Omaha daily bee. (Omaha [Neb.]) 187?-1922, November 05, 1916, NEWS SECTION, Page 16, Image 16

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    THE OMAHA SUNDAY BEE: NOVEMBER 5, 1916.
16 A
ing the."championshfp of the Rocky
Mountain Intercollegiate conference
went glimmering today when they
were defeated by the Colorado Agri
cultural college champions by a score
of 21 to 13. .. -
The Aggies fought a defensive
game almost the entire first half. The
contest was a mixture of line plunging
and open play. The University of
Denver scored a touchdown in the
first minute of play.
Marking Diagonal
. Trail Xhrotigh Iowa
Iowa Fails, la., Nov., 4. (Special.)
Tl'he Diagonal trail, one of the latest
automobile routes, across the state, is
setting the pace for many of its older
rvials in point o marking. The last
week this route has been marked in
this county and Wright and no better
outlined route can be found in the
state than the Diagonal. The route
enters the county at Eldora and tuns
from here to Dows. It is the longest
i r Tn It,...-
Dr. J.D.Moffat r
Noted Minister and
Educator, is D$tf
I Washington, Pa., Nov. 4. The Rev.
Dr. Janwi David Moffat, president
emeritus of Washington and Jeffer
son college, died here today after an
illness of less than a week, from
paralysis; Dr. Moffat, who as mod
erator of the general assembly of the
Presbyterian church in 1905, was born
at New Lisbon, O., March 15, 1846.
and was educated at Washington and
Jefferson college and Princeton
theological seminary. He was admit
ted te the Presbyterian ministry in
1873. In 1882 he was elected presi
dent of Washington and Jefferson
college, in which position he con
tinued for Ihirty-three years. Mr.
Moffat was a firm believer in church
unit and was Instrumental in bring
ing about the ..;ion of the Presby
terian and .Cumberland Presbyterian
churches. ,
Los Angeles Will Allow
Running of Big Auto Races
Los Angeles. Nov. 4. Permission
to hold the Vanderbilt and Grand
Prix races at Santa Monica November
16 and -18. on a course running
Los Angeles, was regranterf today by
the Board of Public Works, When
waivers were filed releasing the city
from liability from accidents. The
original permit was revoked October
19, when it was found members of the
board might be personally responsible.
Denver Is Defeated by
The Colorado Farmers
, Denver, Colo., Nov. 4. The Uni
versity of "Denver's chalices of attain
route in the country, Being j,uu mim
long, running from Miami, Fla to
Portland, Ore. Every fifth pole in the
country is marked with a black and
white sign. Five poles are marked at
each turn with Ihe letters R-and L
indicating the direction Of the turn.
In the cities and towns every pole is
marked. , ' ,
through territory recently annexed to
MM
nmniHHnMiiinmmmmnMffliimwm'iiinffl'niitf
VOU know that business was good in 1912 and the
' early part of 1913. Woodrow Wjlson and a Dem
ocratic Congress came into power on March 4th, 1913.
The Wilson Underwood tariff bill was passed in
October, 1913. Business immediately began to show
signs of stagnation and recession.
In New York, Governor Glynn, when
thousands were working for 10 cents an
hour, sent a special message to the New
York Legislature, in whichJie said:
"Public attention has been forcibly turned to
the fact that a large number of men are unable
to find employment. During the past Fall and
Winter the problem of the unemployed has
steadily grown more acute. For the man who
is not sincerely anxious to secure work the pub
t lie has no sympathy. For the man who is anx
ious to work, but cannot find employment, the
State has sympathy and a very real concern."
ead these Headlines from
New York City Newspapers :
AT INDIANAPOLIS the Central Labor Union issued a circular, part
of which ii reproduced in the following facsimile: ,
STAY AWAY
Discourage All Who Are Thinking of
Coming To This City
Thousands of Men Are Walking the
Streets Every Day Looking for Work
AGAIN WE ADVISE YOU STAY AWAY FROM INDIANAPOLIS.
' Signed: ' , ' . . '" ' -;
ARTHUR MILES, N C.C.BARBER,
, r;-; DAVID ERBLEDING, , L. A. BARTH, Sec'y, Committee.
" ' Approved by Indianapolis C. L. U. January 25,vl915. and or
dered distributed. Labor papers please copy.
In Ohio Governor Willis sent a special
message to the Legislature, in which he
said: . ... i .
"I have no desire to dwell on the unhappy in
dustrial conditions existing in Ohio and other
States. Nevertheless, the fact remains that
thousands of able-bodied, young, honest men
and women are out of employment." ,
When this message appeared in the
Ohio papers it was accompanied with the
comment that thex industrial conditions
then prevailing were worse than at' any
time since the Cleveland panic of 1893.
, Read these Headlines from .
New York City Newspapers : '
(New York Timet, March 28, 1914)
25,000 MEN DROPPED -BY
THE N. Y. CENTRAL
Falling Off in" Earnings Has
Forced Retrenchments
t Since Dec. 1, Hardin '
v Says. ? -
me
(New York Sun,"t)ec. 6," 1914)
OUT OF WORK ARMY
LARGEST, IH YEARS
National Employment Association
Report! Practically No Jobi to
.-" ' Bo Found.
' MORE MEN LAID OFF DAILY. ;
Rallroaaa and Induitrlait Said to Bo
Planning Big Reduction!
...Xfapyjh-.v
. J. ...
(New York Sun, Jan. 30, 1914)
Mayor tackles jbig
"jobless" problem
Mitchal Hoara Suifaitiom at Confar
ono on Uaemplojrmant.
MAY PICK ADVISERS
GuetU of Municipal Lodging Houto
Show Two-Fold Increase in Yaar. ,
-
(New York Times, Feb. 5, 1915)
500,000 BUNDLES v
-FOR THE JOBLESS
' ....
Headquarters of Mayor's Com
mittee Swamoed br Resoonse
' to Appeal for Clothes.
The great European war began. The "fac
tories in Europe ceased making goods to be
sold in America and began sending us orders
for al sorts of ;war munitions. Our factories'
were"speeded up, the unenfployed were put to" .
' ' i : :. " ;;v . .. .. . ,..;
'.Cattle, Horses and mules
- . Brass, Manufactures of. , ... .,
1 ' Breadstuf;i:w ;:;V'''-''
. ' ' Aeroplarfes and par.;'.i 7.. .......
' , . , Automobiles and parts . . . V . . : . . . ; ',
' ' Cars push carts, motor cycles, etc
Chemicals, 'dyes,' acids, soda salts, etc.,
, Copper to France, Italy and England. .
Explosives ............ ....T.
(Iron and steel. .
Firearms ....J..'. ..........
- Metal working machinery; . . .y.
Nails and spikes. . v .... ..v. ........ .-
, Barbed wire and other wire .... ..
Leather and skins. ............... ; .
Boots and shoes I V.'
Manufactured leather and skins. .....
. Condensed milk
Refined sugar
Wool, apparel and manufactures of . . ,
i. ' Zinc ...;.........
work, "and within a few months all the indus
tries of this country were humming.
The following table shows the enormous ex
pansion of our business, due" wholly to the
European Wa: , , , .v .
(New York Times, Feb. 10, 1914)
PHILADELPHIA'S
MANY IDLE
75,000 Out of Work, but Busi
. ness Prospects are Improving.
Just before
the war .
- r - Two yeara-
:f late 4!.K!mir
Yar ending Year endine . t
$ ...4,700,000 $.:.98,800,000.
4.000.00Q
-165,000,000
., . 226,000 .
33,000,000
51,000,000
27,500,000 ;
55,000,000; ;
- - "6,000,000
251,000,000 '
1 3,500,000 :
14,000,000 v
2,500,000 ,
" 7,800,000
. -36,500,000
18,000,000
57,000,000
1,300,000
- 1,800,000
'; ' 6,900,000
. 406,000
128.000.000 V: .;
" .435,000,000 ' .
v-: 7,000,000 ;'5''-
120,000,000 -
i67fooo,ooo;
.124,000,000 .
129,000,00. .,
. 467,000,000 V .
". 621,000,000
18,000,000,5 61,000,000.
10,000,000
40,000,000 .
. 80,000,000
: 47,000,000 '
146,000,000
12,000,000 ..
79,000,000
73,000,000
. 45,000,000 , 1
(New York Sun, Jan. 29, 1914)
WOMEN OUT OF WORK , --
' : PLEAO FOR CHANCE
Tall- at Cooper, Union of Condition
, That Bar Them' From Bread-
-;v:: ... . winning. ''.: . . ....
THEN MARCH IN STREET.
(New York Times, Feb. 3, 1914) , A
325,000 MEN NOW
OUT OF WORK HERE
And Most of Them Have
Homes and Families to
Support, Says Charity
Association.
140.000 LABORERS ARE IDLE
$747,132,000 $2,907,800,000
(New York Sun, Dec. 30, 1914)
CITY CAN'T GIVE 600 SHOES
. .. TO JOBLESS MEN
Stalo Law Kaepa Feat of Soma Un
amplojred From Being Newly Shod.
OFFICIALS TO HELP GIVE WORK
TO IDLE
(New York Sun, May 11,1914)
NEW TARIFF HITS U. S.
TRADE HARD
Exporta Decline and Factoriaa Slow
' Down, but Import! Jump. .
.
TREASURY DEFICIT BIG.
Wheii This War is Over
(Baltimore Sun, June 26, 1914)
11,000 MEN LAID OFF
Cut at Locomotive Works
Blamed on Rate De- ,
cision Delay.
HOURS OF WORK MADE
SHORTER
every thoughtful man knows that Europe will
no longer need to buy from us these quantities
of goods. Therefore, the work required to
make them will not exist. ':""' '
Furthermore, the millions of men who are
now in the armies of Europe will go back into
their factories and a'gain begin to manufac
ture goods to sell to us at prices based on low
wages, just as they did during the few months
.af ter the passage of the Underwood tariff bilh
There never was a plainer proposition.
If on next Tuesday you vote for Wilson, you
will vote in favor of restoring at the close of
the European war the same industrial condi
tions in this countryythat existed at the time
the war broke out. ;v
' : .' ., ; ' "
If you vote for Hughes you will vote for a
protective tariff that will prevent a return of
such conditions. We are for the full dinner
pail after the war. '
We are for continuing the smoke from our
factory chimneys when we no longer manu
facture munitions. Our whole industrial fabric,
in view of the flood of foreign products which
will overwhelm us after the war, is . r ,
(New York World, March 4, 1914)
POVERTY GREATER
, THAN IN 40 YEARS
Charity Organization Society
' Never Before Asked to Aid .
So Many Families.
(New York Sun, Dec. 31, 1914)
NEEDS OF JOBLESS
CALLED DESPERATE
Hsmry St. Settlement Worker Tells
Mayor' Committee of Terrible
' 1 Conditions.
RELIEF PLANS ADVANCED.
As Insecure as a Ranchman's Cabin With
On-coming Prairie Fire
Republican National Publicity Committee."
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