtosed ffnrf h two-cent itimp, for which you will plfts send mi, ntlrely
frf, The Garden Book.
Nmti . . .
Street AddrfM
Cilr
PET STOCK
Facts for Poultry Raisers
Green food is Kn.'tly relished liv
all kinds ot poultry, ft is valuable,
not so much for the food nutrients
oiil.iined, but as an aid in keening
1 1 . , , ,, i nr, IWii.t
(;r,., ton,l ,l. -iv ,lnr . ,h
Green food also gives color to the egg
yolk.
bo far as possible Krccn food should
he grown on the poultry runs. For'
summer feeding (lie sowing of the
runs to wheat the previous fall and
oats in the spring, followed bv rape,
buckwheat or soybeans, gives good
results. In winter succulent food can
he supplied by various means. Cab
bage and large beets arc perhaps the
best, when prices will permit, but
steamed clover or alfalfa can be util
ized. Some people get a heavy stand
of rye in the fall, cut this in the win
ter when the chickens arc not per
mitted to run, and feed it in the pens.
Knsilage, chopped very fine, is also
used. Other forms of succulent food
are carrots, turnips, onions and pota
toes (boiled), when the prices of these
vegetables are sufficiently low. Tur
nips and onions are said to flavor the
egg. Soaked beet pulp can be used
as a green food.
A popular source of green food is
sprouted oats. It requires consider
able labor to keep the flock supplied
with sprouted oats. The sprouting is
done by the use of trays two or three
inches deep, with holes in the bottom
for drainage. The trays should be
kept in a room at a temperature of
70 degrees. A half-inch of earth
should be placed in the bottom of the
trays. A naif-inch of oats which have
been soaked in warm water over night
is placed on the earth. The oats
should then be covered wtih a half
inch of sand and the travs kent moist.
When the oats are three inches long
they shoulJ be fed. As a green food
sprouted oats cannot be excelled, and
the only objection ttv-rheir use i the
great amount of lahor required and
the necessity of having a satisfactory
riom- in which to do the sprouting.
Use Common Sense With Incubator
Chicki.
Plenty of fresh air and an unlimited
amount of exercise with the applica
tion of a little common sense will do
much to overcome the prejudice
against the incubator chick.
The tendency to consume large
quantities of food probably causes the
death of more incubator chicks than
any other one thing. When first
hatched they possess ravenous appe
tites and a faculty for eating every
thing that is injurious. In the natura.
state they discover their food fre
quently, hut in small quantities.
Another cause of disappointment
and disaster with the incubator chick
is a lack of sufficient warmth. The
yolk of the egg, which is nature's
method of supplying the newly
hatched chick with nourishment, is
absorbed slowly during the first few
days of life. If for any reason the
chick becomes chilled this process of
absorption is checked and the yolk
sours, causing a condition very simi
lar to white diarrhea.
The incubator chick has much to
learn and he has no mother to teach
him.. But if he is handled carefully he
soon learns where to find food, water
and warmth. He learns to scratch for
himself and to select his food proper
ly. It is said that one of the hardest
things for Ihe motherless chick to
Irani is to come in out of the rain.
Keep Egss As You Would Milk.
Gather eggs often and keep them
in a cool, dry place all the time until
they are sold.
To produce first class eggs all con
ditions must be right. Eggs, like milk,
should be cooled just as soon as pos
sible after being produced, should be
kept cool and should be marketed
as soon as possible. Like piilk and
butter, eggs become tainted by odors,
and should be kept away from onions,
turnips, kerosene, or anything else
having a heavy odor. ,
Hints on House Construction.
Four square feet of floor space
should be allowed for each hen.
Have from eight to fifteen inches of
roosting space to each hen.
Allow one nest to every four or five
hens.
Where muslin is used for ventila
tion purposes, one square foot of mus
lin should be placed on the south side
for every fifteen square feet of floor
space, if the house is fifteen feet wide.
If the house is ten feet wide, on the
south side use one square foot of mus
lin to every twenty square feet of
floor space and if the house is twenty
feet wide, on the south side use one
square foot of muslin to every ten
square feet of floor space.
The foregoing rules will also apply
in the use of the shutter front method
of ventilation.
The height of the tops of the win
dows, if placed on the south side.
should be a little less than one-halt as
high as the house is wide.
Glass should be placed in the house
at the rate of one square foot to every
fifteen square feet of floor space.
If the chickens are yarded. 150
square feet df yard space should be
allowed for each bird.
The square house is the most eco
nomical to construct.
Garden Book.
--" 1 MWWMV,
"
'
8U
Capon Industry on the Increase.
The capon industry is sure to Atp
velop rapidly owing to -the prevailing
' inci-uuuuuiiB ainiuaia.
. ''r.oui the standpoint of meat pro.
diiction it is just as important to make
a capon out of a cockerel as it is to
make a steer out of a bull calf, or
barrow from a young boar. It ii
pure waste to allow the young roos
ter to become slaggy.
Caponizing has the same effect
upon the disposition of the male
chicken that castration has upon the ,
stallion. It renders him more tracta
ble; less nervous and excitable, and
so easier to handle from every stand
point. The true capon will seldom
crow or light, takes kindly to confine
ment and will even brood chicks.
The performing of this simple oper
ation also affects the amount and
quality of the meat. The capon
makes more rapid gains than the
rooster, and makes them more eco
nomically. At the same time his
flesh remains as soft and palatabtb
when he was a two-pound "spring."
The operation necessary to produce
capons is simple and can be per
formed by anyone after a little prac
tice. The necessary instruments may
be purchased from any poultry sup
ply house or veterinary instrument
company at from $2 to $S a set Full
instructions for performing the oper
ation may be had free of charge from
the poultry department of any agri
cultural college. . -Where
capons are raised in lare
numbers it is now possible to ship
them direct to large cities where there .
is a ready market.
Disinfect the Incubator,
The incubator should be disinfected
after each hatch. Often after a hatch
Inch shows no symptoms of disease.
the contamination left in the machine
under a temperature of 103 degrees
will develop a culture of bacteria
which will destroy the foUowing
hatch.
Anv disinfectant, such as kerosene
or other oils, should b: avoided. The
most common method of disinfecting
machines is to use a 3 per cent solu
tion nf anv nonular stock din or crude
carbolic acid. The interior of the ma
chine should be saturated with this
solution, the lamp should then be
lighted and the door closed so that
the fumes will penetrate all parts of
the machine. .
In disinfecting the machine a com
mon whisk broom can be used. By
this method the solution can be
thrown into the corners and against
the back of the machine. When for
maldehyde is used as a disinfectant
it is necessary to air the machine
thoroughly before setting the eggs.
If fiossihl? the machine should be
placed in the sun for a few hours, so
that the sun can shine directly into
the egg chamber, as sunshine is one
of the best germicides that can be
found.
Ducklings Need Little Cart.
Voting ducklings need little atten
tion if given a dry roosting place and
the right kind of feed.
The less ducklings are handled the
better. Their chief requirements are
plenty of green grass, sand and fresh
water.
As a rule it is not advisable to set
duck eggs in an incubator. They re
quire more moisture and ventitation
than hen eggs. The recent rage over
the Indian runner duck has caused the
neglect of the meat producing type.
Lp sjuiupa tb Onion.
So longer ! tin onion breath plebeian.
And If a neighbor tatka of having had
corned beef and cabbage, for dinner, do not
think Ihe Inns of him. For onions, with
fiabbitre and potatoea, hav fans iky high.
Incidentally. Muerkraut and plffi' feet nn
longer are "common" fare.
Cabbage h gone up 1,000 per cent.
Onlona have gone up 1,300 per cent (In two
year) and aauerkraut 400 per cent, though
cniTimtiilon men eay they are not able, to
obtain quotations. The Irish potato In
quoted from 13 to 12.20 a buehel to Job
ber! agalnnt 11.10 to 11.15 last year and
it to DO oenla In HIS.
Tabbave laat year at thfa time aold at
11.1 to Sib a ton, but now hae reached a
jop prlue when a email lot la aold on a haala
of $130 a inn.
Sauerkraut laat year aold for (3.60 a bar
rel. ' Thla ifr It la quoted at f to a barrel,
but broke re have defied any one buy tt at
that price. Ht. Loula Poat-PlepaTcn.
POULTRY PROFIT
-"THE LEE WAY"
The ' Lee Way" is a systematic way
of handling poultry for best health,
growth, productiveness, and a profit
every month of the year. It consists
in following a few simple rules and in
the use of the following time-tested
poultry helps. It costs two cents per
lien per month to follow the "Lee
Wav.1' One extra egg pays the cost
THE LEE LIBRARY TCffyw3
scribed ill the Lee Library of five
booklets put up ill a neat package and
distributed free by Lee Supply Deal
ers or mailed postpaid for 5 cents
stamps.
LEE'S LICE KILLER
and savers. Applied to roosts, etc., (a s
liquid) it quickly gets rid of lice and
mites; also scaly leg. -No handling of
fowls. On the market 22 years.
LEE'S EGG MAKER teVoZSf:
menr. It supplies all needed elements
aside from grain, green food, grit and
water and it does Bring more eggs.
Manv California ranches have used it
steadily for 15 years.
GERMOZONEi!:,'?raandrebm0ewdJ
fur colds, roup, canker, bowel disor
ders, chicken-pox, etc. Best thing for
chick diarrhea; prevents contagion
from fowl to fowl through the drink;
kills in the crop, germs picked tip with
Ihe food.
EGG-O-HATCHSK
better hatches of stronger chicks. A
liflv-cent package treats 600 eggs.
EGG-01ATUMise,e!ri
with Egg-o-Latum in April or May
cannot be told from eggs tinder s
week old the following January. Eas
ily applied and simply kept in egg
case or carton in cellar. Jar sufficient
for 50 dozen eggs, 50 cents postpaid.
There is a dealer handling Lee
Poultry supplies at most every city or
town. If not at yours, write for full
particulars, delivery terms, prices, egg
book, etc. State if you can handle
agency. Geo. H. Lee Co, 602 Let
Bldg.. Omaha. Neb. ...