Omaha daily bee. (Omaha [Neb.]) 187?-1922, December 31, 1916, NEWS SECTION, Page 9, Image 9

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    THK OMAHA SUNDAY RFK: OKCKMRKR SI. 1916.
9 A
BURGESS-NASH TO
DODBLEITS STORE
Historic Boyd Theater to Be
Torn Down to Make Place
for Modern Structure.
ADDITION SIX STORIES HIGH
Tlie Burgess-Nash company an
nounced yesterday that it will
build a six-story addition right west
of its present big store, on the
ground- where the Boyd theater now
stands, with eighty-eight feet front
on Harney and 152 feet on Seven
teenth street. - .
Work of tearing down the theater
will start within sixty days and the
new structure will be rushed to com
pletion. It is expected to have it
ready by December 1, 1917.
.The plans for the addition are be
ing made by George B. Prinz, archi
tect. They speciiy that the new
structure shall be built of concrete
and brick, to conform as nearly as
possible to the present building, with
which it will be directly connected.
The entire building, new and old,
will be equipped with the very latest
and most practical appliances for the
service, comfort and convenience of
the shopping public.
The new structure will almost
double the size of the store. It will
give it a total floor space of nearly
250,000 square feet, or about five and
a half acres. This would make a
store twenty feet wide and two and a
half miles long; that is, a store reach
ing from Tenth street to Forty-third
street.
Show Wonderful Growth.
The Burgess-Nash stores have had
a tremendous growth in the three
vears of their history. Sales have
made the phenomenal increase of 150
ocr cent. I he store has been con
tinually getting more and more
cramped for room for increasing
stocks of goods and greater crowds
ot customers.
"We feel that the Omaha public de
mands a store like Burgess-Nash,"
said Louis C. Nash, vice president of
the company. Ihe wonderful growth
of our business during the three
short vears of our existence, the con
stant and increasing expressions of
public confidence as evidenced by our
sales records, which show an increase
of better than 150 per cent, have
demonstrated to us that there is room
for a store like ours, and it also
further demonstrated that our busi
ness principles of merchandising of
meeting the public more than half
way are right.
"We have just completed our most
successful year and in rounding it out
we realize that if we are to be able to
live up to our motto, "The greatest
service to the greatest, nnmber,.' we
must increase our store facilities, and
this can only be done bv erecting an
addition to our present store, where
the boyd theater building now
stands.
Theater a Landmark.
The Boyd theater, which will be
torn down to make room for the new
structure, is an Omaha landmark.
"There is much sentiment con
nected with the Boyd," said Mr. Nash
"We may arrange some sort of ;
'farewell performance' in the old the-.
ater before it is dismantled.
Governor James E. Boyd purchased
the site in WW from General W. W.
Lowe and erected the theater. It is
five stories high, built of stone, iron
and pressed brick and has a seating
capacity of iflW.
It was opened September 3, 1891
by Thomas Boyd, the lessee. Au
gustus Thomas' American play, "Ala
bama, was presented on this occa
sion by A. M. Palmer's company. A
large and fashionable audience was
present Governor Boyd was called
before the curtain and made a short
address on the progress of Omaha
and the work of erecting the theater.
Hon. John M. Thurston also spoke.
The estimated cost at the outset
was $150,000, but nearly $100,000 ad
ditional was spent on the building
to carry out Governor Boyd's desire
to make it the equal of any theater in
the country.
In the years that have elapsed since
that time the Boyd has been the
scene of countless theatrical produc
tions, and there the "wealth and
beauty" of Omaha have enjoyed the
beauties and wonders of the stage.
Most ot the great actors and ac
tresses of the land during these years
have trodden the boards at the Boyd.
Banquet for Archbishop
Harty at the Fontenelle
Prominent Omahans will give a
banquet - the Fontenelle on the
evening of Monday, January 15, to
honor Archbishop J. J. Harty.
The committee in charge of the ar
rangement are John A. McShane
G. W. Wattles, C. H. Pickens, J. H.
Millard, b. J. Burkley, W. M. letters
W. A. Redick, T. C. Byrne, C. J
Smythc, E. Buckingham, George
Brandeis, T. P. Redmond. J. A. C.
Kennedy, Ward Bnrgess, M. J. Mur
phy and f . W. Judson. It will be en
tirely a men's- affair, no women being
invited.
Mr. Wattles and Archbishop Glen
non of St Louis are to be the speak-
New Year's Cards Are
Making the Mails Heavy
Omaha firms are deluging the mails
with New Year cards and letters.
The rush is the largest in the history
of the Omaha postoffice, local first-
class mail eclipsing that received dur
ing the Christmas rush.
Carriers and postoffice employes
will have a half-day holiday New
ear. Unly one delivery will be
made in the residence sections and
two in the business districts. The
Keneral delivery, stamp and informa
lion windows at the postoffice will
be closed after 10:30 Monday morn
ing.
RECEPTION
TO PUBLIC
Y. M. C. A.
MONDAY
7:30 to 9:30 P. M.
Omaha Hay Market
Has Great Year On
Its Initial Run
That the Omaha Hay market was
established at just the right time is
indicated by the enormous movement
of alfalfa hay from Nebraska points
into this city this tall and winter.
So great is the hay movement that
the Union Pacific is slatting up slock
cars ;to carry the product in. The
cars are slatted up to prevent tire.
"There is more hay in the western
part of Nebraska than ever before."
declared William Drummy, traveling
freight agent for the Union Pacific.
"One little town west of Kearney or
dered 1,000 cars to move the crop
raised on the land around it."
And Omaha is getting more than its
share of this great hay movement. For
the Union Pacific will only ship to
river points, Omaha. St. Joseph and
Kansas City, in its own cars If ship
pers wish to send their Kav to Kast
St. Louis or other hay markets, they
must get foreign cars. With the car
shortage so acute, ihe Union Pacific
doesn't care to send its own cars onto
other lines. For that reason shippers
lean toward the river points, and Ihe
Omaha Hay market is prospering as a
result.
"Saps" Are Safer
In Newest Style,
But Not Too Safe
The cold weather has brought on
the annual epidemic of informations
filed in the county attorney's office
against persons charged with carry
ing concealed weapons. Blackjacks,
known as "sap." are running revol
vers a close second this year for popu
larity among the plebians who carry
arsenals.
Styles in blackjacks have changed
considerably this year, according to
'Minneapolis Mike" Doyle, who says
he has always kept a little ahead of
the procession and managed to save
a few honest dollars with the aid of
the little, innocent sleep-producers.
"Minneanolis Mike" avers they're
wearing blackjacks lighter and longer
this season.
"Yu see, fren', de old style saps was
hefty and had all the stuff crowded up
into one end of dem. They wus dane
zerus, as youse was likely any job to
cave some old bloke's dome in. Wid
deeze new-fangled ones youse can fan
a guy's conk so's the saw-bones won't
have to do any wire-weavin' through
his ivory afterwards."
WEATHER FORECAST
FOR ENTIRE YEAR
Predictions Made for Each
Month by Well Known Dr.
Igno Ramus of Omaha.
New Bridge Over
Platte River Near
Yutan is Planned
A new bridge over the Platte river
south of Yutan will be erected at a
cost of $98,000, according to a decision
reached Saturday afternoon at a joint
conference in the county court house
between the county commissioners of
Douglas and Saunders counties and
State Engineer Johnson. Work will
begin in the spring. The state will
bear one-half the cost, of the structure
and the two counties will pay one
fourth each. 'She exact location of
the bridge has not been decided.
Close the Record Year for
Shearing Lambs on 'Change
New York, Dec. 30. Dealings in
bonds on the New York Stock ex
change during the year which closed
yesterday totaled a par value of
$l,158uy.WJU, a new record. jne
total in 1915 was $951,798,000.
Total dealings in stocks for 1916
were 234,678,000 shares, compared
with 173,389,000 in 1915. The year's
dealings in stocks have been exceeded
only on three previous occasions, in
1901, 1905 and 1906. The record was
set in 1906 with 284,063,459 shares.
Increase in Paper Cost Forces
Up Prices on Magazines
New York, Dec. 30. Owing to the
increased cost of white paper and
other materials necessary to printing
and art work, several magazines of
national circulation announced today
increases in the price of subscription.
Publishers explain that many of
them have had to renew their con
tracts for paper at this time and to
pay nearly 50 per cent more than this
item has cost them heretotore.
German FTye Killed.
Berlin. Dec. 30. (Br Wireless to Say-
vine.) Lieutenant uuslav l-rrers. tne noted
German aviator, who recently waa decorated
with the Order Pour I.e Merlte. haa been
killed In an air engagement on the weatern
front the Overseas News agency announced
today.
APPLIES TO ENTIRE STATE
By A. R. GROH.
Here is another great boon which
1 present to the people of Omaha and
the surrounding country a complete
weather forecast for 1917.
The patent medicine companies
ha published almanacs with
weather predictions. But this predic
tion is different. It is made by a
secret process, discovered by the cel
ebrated Dr. Igno Ramus, and is the
only absolutely reliable long distance
weather forecast known to civilized
man.
Here are the facts as worked oat
by our trained scientists:
January will be a very cold month.
At times there will e high winds
from the north. Snow may be ex
pected. February will be a cold month also.
The days will average somewhat
longer than those in January. Be
tween the 3d and the 27th the ther
mometer will register lower, than
freezing temperatures frequently.
The 1st to the 20th of Maf'ch is a
eold and blustery period, with occa
sional days of comparative mildness,
but no hot days: Various kinds of
weather will mark the period from
the 21st (when spring begins) to the
31st.
Look for Rain.
April will be marked by unsettled
and variable weather. Rain may 'be
looked for between the 2d and the
2Sth.--
Many days of springlike mildness,
with bright sunshine, will be seen in
May. Showers and thunderstorms
will occur several times between the
4th and the 30th. Frost will not
come later than the 25th.
June will be a warm month and in
the latter part some days will be un
comfortably hot. Several rainy days
will occur between the 2d and the
29th.
July and August will be the hottest
months of 1917. No blankets will be
required at night nor any tires by
day. The weather will be so warm
that swimming in Carter lake and
various outdoor pools will become a
popular pastime. Temperatures may
rise as high as 100 on several days.
The heat will moderate in Septem
ber, particularly in the latter p4rt of
the month, when there will be some
really chilly days.
Fall Weather.
October will be a month of beauti
ful fall weather, with cool, comforta
ble nights. Some days will be quite
warm and others rather cool.
In November there will be temper
atures, some days as low, or lower,
than freezing, but, on the whole, it
will be a month of typically beautiful
Nebraska fall weather. Possibly
snow will fall toward the latter part
of the month.
, December will be cold and bracing.
Snow may be looked for some time
between the 1st and the 2th. the
thermometer will register tempera
tures below the freezing point nearly
every day of the month.
There you are, people. It might
be well to clip this out and paste or
pin it in some conspicuous place
where you can check up the forecast
with the actual weather, thus proving
for yourself that the weather can be
accurately forecasted a year in ad
vance by Dr. Ramus' method, Colonel
Lucius A. Welsh's statements to the
contrary notwithstanding.
Omaha Daily Tribune
Absorbs the Volksblatt
The Omaha Daily Tribune,
Omaha's German daily paper, bought
the subscription list of the Nebraska
Volksblatt, a German weekly paper
issued for many years at West
Point, Neb. The former owner of
the Volksblatt, E. M. von Seggern,
bought the Republican at West Point
and will from now on continue that
newspaper. Val J. Peter, publisher
of the Daily Tribune, has consoli
dated the Volksblatt with the Tribune
and will maintain a branch office at
West "Point
CABARET BALL
and
CONFETTI BATTLE
AUDITORIUM
TONIGHT
George Green's Full Brass Band
ADMISSION SOc COUPLE
THOUSANDS HAVE KIDNEY
TROUBLE AND DON'T KNOW IT
Weak and unhealthy kidneys cause
so much sickness .and suffering and
when through neglect or other causes,
kidney trouble is permitted to con
tinue, serious results may be expected.
Your other organs may need at
tention but your kidneys should
have attention first because their
work is most important.
If you feel that your kidneys are
the cause of your sickness or run
down condition commence taking Dr.
Kilmer's Swamp-Root, the great kid
ney, liver and bladder remedy, be
cause if it proves to be the remedy
you need and your kidneys begin to
improve they will help all the other
organs to health.
P.evalency of Kidney Disease.
Most people do not realize the
alarming increase and remarkable
prevalency of kidney disease. While
kidney disorders are among the most
common diseases that prevail they are
almost the last recognized by pa
tients, who usually content them
selves with doctoring the effects,
while the original disease constantly
undermines the system.
A Trial Will Convince Anyone.
Thousands of people have testified
that the mild and immediate effect of
Swamp-Root, the great kidney, liver
and bladder remedy, is soon realized
and that it stands the highest for its
remarkable results in the most dis
tressing cases.
Symptoms of Kidney Trouble.
Swamp-Root is not recommended
for everything, but if you suffer from
annoying bladder troubles, frequently
passing water night and day, smarting
or irritation in passing, brick-dust or
sediment, headache, backache, lame
back, dizziness, poor digestion, sleep
lessness, nervousness, heart disturb
ance due to bad kidney trouble, skin
eruptions from bad blood, neuralgia,
rheumatism, lumbago, bloating, ir
ritability, worn-out feeling, lack of
ambition, maybe loss ot tiesh or sallow
complexion, kidney trouble in its
worst form may be stealing upon you.
Swamp-Root is Pleasant to Take.
If you are already convinced that
Swamp-Root is what you nerd, you
can purchase the regular fifty-cent
and one-dollar size bottles at all drug
stores.
SPECIAL NOTE You may obtain a sample size bottle of SwnmD-Root
by enclosing ten cents to Dr. Kilmer & Co., Binghamton, N. Y. This gives
you the opportunity to prove the remarkable merit of this medicine. They
will also send you a book of valuable information, containing many of the
thousands of grateful letters received from men and women who say they
found Swamp-Root to be just the remedy needed m kidney, liver and blad
der troubles. The value and success of Swamp-Root are so well known that
our readers are advised to send for a sample size bottle. Address Dr. Kilmer
& Co., Binghamton, N. Y. Be sure to say you read this offer in The Omaha
Sunday Bee.
VETERAN INSURANCE MAN
CALLED BY DEATH.
BASCOM ROBOT
CALLEDBY DEATH;
Cold Proves Fatal to Business j
Leader Who Founded Bank
ers Reserve Life Compi uy.
ONCE A SCHOOL TEACHER
BASCOM 11. ROB ISO N.
Mother of Sixteen Makes
Appeal to Mrs. G. W. Doar.e
Mrs. G. W. Doane, superintendent
of the Associated Charities, was in
terested but not excited when her
department was called upon to assist
a mother of sixteen children, the
youngest a babe of three months.
The mother is 45 years of age and
the father is 57. Six children have
been added to the family during the
last six years, according to Mrs.
Doane's records.
All but three of this flock live at
home.
"There is a bread anil butter prob
lem for you," remarked Ihe charities
superintendent.
Basconi H. Robison, founder and
president of the Bankers Reserve Life
company, died at 6 a. m. at his resi
dence, 252ti Dodge street. He had
been ill eight days, hit indiposition
starting with a cold and indigestion.
On Friday he had a rally and mem
bers of his family at that time were
Micoui-aged in the hope that he would
overcome the illness.
He is survived by Lis wife and four
children, who are: Mrs. Walter G.
Preston, Mrs. Hay C. Wagner and
Robert L. Robison of Omaha and
Mrs. James R. Farney of Kansas City.
School Superintendent
Mr. Robison was 63 years old. He
came to Omaha thirty years ago from
Tekamah, where he had been super
intendent of school. For many years
he was general western agent for the
New York Mutua1 Reserve Life and
later started the Bankers Reserve
Life company, which grew to be an
extensive business institution; under
his administration. At one time he
was quite active in republican politics,
though never aspiring to office.
lie was a member of the First Pres
byterian church and of the Commer
cial club.
The funeral will he held Tuesday
afternou at 2 o'clock from his late
home. Dr. U. H. Jenks will officiate.
Burial will be in Forest Lawn cemetery.
THE BEST OF VAUDEVILLE
FOR
A HAPPY
YEAR SPECIAL
2 Shows Tonight
First Show, 7:30. Second Show, 9:40
To allow the first audience to exit, patrons of the
second show are requested to time their arrival
at the theater at 9:35, not earlier.
Matinee Today Regular Hour, 2:30
An Excellent Show Thousand of Happy Greetert.
Join the Throng Welcoming The Happy New Year.
.1
md Julius (Man
NO Kl ill H
LJ J
1508-1510 Douftlas St,
Starting Tuesday, 8:30 A. M.
THE I! TENT Or ALL IBPORTAKCK TO YOU
OUR ANNUAL
JAHIARY
m
CHARGES.
IxAT-AWATS,
DBUVERTKS,
EXCHANGES
of oar entire stock of
Coats. Suits, Dresses,
Skirts, Blouses, Furs
ULJ
EVERY SALE
IS FINAL. '
NO
EXCHANGES
So derisive have prices been ent, so decisive has become
onr determination to empty racks, tables and cabinets of every
Winter garment in this immense stock, that this sale stands
pre-eminent as the greatest apparel event for many a day.
W(e 're prepared to care for capacity business. We predict
this sale to bring out the greatest crowds of the new year.
Such price-cutting warrants this prediction. Come, get your
share of these exceptional values.
CLEARANCE OF WOMEN'S SUITS FAR BELOW WHOLESALE COST
Group
One
Group
Two
S $171?
Group
Three
Up to J29.J0 Suits of Poplin, Gabardine, Broad
cloth and Velour. Navy, Black and colors.
lip lo $39.50 Suits of
Poplin, Fur Trimmed,
and Brown.
Velonr, Broadcloth.
Navy, Green. Black
Up to $49.60 Suit. Chiffon, Broadcloth,
Velours. Fur trimmed, wonderful styles. All
popular colore.
WONDERFUL VALUES IN WOMEN'S COATS DURING THE CLEARANCE
Group
One
Group
Two
I HT1
Group
Three
Op to $26.00 Coats, street models. Ripple
Cloth, Cheviots and Velours. Season's desir
able colors.
Up to $35.00 Coats, splendid styles.
Wool Plush, Velour, Meltons.
Hp to $46.00 Coats,- handsome street and
semi-dress models ot Velour, Broadcloth and
other choice coatings.
Extraordinary Ollcrings in DRESSES, Silk, Georgette, Satin, Serge
Group
One at
$H75
Group
Two
Group
Three
Up to $22.50 Dressed. Smart models of Satin,
Taffeta and Men's Wear Serge. Navy, Black
and Colors.
CLEARANCE OF
BLOUSES
Most Dominant Sale Held
in Recent Months
This greatest ot all our Blouse Sales
will create a sensation amongst
Omaha women. Thousands of smart,
new Blouses at a small part of their
actual worth.
$1.2! & $1.50 BLOUSES Hftf
Dainty Vol) and Bat tut, llC
Whit and Novlt1ea, many m
uniart, new sty lea; fl
choice m V
$2.50 & $3.80 BLOUSES A 7Q
Crepe do Chins and Voiles, VJ f ff
in several colors, all siies,
wide range of becomtng B
style
$3.50 & $4.50 BLOUSES A7Q
A wonderful lot of Blouse.. B I V
Georgette!, Crepe de f.
Chinee, Taffetas, every
popular color; choice
-$5.00 & $5.95 BLOUSES ft7Q
Nrw Hprlnff mnriHs in Ofp V J I V
rttfts, unlimited selection,- BW
..nr.i1t-Yill tltvlpM . ..
$7.50 and $10 BLOUSES 7Q
Nearly 1,000 Blount of J ff
(rAorgetta, Net, Uropn d
Chine and Taffeta, all col
ors, choice, at
Up to $29.50 Dresses. Clever models of Men's
Wear Serge, Crepe de Chines, Satins; all de
sirable colon).
Hp to $35.00 Dresses. Beautiful models for
street, afternoon and party wear. Every color.
Most of them new spring garments.
Extra Special-Hour Sales
Starts 10 A. M. Sharp-Ends 12 M. Tnesday
For two hours Tuesday we feature the most
sensational values ever attempted In Omaha. None
sold before 10 A. M. Every sale is final-lols are
limited.
DRESSES WORTH TO $19.50 $
Navy, Black and colors, in Serges, Silks
and Satins, all sizes; fifty Dresses In the H
lot, at ..M VF
COATS WORTH TO $17.50 AT tmm
45 Coats in Pebbled Cherlets and Novelty " J
Coatings some fur trimmed; all slies, all A
colors, at fl
SUITS WORTH TO $27.50 AT
35 Poplin Suits, in Brown, Navy and
Green; sizes to 42; Silk Uned Jackets,
at
CLEARANCE OF
SKIRTS
THREE HIGH POWERED
VALUE GROUPS
$6.50--$7.5t) Skirts $S5
Noveltj Taffetas. I'opllns, Jf
in black, navy and colors,
all alaea, during January SSI
Clearance, choice
$8,75 4 $10 Skirls $g5
New eprlng models In IK
Serge, Poplin and Gabar- ' D
dine; Navy. Black and col- 09
ora, all sizee; your choice. . Vi
$12.50515 Skirls $ffJ85
Satin.. Taffeta., gergee.
Velours. Poplins, In all col- M
ora, .lie. and styles; II
choice, any one, at II
FURS
UNRESTRICTED CHOICE
OF ANY
SCARF, MUFF OR SET
IN THc HOUSE AT
HALF PRICE