Omaha daily bee. (Omaha [Neb.]) 187?-1922, April 01, 1917, SOCIETY, Page 7, Image 23

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    7 I?
THE OMAHA SUNDAY BEE: APRTL 1. 1!17.
THE BEE'S BUILDERS PAGE
J
NEW BOSHES AREA
COIMTO FRONT
St. Mary's Avenue District,
One of Earliest Additions to
City, Attracts Attention.
TUKEY DETAILS HISTORY
St. Mary's avenue was one of the
main thoroughfares of early Omaha.
The avenue and that section of- the
city adjacent to it has a rather inter
esting history, which was retold by
Harry A. Tukey last Wednesday be
fore th: Omaha Real Estate board un
der tha head of "The Development of
the St. Mary's Avenue District" He
brought the district down through
history from 1862 to the present, with
all its developments. Speaking of the
improvements in this section he said
in part:
"There was very little done to this
property until the Flat Iron building
was built and the Sterling reniudeled.
The Kountze interests then removed
all of the frame buildings to the north
and cleared the ground up. In such
shape it remained until last summer,
when Mr. Kountze asked me to make
an appraisement of the property with
an idea of putting it on the market I
felt that it was such a large proposi
tion that I desired other independent
appraisements, and with that idea in
view he asked C E. George and A. L.
Reed for separate appraisements.
Appraisements Are Close.
"It was a peculiar coincident that
when the appraisements were turned
in, while there was some variation on
the individual lots, the high and low
appraisements were only $20,000 apart
on the total sum. and the third ap
praisement was exactly between the
other two. Mr. Kountze then turned
the property over to us for sale, add
ing only to these prices a small
amount on account of the change in
Howard street which I will later ex
plain. 'This property had been held so
long and offers on the same always
refused, that it is a surprise to many
people to realize the amount and
value of such a tract so close to town.
It has been passed by and overlooked
for so many years that few people
even realize that it is there.
Worth Million.
"It is probably the largest tract of
vacant ground as close to the business
center as has ever been put on the
market in any city in the United
States. The total value is about
$1,000,000, but with the growth of the
retail district of Omaha it seems the
ideal time to open up this piece of
property. As you can realize, Omaha
lias been a one-street town, and now
with Farnam street looming up as
practically the only western street
there is a danger of affecting the
central values, unless the other west
ern streets are developed.
"The retail business of Omaha is
practically centered between Dodge
and Howard streets, on Sixteenth,
and to make a solid, substantial town,
Dodge, Douglas, Farnam, Harney
and - Howard should be developed
more uniformly than at present, be
cause no town is bettered by any sud
den change of its high value district.
It is to all of our interests to aid in
a development that is for the best in
terest of the town itself. This is why
I am in favor of the Dodge street
proposed grade with the grading of
the cross streets, and frankly I am
not yet ready to favor the widening
of Twenty-fourth street.
Widening Howard Street.
"As soon as the handling of the
property was turned over to us, we
secured an option for a ninety-nine-vear
lease on the Krug corner on the
basis of $72,0000. We then took up
the widening of Howard street, which
you will notice at that time was only
fifty feet in width, and is paved only
thirty. We made arrangements with
the owners of the corner that we
would move their property north and
give them as much ground adjoining
their property as we took for the pro
posed street and would take a ninety-nine-year
lease on the new ground at
the same price. This was perfectly
satisfactory to them, so they Joined
with the Kountzes in making a deed
to the city of the strip of ground
lifty-six feet wide at Seventeenth
street and narrowing down to seven
teen feet at Eighteenth, and the
Kountzes deeded sufficient ground on
each side of Howard street to make
it seventeen feet wider all the way
through to Twentieth. This deed was
offered to the city without any con
ditions, and, of course, was gladly
accepted by them.
"This will make the street sixty
seven feet wide, and the paving seven
feet wider than St. Mary's avenue is
at the oresent time. It will make an
open space at Seventeenth and How
ird and west to the Flatiron building
)f almost 200 feet wide, wmcn may
icem a waste of space, but when it is
' fousidered this is the only 'five cor
ners' in the business district of
Omaha, it can readily be seen what
amount of traffic must be taken care
of, and will make an ideal spot for
large mass meetings, such as are now
held north ot the post omce.
"There has been so much talk about
establishing the automobile row on
Howard street, that I feel we should
explain what started it.
Extent of Efforts.
"fufnr this orooertv was turned
over to us for sale, the automobile
men had a meeting, and decided they
ivould attempt to secure buildings on
this tract of ground. They went to
Mr. Koutze, and he immediately re
ferred them to us, saying we were to
have the sale of the property when
it was put on the market I met their
committee several times, and told
them that if ten of them would agree
to move to this location, we would
build some buildings for them, or that
we would sell to any individual who
ould afford to build his own build
ing. This was the extent of our ef
forts to move the auto row, if it can
be called efforts. ,
"However, I was very much
pleased, and my belief in the prop
;rty was strengthened by the first
sale which t made, for I believe that
if I can sell to men like Hastings,
Wolf, Slater, Martin and Sweet; that
the only mistake made in pricing the
Plan for a Comfortable Bungalow
aef-o '
, . -tr-mr r "
-fLGDPL. pLAft-
The house illustrated this week is
one recently erected by the Willis
Realty company, at 1613 Willis ave
nue, for Mrs. N. W. Randoll. The
house fronts ncrth and with a porch
projecting so that a south exposure is
afforded. The vestibule and coat
closet is convenient The living room
and dining room are practically one
large apartment, separated only by
bookcases, which stand up from the
floor approximately four feet A
beam above these bookcases also in
dicates the dividing lint between the
living room and dining room. A
large and practical fireplace is ar
ranged in the living room. The cup
boards and work table are built in
the kitchen. The finish in the princi
pal rooms is in oak. The bedrooms
and bath are f.nished in white enamel.
The floors throughout are in oak.
It is the custom of the Willis Realty
company to absolutely complete the
houses, ready for occupancy. This
includes the plumbing, heating, light
fixtures, decorating, cement walks,
window shades,, and, in fact, every
possible luxury that can be installed
in a house of this size. This bunga
low contains a floored attic and is a
very complete and attractiv home.
This building can be erected at a cost
property is that we made it too low.
These gentlemen bought the Krug
lease of us, and we made them a
ninety-nine-year lease on enough of
the surrounding property to give
them a piece 143 feet on Howard by
125 feet on Seventeenth street on
which is now located the Manhattan
Oil company, and the Racquet club
building.
"Their plans, as you all know, are
to construct a building costing about
$75,000 on this corner. They had fig
ured to make the first story for small
auto accessory shops, and the balance
of the building for auto storage pur
pose, but with the new building for
Orchard-Wilhelm, the Hartman
Furniture company moving to How-
1 F "Ti "JSSSSS""'1"' i i T"wsmi' "ww"
T' &yc!i w., n 1531 iwiiij? r .
ftt ' f - ,111 U
a wow' ' ri-j
of approximately $2,800 complete.
The Willis Realty company is able t
olace this buildinar on a lot in Victor
Place and sell it with the grounds for
?
Q Investments in
Home Builders'
$1 Shares
Guarantees you 1
on your money and
gives yon mortgage
security without $1 i
of bonded indebted
ness. The price of old age
comfort and inde
pendence is in your
hands today.
Invest it in Home
Builders, Inc., where
it will be available)
when needed. You
can order shares by
mail in any number
desired.
Offices:
17th and Douglas St.
hi
Omaha, Neb.
Heavy Hoisting
E.J. DAVIS
1212 Farnam SL Tel. D. J5J
ard street and the plan of the Bur-gess-Nash
company, regarding the
Boyd theater, and the old Bennett
barn on Howard. I understand they
are now figuring on a different sort
of a building."
Millions of Acres of Land
Are Taken by Homesteaders
Advices to the Burlington indicate
that during January, February and
approximately $3,600. For further
information apply to I. H. Willis,
1122 City National Bank Building.
Phone Douglas 3919.
March of this year 1,300,000 acres of
Wyoming land were homesteaded at
the Douglas land office. Generally
this land was filed upon in tracts of
640 acres each.
No report has been received from
the land offices at Sundance and Buf
falo, but it is believed that the entries
at these offices were each nearly
equal to those at Douglas.
Bee Want Ads Produce Results.
LET US TELL YOU WHY
Our Trees and Shrubs Grow
FIRST
Beiui thty u frh dug and not ttxmtoA br txpoemr
SECOND
We deliver to your Oratha raifdraee on ihort notice.
A fine line of noraorr atock Japanese Barberry, 12 to IS lncha, $15 pr 110.
Indacap thrub planting our specialty.
BENSON-OMAHA NURSERY
F. J. FLYNN, Prop. Phon Bmu BM.
Main Office awl Salt GroraoV-Slst and Rifffi. Bnn.
South Omaha Salaa Ground 24th and 0 Sta.
For Artistic, Well Planned, Honestly
Built Houses
SEE
WILLIS REALTY CO.
1122 City National Bank BMg.
Phone Douglaa 3919.
tiniiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiraiiiiiiiitraimmiim
t ALL OF THESE BUNGALOWS ARE
I FURNISHED WITH
WELL
BILTiV
MILL. V
WORK
Made in Omaha By
ADAMS & KELLY CO.
Millwork Manufacturers
12th to 13th on Nicholas.
Dougla 1589.
Building Operations
For Quarter Show Gain
Building operations for the first
three months of this year hold a sub
stantial lead over the corresponding
period of last year. March broke
about even with March of 1916.
The total since January 1 is $1,460,
245, as against $1,339,772 for first
quarter of last year.
Comparative figures for three
months of 1917 and 1916 follow
1(17. 1111.
.Titnuarr 177.111
Kobruarr tll.lit (II. til
March at .SIS Itl.lOi
Total Il.ttl.14t ll.MMII
Street Car Hits Wagon;
Injured Driver Sues
Fred Johanson has field suit for
$15,500 damages against the Omaha
& Council Bluffs Street Railway
company in district court as a result
of an accident which occurred at Ben
son on February 5. A horse and
wagon driven by Johanson were
struck by a street car. Johanson al
leges he suffered injuries which will
permanently disable him.
No. N.P. 284. '
Three light, 16-inch semi-indirect
bowl installed for
$g50
We arc closing out many designs
of semi-indirect bowls and other
lighting fixtures to make room for
new stock. These are too good to
last long. Beat choice to the first
comers.
Burgess-Granden
Company
1S11 Howard Stmt,
Saum's
PreserTative
TBI frsat advswtaas) of an claa
tie and eohaaiva natarial
lilca Sanaa's wham applied to
eoneraU floor la that ttw ftaa
chtckfnt and erasinji f tha nr
faea from axpanston and contrac
tion DOES NOT REMOVE THE
WATERPROOF QUALITIES. Th
Bum deposited atratehaa across
tha nitrate ehaeka and CLOSES
THEM. Other hardanera product
a rigid and brlttla hardnaaa.
Fwrnishci mi tppHti by
JOSEPH P. REDDING
31 4-31 B Fannm BuUding.
Old First National Baak Bid
p Nab.
DON'T STOP BUILDING
We can save you money on your
building material
A Million Brick, at
$2.50 Per Load
Cat Iron Columns and Lintels, at
2 Cent Per Pound
Staal Beams, at
3 Cents Per Pound
DRY WHITE PINE
Second Hand Lumber
$20 to $24 Per Thousand
Doors and Windows.
WALL PAPER
lc to 3c Per Roll
H. GROSS
Lumber & Wrecking Co.,
Webster 2S84.
Miiiiwiiiitfliniiinwi'iiiit'itniw
A food contractor la aaiantlal to tha
making of aubatantlal aoma. All ml.
donca work and repairing to my apaclattf.
Eatlmataa chaarlulljr fnralahad.
N. L THOMSEN
5204 Laavanwortk St. phona Wal. 13ST
Phone Doug. 349. Glaaing
Buy your glass and paint at
Henry M. Johannszen
. Glass and Paint Company
114 S. 14th St. Omaha, Nab.
Wire and Iron Fences and Gates for Lawn, Garden and Poultry
Yards. Trellises for Vines and Roses. Grape Arbors. Flower Borders
Clothes Posts
Iron and Wire
Window Guardi
Screen Door Guards
Send for Catalogue
Wire Arches
Summer Houses
Chairs and Settees
Tree and Flower Guards
Lawn Vases
CHAMPION IRON & WIRE WORKS, 15th and Jackson.
Tel. Doug. 1590
No Commission
No Renewals
We charge no commission when you make
a loan with us. We charge $10.00 for loans
up to $5,000.00, which covers the examina
tion of property and abstract of title and
recording mortgage.
No renewal of your loan is necessary. The
small monthly payment required each
month on the principal reduces your loan
gradually until all is paid off.
Why increase your loan rate by paying a
commission or bother with renewals of your
loan when our method gives you money at
6 and saves you from renewing your loan?.
The Conservative Savings
and Loan Association
1614 HARNEY STREET
Resources, $13,000,000.00.
Reserve, $350,000.00.
TRANS MISSISSIPPI
LAWN MIXTURE
Osuki's UMMilnl liwa ilirtsr for 11 ynri
THE NEBRASKA SEED CO.
UUHeoarelSb Phetts Oeuglet I7N
75 years ago
everyone wore homespun-
and, likewise, everyono used hand-mixed
paint. Tnlay, when machine-spun cloth
is to much better and cheaper, no one
would think of wearing homespun. Many
people are still using hand-mixed paint,
however, because they do not know that
LEAD and ZINC PAINT
Jh
will save them money and
labor. Devoe Lead and Zmc
Paint is simply made of the
same ingredients the old-time
painter used: Pure White
Lead, Pure White Zinc, and
Pure Linseed Oil. The only
difference is that Devoe is
mixed by machinery, 500
gallons at a time. Therefore,
it is always absolutely uniform in strength,
color and covering capacity.
We guarantee Devoe Lead and Zinc Paint to be pure.
It contains no whiting, silica or other worthless materials.
Ask your dealer for s Color Card, or write to us for one.
DEVOE & RAYNOLDS CO.
Chicago Kansas City Denver MiaoeapoeU
founded In New York in 17S4. The oldeet manufacturta sonceaa i eft-VsMed States,
Quality First
Guarantee Iceless Soda Fountains
8 and 10-foot Patterns on Display
Full lmes of J. Hungerford Smith's and
Beach and Claridge Fountain Supplies
Call or Write for Catalog.
E. E. Bruce & Co
For Best Service, Best Results Uce The Bee Yfc !v