Omaha daily bee. (Omaha [Neb.]) 187?-1922, May 13, 1917, NEWS SECTION, Page 2, Image 2

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THE OMAHA SUNDAY BEE: MAY 13, 1917.
JUNKERS PUSHING
FIGHT ON HOLLWEG
Organ Says Kaiser Must Elim
inate Chancellor if He
Would Save His
Throne.
Copenhagen (Via London), May 2.
The Germania, organ of the clerical
party, indicates that Chancellor von
Bethmann-Hollweg docs not intend to
make a statement with regard to
peace terms before the ' Reichstag,
having finally decided that it was in
advisable at the present time.
' Meanwhile the conservatives are
growing more desperate as the work
of the constitutional revision commit
tee proceeds without any intervention
from the government to dam the
wave of reform which threatens the
political influence of the junkers.
"Where is Hindenburg to raise the
fallen kaiser's banner again and de
fend the rights of the throne?" cries
Prince Zu Salm-Horstmar in the
' Prussian House of Lords. The prince
is president of the German Naval
league and one of the war horses of
the conservative old guard.
The South German Gazette, the or
gan of the south German cftnserva
tives, suggests sending a deputation
to the emperor to warn him that his
throne is in danger unless he dis
misses Von Bethmann-Hollweg.
The suggestion is taken up by the
Kreuz Zeitung, representing the Prus
sian junkers and the military aristoc
racy, the Deutche Zeitung and the
Refchsbote.
Other conservative papers echo the
cry that the Hohenzollern throne is
tottering unless a new chancellor
comet to suppress the reform move
ment with an iron hand. In spite of
all Dr. Von Bethmann-Hollweg still
seems very strong and there is no in
dication that the emperor's confidence
in him is seriously shaken.
Burglar, Surprised in Act,
Fights Way to Freedom
As Edward Criss, 1901 South Thir-1
teenth street, entered the front door
of his home at 10:30 Friday night, a
negro prowler entered the back door.
Criss hurried to the kitchen and the
two men grappled. Around the room
they swung, knocking chairs and other
furniture over. The intruder wrested
free and ran away. '
"He was a powerful fellow," said
Criss, who is nursing facial and bodi
ly bruises aa the result of the' en
counter .
; i i
Hawk a Garden Cop.
A. R. Kaltimlll, a rtlred drucslit, who
lives on a term near Bomerfltld, Pa., baa a
novel policeman to keep tho chtoksns out
of bli varden. Last winter Rathmlll set a
trap tor muskrata. An Inqutsltlvs squirrel
put In the trap and down swooped an Im
mense hawk to oat. the unfortunate squir
rel, but whllo thus snsased ths hawk got
Met In the trap and aluoa has been
captivity.
The hawk waa not seriously Injured, and
on beliif taken to the Rathmlll home, where
he was fed and kindly treated, ho aooo
became a pet of the family. As Ions aa hs
Is furnished plenty of fresh meat the bawk
seems happy and contented In bis con
finement. Ho Is prevented from flying
away by a small chain fastened to one of
his less and fastened to a post. .
Recently chickens got Into Mm Rath.
mill's gardsn and threatened to destroy her
' crops. Then a bright Idsa occurred to her
Hhe steked ths hawk out In the garden,
making him policeman, and after that not a
-hen, not even a bravo old roostsr, set foot
In the garden again. Philadelphia Record.
t Tho Same Offense.
There wns rerently brought befora a
poMce magistrate In the south an old darky
who hnd fsllen foul of a bulldog while In
ths act of entering the hen houso of ths
dc-ir a owner.
"flnn't I glvs you ten days last month
for tills seme offense" asked ths mails
trats. 'It wns tho same hen bouss you
were trying to get Into. What have you
got to say for yourself T' 1
The darky seemed perplossd. "To
honah," hs sstd, "yo' asnt ms to ths ehaln
gang to' trying to steal aoms ebloksns,
lldn't yo'?"
"Yes, that was ths eharga." '
"An. don't ds law say yo aan't be
charred twice with do sama offenseT"
"Thai no man ehalt be twloo placed In
jeopardy for tho tdenttcat not, yea,"
"Dcr, yo' honor,, youras gotta let ms
sy), suh. t was after do earns chickens,
auh." Philadelphia Ledger.
Britain Serves Warning
On Munitions Strikers
London, May 12. The govern
ment issued a grave warning to
munition workers tonight, saying
that it cannot permit strikes to
continue and aggravate the delay
in the production of munitions
Engi.-.eers are striking in various
parts England
All loyal citizens, therefore, are
called upon to resume work im
mediately and the government
gives notice that all persons incit
ing to the stoppage of work on .
munitions are liable to conviction
for an offense entailing life servi
tude. The notice says the stoppage ot
work was clearly unauthorized by
the trade unions.
MAY WHEAT PRICE
PUT AT $3.18 BY
CHICAGO BOARD
(Continued from Pago One.)
ago. They had wanted the actual
Brain, but finding that the bottoms
necessary to carry it abroad were not
available, they reduced their holdings
and by force of circumstances took a
handsome speculative profit.
They contracted tor delivery ot
further wheat in July and September
and the status of their deals in these
months is not definitely known, save
that they already have a-big profit on
paper in both options.
Does Not Stop Speculation.
The elimination of May contracts
by no means eliminates speculation in
grains. The action of the board,
while not interfering with the free
dom of contracts on the part of either
individuals or governments, compels
those requiring wheat for immediate
consumption to make purchases from
farmers or grain dealers rather than
through the medium of a contract for
future delivery on the noor ot tne ex
change.
Mr. ratten was asked wnat action
was eontemDlated to prevent a re
petition in July of the May situation.
inat remains tor tne iuture to de
cide," he said.
Kansas City Stops May Trading.
Kansas Citv. Mav 12. New trading
in May wheat on the local board of
trade has been discontinued under the
terms of a resolution adopted today
by the board of directors. It was ex
plained that the action was taken
solely as a patriotic move and with
the idea of en-aneratinff with the ffov-
ernment in the national crisis.
Minneapolis Continues.
Minneaoolie. Mav 12. The board
of directors of the Minneapolis
Chamber of Commerce, at a special
meeting today, decided to continue
trading in May wheat
Aged Woman Burned to Death.
Beatrice. Neb. May 12. (Special
Telegram.) Mrs. Frank Fisher of
Barneston was burned to death last
evening while working about a bon
fire. Her clothing caught fire and was
burned from her body before assist
ance arrived. She waa 60 years of
age and leaves her husband and seven
children. ' .
; Bee Want Ads Produce Results.
The Berg Clothing Co.'s
NEW LOCATION
1415 Farnam Street
HcttS Hatch
I ALL WORK GUARANTEED
I Ss H. CLAY
IN Nstllls lldg.
mm ana
Third Flaw
Dr. Bradbury, a Soft Dentist
THE WORKERS OF THE WORLD
The men who climb to dizzy heights in busi
ness the top notchers in every realm of hu
man endeavor must have that steady nerve,
and physical endurance that come from living
in harmony with natural law. Get right with
nature by keeping your teeth in the best pos
sible condition. See that there are no cavi
ties, no gum affections, no hidden troubles.
For the people who da thing good teeth are
essential.
DR. BRADBURY ,
Is the Dentist who can help yon achieve your
aim in life. He can give you Dental Service
that will give you the nerve and physical en
durance that goes hand and hand with good
health.
Known hv Avar 1 1 A nnn sflttaftait natrrtna frti
nxixacuona, crowns ana Bridge work, nates, Hum Treatment
And the X-Ray to locate what is invisible to the Eye.
DR. BRADBURY, Dentist
28 Years In Omaha.
921-22 Woodmen of the World Building. Phono D. 1756.
14th and Farnam Sts., Omaha. Hours 8 to 6 Sundays, 10 to 12.
Wanted--A Man of Force
H who has demonstrated his ability to do the right
Jt thing at the right time without being urged or told.
a.
A Targe corporation wants this man, and, realizing
that only a high-caliber man will do, is ready and
willing to pay whatever he is worth.
(I Selling, promotion or financial experience is de-
sired, but not absolutely required, because a really
capable man the kind we want can adapt
himself.
d If you are over 30, broad-gauge, business trained
J and looking for an opportunity limited only by
. your ability, write fully regarding yourself and
give address in full. Interview will be arranged.
Address Box S771, Bee.
LAUDS AMERICAN WOMEN
FOR THEIR WORK.
H fv i
I m I , i -i.it. .1
CONTINUE ATTACK
ON WARM BILI
General Offensive of Affected
Interests Against Measure
Still Under Way in
Congress.
CARDINAL FARLEY UNDER
GOES OPERATION.
1ADY ABESJOEEit,
New York, May 12. Lady Aber
deen, wife of the former lord lieuten
ant of Ireland, who is at present in
New York in the interest of a central
ized international relief committee,
pays tribute to the women of the city
for their organization of the Militia
of Mercy.
The organization, which was formed
for the purpose of caring for the fami
lies of National Guardsmen called to
the war, is gaining in strength, and
Ladv Aberdeen has consented to
make a series of speeches in its support.
Washington, May 12. The general j
attack on the war tax bill continued j
today before the senate finance com-'
mittec. I
Taxation of parcel post packages
was advocated by representatives of
railroads and express companies whoi
contended it would be only fair to
tax packages sent by parcel post
which competes with- the express
companies.
The cent a pound tax and higher
duty on coffee was assailed by Frank
R. Seelye of Chicago, president of
the National Coffee Roasters' associ
ation. He suggested a flat 2 cent tax in
stead and declared many large retail
ers, such as mail order houses and
chain stores would escape the pro
posed tax. Lower retail coffee prices
because of a prospective large crop,
probably the greatest in the world's
history, were predicted by Seelye.
Representing interurban electric
roads, Arthur R. Brady of Anderson,
Ind., said the proposed taxes dis
criminates in favor of automobile
lines having established routes com
peting with electric roads.
The proposed tax on electric power
was opposed by Z. V. Taylor of the,
Indian Public Utilitie company as'
amounting to 5 per cent of gross rev
enues. The advertising taxes of the house
bill were attacked by E. A. Frost of
Chicago, representing poster and
fe (mi
; I ;J .:M
WHAT REASONABLE
MEANS ORY LAW
Attorney General Reed Has
Real Puzzling Question Put
Up to Him From Thurs
ton County.
CAKCJNAI FASUsSV
Considerable concern for Cardinal
Farley has been felt as a result of the
reports that he has been compelled to
undergo an operation. These reports,
coupled with his age and the fact that
for several weeks his health has not
been of the best, has caused some
anxiety. The exact nature of the
operation has not been made public.
It is said tj have been for abscess.
outdoor advertising interests. The
tax, he asserted, discriminates against
poster interests, by exempting news
paper and magazine advertising.
(From a Staff Correspondent.)
Lincoln, Neb., May 12. (Special.)
Will some good tried and true patriot
who knows what a- "reasonable
amount" of liquor is as set forth in
the new prohibition law, inform the
attorney general of Nebraska, so he
can answer correspondence received
covering that question.
Mr. Reed, , not being an imbiber,
does not consider himself competent
to judge. He said today that in his
opinion it would depend a great deal
on the age of an individual. Using
the insurance tables, a man 25 years
of age would naturally be expected to
live longer than a man 50 or 75 years
of age and therefore it would require
more liquor because ot the longer
duration of life.
The county attorney of Thurston
county writes that there is a certain
farmer in that country who since
April 27 is said to have stored in his
home 150 gallons of whisky and
twenty-six barrels of beer. He de
sires to know if that may be consid
ered a "reasonable" amount under the
law.
The attorney general is willing to
admit that it would be plenty for him,
but it might not even be a "reason
able" amount for some other people.
AUSTRIAN AMBASSADOR
SAILS FOR HOME.
l CX ' j
Lsi&AI
Persistent Advertising Is the Road
To Success.
TAKNOWSKV,
Count Adam Tarnowski, Austro
Hungarian ambassador to the United
States, who since his-arrival as the
successor of former Ambassador
Duniba, has not been recognized of
ficially by the government, photo
graphed as he was about to depart on
board the steamship Ryndam. Count
Tarnowski is returning under a safe
passage guarantee as a result of the
severance of diplomatic relations be
tween the United States and Austria.
(Persistent Advertising Is the Road
To Success.
.J-nA-i. "
hehompson Tielden Store
0 ;
(T) ...
HER TRAVELING SUIT
i
i 7"
3ft Dame Fashion says it
should be either blue or
gray in color plain tail
ored in style, with per
haps a . belted effect or
braided, ai. preferred.
The price depends upon
individual choice and
can be satisfactorily de
termined anywhere be
tween $25 and $65.
HER GOWNS
Can express much indi
viduality and may be of
Georgette or Chiffon Ta
ffeta or combinations of
both. If she chooses,
they may be of imported
Voile and nets with de
lightfuly dainty embroid
eries. A, service dress is
not -to be forgotten and
here again her selection is
not limited.
f
HER MILLINERY
Fashions that add so
much to the charm of the
occasion and the trip.
Graceful, becoming hats
of caterpillar braid with
hair edges, embroidered
with Tuscan, with trim
mings of flowers, velvet
and ribbons. For travel
dress or sport wear A
general utility hat in fact,
she chooses a beautiful
black braid model, a soft
becoming effect, much favored.
THROUGHOUT the store the bride
receives greatest consideration
this coming week. Preparations be
gun long ago have culminated in
lovely displays now nothing has been
overlooked that could serve to make se
lecting pleasant and profitable. And
whether the bride has set a limited ex
penditure or has placed no such re
straint, she will find the Thompson
Belden store ready to serve her best.
HER LINGERIE
May be hand made and
hand embroidered from
the Philippines gowns
and chemise. . Then, too,
are Crepe de Chine
gowns, envelope chemise,
corset covers, bloomers
and one-piece pajamas;
all of beautiful silk. And
embroidered sacques of Crepe
de Chine, incredibly lovely.
Then, too, are boudoir caps of
Laces, Nets, Chiffons, Crepe de
Chine and combinations of lnces
and ribbons and embroidery
with rosebud trimmings.
Shimmering White Silks
For The Bridal Gown
' None but the June Bride could have
spread for her approval such an as
sortment of Silks that embrace every
weave one could desire for every
purpose, particularly the bridal
gown itself.
Thompson-Belden Silks Fa
mous More Than SO Years
HER LINENS
So appreciated and treas
ured by every b r i de
Wonderful selections here
o f Italian Filet work,
French Cluny, hand em
broidered Madeira work.
Fine Damask sets Linen
Huck Towels. Hand i em
broidered Pillow Cases
hemstitched Linen Sheets and
-'Pillow Cases. Hand embroid
ered Sheer Bed Spreads and
finest Double Satin Damask
Cloths and Napkins in matched
sets of all sizes.
HER NEGLIGEES
To suit her fancy are
Crepe de Chine creations
with lace adornments and
startling Japanese fancies
and other pleasing ideas
of distinction. Petticoats
may be of Taffeta or Jer
sey, with silken flounces
and should blfend with the
color scheme of the suit.
So delightfully varied are
showings, that a personal view-'
ing is almost necesary to appre
ciate them.
HER BLOUSES
No problem, for many are
needed. For traveling, a
tailored blouse of linen or
dimity. Ma,ny with
stocks. For luncheons,
clever wash blouses that
are plain, but very dainty.
One should be of Georg
ette and that either two
toned or beaded. A ser
vice is offered that is of
real assistance in choosing.
HER ACCESSORIES
She will find distinctive
things that add to every
costume the final touch of
elegance. At best we can
mention, only a few and
request a personal visit as
the only satisfactory way
of knowing their interest
ing qualities Neck Fix
ings, Gloves, Hosiery;
F o o t w e ar, Hand Bags,
Veils, Parasols Details,
but, oh, so important to
the ensemble.
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