Omaha daily bee. (Omaha [Neb.]) 187?-1922, November 01, 1916, Page 7, Image 7

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    THE BEE: OMAHA, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1916.
MANY PRESIDENTS
II MM DA'UULUIUUO
Battle of Bullets Good Appren
ticeship for Battle of Bal
lots, history Shows.
LINCOLN VS. . JEFF DAVIS
By A. R, GROH.
Since we are to elect a president a
week from today, a few facts about
our presidents are interesting right
nowi ," ' '"' .. . .
Though neither of our .principal
candidates this year was ever a sol
dier, more than half of our chief ex
ecutives, were soldiers before they
were presidents. '
You probably don't know that Lin
coln was a soldier. He was a captain
of volunteers in the Black Hawk war
of 1832.
Washington, Monroe and Jackson
were soldiers in the Revolution; Jack
son, W. H. Harrison, Tyler, Taylor
and Buchanan in the war .of 1812;
Taylor, Pierce and Grant in the Mex
ican war; Grant, Hayes, Garfield, Ar
thur, . B. Harrison and McKinley in
the civil war; and Roosevelt in the
-Spanish-American war. ,
Cleveland was the only man mar-
it in the White House. He was a
tielor when elected. So was Buch-
but Buchanan remained a
helor. Monroe's daughter, Grant's
lKhter. Roosevelt's daughter and
ilson's two daughters were married
i the White House. The wives of
Tyler, Benjamin Harrison and Wilson
died in the White House. vThe only
president s child born the White
House was the second daughter of
Cleveland. - .
rresiaent jonn uuincy saams was
the son of President John Adams.
And President Harrison Was the
andson of President William Henry
arrison. ;
Lincoln-Davis Likeness.
Remarkable coincidences are noted
in the lives of Abraham Lincoln,
president of the union, and Jefferson
Davis, president ot the confederacy,
Both were born in Kentucky, Davis
in 1808 and Lincoln in 1809. Both re-
moved from that state in their child
hood, Lincoln to the" northwest,
Davis to the southwest. Both were
.in the Black Hawk war, Lincoln as
captain of volunteers and Davis as
second lieutenant of regulars. They
began their political careers in the
same year, 1844, Lincoln as a presi-,
dential elector tor Llay and Davis
for Polk. They were elected to con-
ss in consecutive years, 1845 and
16. Davis became president of the
confederacy February 8, 1861, and
Lincoln became president, of the union
Marcn 4, law. i .. ''"
Presidential Term.
The presidential term of. four years
was fixed by the constitutional con
vention. 1 he hrst report of the com
mittee there favored a term of seven
tion. In debate, various terms fromN
during good behavior to twenty
years were favored. The limit to
four years was finally adopted.
The same convention debated titles
for the president, some favoring "His
Excellency" and others "His High
ness, finally n was decided that 'it
is not proper to annex any style or
title other than that expressed in the
constitution," and therefore the ad
dress of the president is simply "The
rresiaent ot the United States. I-
Fay Templeton Comes
Tn ftamlionm Qlirvvf Itt
4.V VXllUUUl MUUl VIJ j
Word has been received at the
Orpheum that Fay Templeton comes
to that theater as the stellar attrac
tion for the week of iNovember 12.
Miss Templeton will present a reper
toire of song sketches written ex
pressly, for her by Junie McCree. Her
last pronounced success was made in
forty-five Minutes trom Broad
tratr" flna hafnr Tll.e T.nl.. .
pcared at the Orpheum. but not in.
I regular Urpheum bill, it was with
iVebep' and Fields at, a most-season
ngagcmeni.
Barney is In Again
For Selling Dope
"Barney Kemmerling is in the fed
eral toils again. Barney, the police
say, has shown his disagreement with'
congress in the enactment of the
"dope" law and has insisted on going
right ahead selling dope to such as
had the price. He is to have a pre
liminary hearing-Wednesday.
Real Mine that Nations at
War Use May Be Seen Here'
Omahans will have an opportunity
to see a real mine within two or
three days.
Not a coal mine, or a gold mine, or
anything like that. This is a marine
mine, the kind they set out in the
water and when a ship strikes it,
boom I crash I and that's the last of
that ship, i
Lieutenant Waddel of the recruit
ing office of the navy has ordered it
branch recruiting station at Fifteenth
aryt Douglas streets, I he mine is
sfSRrical in shape and about three
feet in diameter- It has an automatic
anchor, so that it can be anchored au
tomatically in any depth of water.
City Planning Expert
Is Now in the City
Charles Mulford Robinson, one of
-three city planning experts retained
by the city for work in connection
with the program of the City Planr
ning commission, has been honored
with a membership in the Town Plan
ning institute, an international body
with headquarters in London,- Eng
land. Mr. Robinson is now in Oma
ha and will attend a meeting of the
planning commission this afternoon.
Mr. Robinson will also address the
Real Estate exchange at a meeting
at the. Commercial club Wednesday
noon. 'The annual election of officers
will be held by the exchange.
Foster Holds "Mike" ,
Under $15,000 Bonds
Slike Obradovitch, 1214 South Thir
teenth street, who on October 18
killed joe Obradovitch in a fight, was
bonml over to the district court by
'once judge rosier on a cnargc 01
manslaughter, bonds were placed at
JI5,IKW. (
Auburn-Haired Wives Do Not
Break Into the Local Divorce Courts
Douglas County judges and attaches
of the divorce courts agree "with
Judge Cox of Chicago that husbands'
don't desert wives with auburn hair
(correctly called by some "red hair").
The Chicago judge, who has been
sitting on the bench in the Windy
City's divorce court for many years,
commented on the fact that the auburn-haired
women make the best
wiv . Now a few local authorities
are willing to back Judge Cox up in
his assumption.
' Miss Charlotte Martin, secretary in
the office of County Attorney Mag
uey, has-been observing wives who
Thieves Cut Three
Locks to Steal One
Large Touring Car
While Dr.'and Mrs. I. C. Wood of
3202 Woolworth avenue were peace
fully sleeping in their chambers on
east side of their home Tuesday morn
ing at 2 o'clock thieves cut through
three locks on the garage on the west
side of the house and helped them
selves to their big new touring car.
The marauders experienced some
trouble in starting the car, but fi
nally sailed into, the stone wall which
surrounds Jthe lawn of the Wood
home, with "the result, that one of the
heavy stone-copings wa5 knocked off.
Mrs. W. A. Woodard, who lives next
door at 3216 Woolworth avenue, was
awakened by the noise and telephoned
to Dr. and Mrs. Wood as soon as pos
sible, but the car thieve' had made
their getaway. '
Dr. Wood tailed in the police and
chase was given. At 9 o'clock in. the
morning the car was discovered about
a mile from the house. The joyriders
had been unfamiliar with the working
of the car and when the engine went
dead on them they had been unable
to mix ajr and gas in such fashion
as to start the car. In spite of its
collision with the stone wall the car
was very little injured.
Mystery Marks Man's
Disappearance, Hat
Found On the Bridge
The finding of a hat belonging to
John Mitchell, aged 25, night watch
man on the new Union facihe bridge,
has led the police to believe that he
fell into the river. It is. supposed
that while Mitchell was -making his
rounds he stepped into an open space
in the bridge, which is only partly
completed, lost his footing and fell.
Mitchell lives at 1009 Pacific. He
had been married for two years. Po
lice are searching for the body.
Drys to Make Four-'
Day Auto Campaign
The drys will conclude their cam
paign in Omaha with a flying squadron-
of twenty automobiles carrying
speakers who will appear in reigys
between '? p. m, and midnight, begin
ning Friday evening and continuing
to Monday evening. W. E. Phifer has
charge of this street campaign. Street
meetings will be held in Benson and
Florence. - G. - D. Taylor, Willard
Chambers and Dr. J. M. Beard have
been speaking in this territory for
the prohibitionists. Frank Harrison
and party are also out on a "dry clean
Nebraska tour.
Young Forger Held
. For District Court
Walter A. Barlow, the young man
arrested October 28 for forging a
$31.20 check over the stamp of the
W. B. Van Sant Co., was bound over
to district court by Police Judge
Foster. Barlow pleaded guilty. Bonds
were placed at $750.
A check ' for, a smaller amount
passed on the Sobotker Cigar com
pany was made good by the defend
ant's parents.
file complaints against husbands
charging desertion for the last five
years.
"I've noticed every kind of hair
on the heads of wives who visit this
office to file complaints, but in my
five years of observation I can't recall
having seen an auburn-haired
woman." '
Both Judge Day and Jydge Leslie
agree that, on the face of things,
the auburn-haired helpmates must be
the truest. . Neither could remember
of a case where a titian-haired wife
appeared in divorce court and alleged
desertion.- . '
1
Street to Be Kept -Open
All Week for
Closed par Salon
No . autos are to be parked on
Douglas street between Seventeenth
and Eighteenth streets for the re
mainder of the week because of the
closed car salon which is to be held
for the next four days on the main
floor of the Brandeis stores. Chief
Dunn has assigned six policemen to
keep this street open that it may be
used for demonstrations. It will not
be closed to traffic, but no one will
be permitted to park cars there.
The novelty of having an auto dis
play in one of the big stores seems
to have made a decided hit with the
dealers and also with the public, judg
ing from the interest which is being
manifested.
Admit Ladies Free
To Coursing Meet
Ladies will be admitted free the
opening day of the greyhound races.
which will start at the Douglas county
fair grounds for this afternoon,
and continues for the remainder of
the week. A splendid coursing meet
has just closed at Talmadge and all
the leading dogs which raced at that
point are now in the city and -ready
to run. The races are to start at 1 :30
sharp each dav.
Over 100 of the best racing grey
hounds m the United Mates are a!
ready here for the races and large
crowds are expected to witness the
events. Last year a coursing meet
was staged for the same place and the
attendance increased each day as the
crowds found what exciting sport was
in store tor them.
Dan Gaines and Fred Burlimgim
have brought their racer from O'Neill,
where he has been summering, and
have entered him in some of the main
events. The big jacks have been
brought from Kansas, where they are
booked as pests and are ready tor the
show. .
.
Bids on New Druid Hill
School Rejected by Board
1 The Board of Education rejected all
bids for new Druid Hill school build
ing and directed architect t prepare
new plans and specifications with a
view of keeping within the appropria
tion. The low bid was $10,000 more
than the board intends to allow fot
this school.
Liven Up Your Torpid Liver.
To keep your liver active use Dr. King's
New Life Pillar Thejr Insure, rood digestion
end relieve constipation. All drugglatav 26c.
Advertisement. .,
MILLARD
HOTEL
L. RENTFROW, Prop.
Comfortable, fully equipped rooms,
$1.00 a day and up..
Quick Service Lunch Room, the
"Best in the city.
Music with Meals.
'Table d'Hote Dinner, 35c.
13TH AND DOUGLAS, OMAHA.
PS.
n hi
H 111 Jr- U l II V.'fl
ibus
Largest Furniture Salesfloors In Nebraska
4U
atom
IT fKI Til
Omaha Home Furnishing Headquarters
Among New
Living Room Suites!
SMALL FRY SHUT QFF
FROM OPTION TRADE
Margin of Thirty Cents Bushel
Now Required on Deals
in Futures. .
BUSINESS ALMOST KILLED
$1.03, but the greater portion of it
sold around $1 per bushel, with that
of the new crop selling at 9999
cents. Altogether there were eighteen
carloads on sale.
Oats sold at 50tf51J4 cents per
bushel, with receipts of twenty-one
carloads.
They have shut the small fry out of
the speculative grain business and
now anyone who wants to take a flyer
in futures, unless he is a reliable re
putable and well known dealer',' is
forced to put up a margin of 30 cents
per bushel if he makes a trade.
Originally trades were made on a
margin of one-eighth of a .cent per
bushel. Then the margin went to a
cent; later to 2 cents, then it went to
5, and still later to 10 cents per hush
el. Now word comes from Chicago
that the Board of Trade is exacting
30 cents, and Omaha has dropped in
line. While this has pot curtailed the
volume of the cash, it has just about
killed off the option business. How
ever, when prices again become stable
margins are expected to go back.
On the Omaha cash grain market
there was little excitement. While
prices held firm on high-grade stuff,
there was a decided decline in all
graias of the lower grades. Wheat
was off 2 to 3 cents, corn 1 to 2 cents
and oats yi to M of a cent.
With 124 carloads of wheat on sale
the top price was $1.82. with the bulk
of it selling between $1.76 and $1.80
per bushel.
Oldcorn held the former high top,
Sandy Griswold Taken
To St. Catherine's Hospital
Sandy Griswold, who was taken ill
shortly after his return from a hunt
ing trip, has been moved from the
Fontenetle to St. Catherine's hospital,
Lithuanian Tag
Day Set for Today
South Side postofRce and Douglas
county court house" will be headquar
ters on v Wednesday for the Lithuan
ian relief fund, this day being known
as "Lithuanian Tag day," and recog
nircii in proclamations by President
Wilson and Mayor Dahlman.
The fund has been started with
$100, realized by an entertainment
given by Nonpareil Social and Ath
letic club On the honorary commit
tee re Everett Buckingham, yictor
Rosewater, t. C. Byrne and General
George H. Harries. The Stock Yards '
National bank has been named as de
pository,' : , ; . ' , i
Mayor Dahlman proclamation fol
lows: To the people of Omaha: Whereas the
pruineni ui tup tw -
nated Wednesday, November 1, as a day for
raising tunas lor nw re,iw v. - -
xtrlrken Lithuanians, many of whom are
without the necessities of life; therefore,.
' I, James C. Dahlman, mayor of the elty
of Omaha, do hereby proclaim Wednesday,
November 1; aa a day for the collection of
funds on the streets of our city for the re
lief ot these destitute and starvlne Uth
uanlana Let us respond sonorously to tMs call for
help. . '
Q-BAN REVIVES
COLOR GLANDS
Darkens Gray Hair Naturally
' Q-Ban Hair Color Restorer is no
dye, but acts on the roots, making
'hair and scalp healthy and restoring
the color glands of the hair. So if
your hair is gray, faded, bleached,
prematurely gray, brittle or falling,
apply Q-Ban Hair Color Restorer (as
directed on the tiottle), to Hair and
scalp. In a short time all your gray
hiir will be restored to an even deli
cate, dark shade and entire head of
hair will become soft, fluffy, long,
thick'and of such an even beautiful
da'rk color no one could tell you had
applied Q-Banv Also stops dandruff
and falling hair, leaving your hair
fascinating and - abundant without
even' a trace of-' gray. Sold on a
money-back guaranf . 50 cents fof
a big bottle at Sherman & McCon
nell's Drug Stores, Omaha, Neb. Out-of-.town
folks supplied by mail. Adv.
Superior
Values at
Equal Price.
u
n
16 IV DODGE tf DOUGLAS STREETS
Equal
Values at :
Lets Price.
, ' u
A Remarkable Sale of Tailored Suits
Nearly 600 Handsome New Suits
500 of These Garments Made to Our Special Order and Nearly
100 Elegant Samples . ' .
Go On Sale Here Thursday, at
25. to 50 Off Regular Prices 1
Your Choice of Any Velvet Suit
In Our Entire Stock, Thursday
Va Off Regular Price
50 HIGH-CLASS SAMPLE SUITS
v At 33V3 Discount Thursday.
OVER 200 ELEGANT NEW SUITS
Made to sell to $59, fabrics are vel
vets, velours, broadcloths and fine
novelties, nearly all beautifully fur
trimmed ; all sizes and colorsat . . V .
s
29
75
Clay Suit, that sold up' to $39.00, in
Broadcloths, Serges, Gabardines and
Poplins, big assortment, all tf hTC
e
sizes 14 to 46; many
them fur trimmed
of
Nobby New Suits, made to sell to $25.00.
in Poplins, .Serges, Whipcords and Nov-;
elties; best colors and r n7C-
atvlAa; fill !?. in thin V I 119.
sale, at, . i. . .,, .,
s aiiu m
13i
Seldom in a lifetimwill you find such a splendid . opportunity .for .profitable suit
buying in mid-season. Each group holds its full quota of fashionable charm, appeal
ing appropriate for the new season dependable materials and conscientious work
manship characterize all offerings. . , , ,'!'- '
pay. TRY HAYDEN'S, FIRST -j?,i
The Suite here pictured in part is '
carefully built of select oak stock
throughout and shown in two fin- (
ishes, nut brown, turned and golden
polished. The upholstery is best Span
ish fabricoid, one of the most dur
able, sanitary and good looking up
holstery materials made, suite in
cludes a massive arm chair to match
the rocker and Duofold pictured.
Other Duofold Suites priced from
837.5U to S75.UO
fa
Desire sWother Is ah
AMothers
ealthyBaby
That's a loyal and natural feeling all mothers have. Then make
your dpslre an assurance by using "Mother's Friend." Its beneficial
qualities will conserve your own health and strength and make baby's
coming easier and Its future health secure. Get It at your druggist.
Send for the free book.
j TKeBradlieldReiMaWCo. ?1 lawarBldjj, AtWsCaf-
T
i
Revealing Today
the .Chalmers Sedan
I am revealing today the newest creations in Chalmers cars. The body is
different from anything you have seen.
And the lines are different too very refreshing, like a breath of crisp autumn
air drawn deep into the lungs. - t T
The body strikes a new note. It is a compromise between a limousine and an
open touring car. A limousine in winter. A touring car in summer.
You simply remove the windows with their , supporting frame, put them away
in a Special cod partment back of the rear seat. It's but a few moments work
and the transformation is complete. ' - '
The top is a permanent roof, built and trimmed as a part of the body not
one of the so-called detachable type tops.
I could go on at length Bedford cloth upholstery, silk curtain t rear win
dow, reading lamp, a dome lamp, which lights when the door is open. But I
prefer to tell you all this and far more when you see the car.
The price t am proud of. I didn't know it could be done. $1780 Detroit
R. W. CRAIG, Inc.
Exhibit at Closed Car Salon: 2512-14 Farnam St.
1
Quality First