Omaha daily bee. (Omaha [Neb.]) 187?-1922, April 14, 1915, Page 5, Image 5

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    SLAYS SWEEPING
DOWN MOUNTAINS
Immense Armies of Russia Swiftly
More Toward Plains of
Hungary.
JOFTRE IS HAMMERING WEDGE
LONDON, April 13. With the
capture by the Russians of almost all
the main chain of mountains, the bat
tle of the Carpathians, which has
lasted upward of eighty days, Is ap
parently reaching a termination over
one extensive front and the Russians
are said to be moving at various
points, by railways and roads and
along the rivers and streams down
the southern elopes toward the plains
of Hungary.
This movement, If it continues suc
cessfully, will, In the view of the
Russian military authorities, compel
the retirement, with little or no fight
ing, of the Austrians and Germans
who are atill north of the Carpathi
ans to the east of Uzsok pass in
eastern Galicia and Bukowina.
Prnlee for Slavs.
The battle which ha been thua success
fully conducted by the Russians was,
from sll accounts, one of the fiercest of
the war, and the manner in which the
Russians overcame the difficulties of
mountain fighting In midwinter has been
the subject of praise by those who wit
nessed the operations or are acquainted
with the country traversed.
The first phase of the battle of the
Woevre also apparently has come to an
end. and Interest now centers on the next
move of General Joffre, the French com
mander, in his effort to compel the Ger
mane to release thrlr hold on St. Mlhlel
and that part of the plain of the Woevre
Included in their wedge.
The capture of Lea Espargea was. In
the opinion of British military critics, a
long step in the direction desired by the
allies, but they place even more im
portance on the advance, from Regnlevlllo
toward Thlacourt In the south, aa the lat
ter town Is a railway center from which
the force at St. Mlhlel draws Its supplies.
Germans Reinforced.
This battle has not as yet proved the
prelude to a general offensive in the west,
as was expected. This Is probably due to
the fact that. Instead of moving troops
from other points along the line to assist
the army of the Woevre, the Germans
have brought their reinforcements from
the Interior of Germany, or perhaps right
frim the eastern front, and consequently
the situation remains comparatively quiet
on the western front.
The mystery of the North Sea firing on
Wednesday night last remains unsolved,
ao far as the general public public la con.
cerned.
FIRST PHOTO OF CHARLES SEYMOUR WHITMAN,
jr., only son of the governor of the state of New York, 1
month old on Sunday last, ia the arms of his fond father.
iYILLA BOMBARDMENT IS ON
Northern Leader Begins Shelling
Carranra Trenches Across from
Brownsville.
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Seymour Lake Club
Members at Smoker
i A stag smoker for the smoking mem
. bers of the Seymour Lake Country club
was held at the College Inn Cafe, 216
! South Eighteenth street, last night. .
That the club Is about to open on the
most promising season of lta existence
was declared by the many loyal members
who attended.:
T. I Combs served as toastmaeter and
called on the following men for brief
remarks; John Beklns, president; George
McDonald, H. C. Forster, . R. E. Sunder
land, A. C. Kugel, T. G. Travis, Albert
Cahn, W. J. Norman and G. W. Brewer,
The affair was a Dutch treat and F. B.
Snodgrass, proprietor of the cafe anl
former officer of the Seymour Lake club,
had a feast for the party that was do-
cldedly "big stuff."
Id southeast of Ma leery; on the from be.
ween Maicery and Marcheville, and south
of Hartmans - Weilerkopf. Everywhere
they were repulsed.
'The French are reported to have
thrown ir0 bombs upon the station and
the foundry at Bruges, according to their
own announcement. In reality nine bombs
fell In the eastern suburbs of Bruges and
two near Bruges itself without doing any
damage.
"German troops have thrown large
Germans Display a
Disdain for Death
PARIS, April 12. There has been given
but In Paris a description by an eye wit
ness of the attempt made by the Germans
on April 8 and to retake a small fort
at Beausejour held by the French. -
Two companies of volunteers led In this
attack. They showed an absolute con
tempt for death, but nevertheless they
were stopped by the fire of the French
artillery and infantry. . Only a few of
them escaped. '
Child Takes Poison;
Grief Over Spanking
SALT LAKE CITY. April 11-Nellls
Sprattling, years old, daughter of a
farmer In Salt Lake City, killed herself
with carbolic acid last night as a re
suit of grief over punishment administered
by her mother. The child quarreled with
an older sister and was spanked for It
ROUNDHOUSE FOREMAN
RECEIVES FATAL INJURIES
While crossing a railroad track near
the west end of the Burlington yards at
Ashland yesterday. Nona a. nargaaine
round-house foreman, was struck by a
r,.un switch enaine and received in
Juries which resulted in his death In an
Omaha nosoital late in the afternoon.
Bnth leas were severed.
tj.raniin wn 50 years old and had
been In railroad service the greater part
of his life. He had lived In Ashland since
mi mnA lonvea a widow and two dauKh-
ters there. One daughter lives In Bast-
wood, N. T.
WAR OFFICE REPORTS
Kreack.
PARIS. April ll-(Vla London)-The
French war department official state
ment given out this afternoon says:
"Between the sea and the Alsne there
Is nothing to leport except a few artil
lery duels.
"To the east of Berry Au Bsc we gained
the possession of a German trench.
"In the Argonne there were mining
operations and engagements of bomb and
grenade throwing between our own and
the enemy's trenches.
"Between the Meuse and the Moselle
eur forces succeeded at several points in
coming In contact with the wire entangle
ments of the enemy's defenses."
tirraaaa.
BERI1N, April la. (By Wlrcl.-i to
Payvllle.) The German Var office has
given out a report on the progress of hos
tilities dated April 13, which reads:
"The French yesterday attacked near
terry-Au-Bac and between the Meuse
Si.d the Moselle; near Maicery. which Is
ast of Verdun; near Marcheville. hkh
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k- 1 i f" j. tf"jN'
1 iHSBr &
A. A
nil s". Sitfcj!Sts
mTIIM iSHO esses?
quantities of bombs Into Toperlnghe,
razebrouke and Kossel, towns occupied
by British troops.
"At a point northeast of Sultpes the
enemy again has made use of projectiles
developing an asphyxiating gas.
"There has been fighting day and night
in the forest of Le Petre, In which the
Germans slowly gained ground.
"There has been no change on the east
ern front."
RIFLE BATTLE IN THE WOODS
BROWNftVILLH, Tex.. April U -The
long expected bombardment of Mala
moroa. Mex.. by Villa artillery began to
day and the direction of fire and com
parative accuracy of the marksmanship j
trought distinct relief from fears for the
tafety of Brownsville.
One three-Inch field piece opened the
bombardment and later a second gun
Joined In. About two doaen shells were
fired up to noon. The cannon were hid
den In the bushes about a mile and A
half from the trenches west of Mata-
moros. The first few shells were not t.io
high, some of them passing completely
over Matemoros before exploding. One
shell exploded near the American consulate.
VMS net Ranae.
The direction of the fire was such that.
no matter how far the cannon overshot,
the shells would not carry Into Browns
ville. After a few nflnutes the Villa artil
lerymen got the range, dropping several
shells near the trenches.
The cause of the cannonading was a
sortie of about 1,WM Carrania cavalry
men and Infantrymen who poured over
the twelve foot embankment of the west
ern entrenchments arid started toward
Las Ruclas, the headquarters of General
Jose Hodrlgues, commander of tho Villa
forces, four miles distant.
The Mexican end of the International
bridge was closed and a tight censorship
put on Matamoros. Apparently, however,
the sortie was aimed at capturing some
of the Villa cannon In the woods about
half a mile west of the trenches. There
was heavy firing In these woods.
The rifle battle In the woods continued
hot until an hour after the sortie. Then
the Carrania forces retreated leisurely
toward their trenches.
Takes fltaael Brlda-e.
Colonel A. P. Blockson, commanding
the post here, stationed himself on the
International bridge during the cannon
ading. Cavalry patrols held spectators
back out of danger. Before noon the
Carrania troops had returned to their
trenches and Villa cavalry had followed
tl.em to within less than a mile of the
defenses. The artillery fire had stopped
except for an occasional shot.
At the Matamoros end of the Interna
tional bridge Carrania officers said the
sortie had completely disorganised the
Villa lines Investing Matamoros.
It was announced that one Villa cannon
was captured, also a train containing a
large part of the Villa provisions and a
conslderble number of prisoners, and that
a few A Ilia wounded also had hern
brought In.
Permission to enter Matamoros and con
firm the reports was refused.
PLANS BEING DRAWNFOR
NEW BRANDEIS GARAGE
As soon as the First Presbyterian con
gregation Is ready to abandon It- old
cl-urch at ventcenth and Podge Micrta
the Branded Interests, who recently pur
chased that property, will ro ahead with
the tearing down of the building ar1 the
erection of a new garage for the Bran
dels delivery cars. Tentative plans are
being drawn for the new garage by .John
Latenser, architect. The First Pre shy
terlan hss not yet begun the construc
tion of its new church edifice, but they
expect to occupy quarters temxrarlly
somewhere In the city until the new
hurch an be completed,
Refuse alarm.
Pitcher Heinle Rrrgrr and Outfielder
T'-ert Kltig have refused to sign the con
tracts with reduced salaries tendered
them hv the Nashville club of the South,
ern league.
Woman's Club to
Havo Birthday
The Woman s club will celebrate iU
twenty-second birthday Friday evening
April iX with a musical In the clul
room. The program will be In charge o
tho music department. On Arbor day :
tree will be planted on the Lincoln high
way under the direction of the conserva
tion committee.
VETERAN LETTER CARRIER FINDS
RELIEF AFTER LONG SUFFERING
S. F. Stevens Is Congratulated
By Host of Friends on
Regaining Health.
Samuel F. Stevens, formerly chair
man of the executive board of the Na
tional Association of Letter Carriers,
who has also served as president of thu
Cincinnati and San Francisco branches,
is being congratulated by his friends
throughout the United States on hl.i
complete recovery from rheumatism
that caused him excrulcating pain ac
frequent intervals for eight years. He
is telling them that Akos, the wonderful
California medicinal mineral discover
ed by J. D. MacKenzic, president and
manager of the Nut lira Company of San
Francisco, cured him In one month.
. He resides at 143 Hickory avenue. So
grateful was he that he wrote the Nr
tura Company as .follows:
"That I am able to carry mail today
is surely due to the groat curative pow
ers of Akos. I had rheumatism for
eight years and suffered excruciating
pains all through my body. During one
severe attack my weight dropped from
184 to 90 pounds and I was confined to
my bed three months. In June, 1113,
a similar attack started, and I had to
quit work for more than a month.
"Learing of Akox, I tried the Inter
nal treatment and also used the Akox
compound externally on my swollen
joints, with the result that I was com
pletely cured In one month. It la surely
the greatest remedy I have ever found.
I have no hesitancy In recommending I:
warn
1st V-- ' r
I - . v I,
HSotMiorExaEilo PioBi
Exchanged Pianos
$2450 Herlich S 85
$275 Norwood $100
$300 Baua $135
$375 Steger & Sons.S150
$125 Emerson SZ00
$300 Arion $155
$450 Knabe $175
$275 SchmoUer' &
Mueller $125
$450 Steger & Bona. $2 10
$350 Schilling $108
$300 Schmoller &
Mueller $150
$500 Chickering &
Sons , $125
$550 Hantaan . . . .$250
$1,000 Chickering & Sons
Urand $200
$1,100 Steinway
Grand $400
Freo Stool. Free Scarf
Free Life Insurance
With Every Piano Sold
During This Sale.
SOD DAYS FREE TRIAL
To Any Responsible Family
Wa tll the World's Beat Piano- tnd Player PJanot,
including: inch great makes as Steinway, Weber, Hard
man, Steger & Sons, Emerson, McFh&il, Lindeman & Sons,
Schmoller & Mueller, and the complete line of Aeolian
Pianola Pianos.
New
Upright
Pianos
of eataelUhtd reputation,
wet toae and delightful
action. Latest style walnut
r Bahfraay eases.
Tks sale srfoe....,
$175
Sold on Small
MontWy Payments
New
Player
Pianos
from the world's greKt
manifactarers. Conpletoty
eqaipped. The eqaal at awtaj
leooplayrra abwi $9 AC
IrVBrV
Sold on Small
MontWy Payments
Complete Assortment of the Latest
Styles of Victrolas and Columbia
Grafonolas, also a fine line of Records
and Supplies.
SCIOLLER & MUELLER PIAUO GO.
Oldest and Best Piano
House In the Wast
1311-13 Farnan Street, Qnaha
I1KVZL T. STBTBITS.
because of the quick and effective re
lief it gives, and also because It is In
no way harmful or disagreeable."
Thousands of others have alao writ
ten the Natura Company regarding- the
great relief afforded them by Akoc in
cases of rheumatism, stomach trouble,
catarrh, plies, ecsems, ulcers and other
ailments.
Akos is now being demonstrated and
sold at Sherman aV McConnell's 16th
and Dodge St. store. Vlalt, phone or
writs the Akox man In charge for fur
ther information regarding this advertisement.
Shorter Skirts Call for
the Smartest Footwear
The present tyle of ladies' apparel
have emphasized footwear as the most
effective note in a woman's costume.
"The well gowned woman who la fastidious in ber dress
will find at this store all the styles that are now being
worn In the largest Eastern cities. Today we illustrate
one of the new dainty Pumps we show in patent calf
or dull leather, at
$fi)i0$.50
IT
and
WW.
SHOE-G9
16 X& DOUGLAS.
RECTAL SPECIALIST
Dr. Tarry's mild ayatem of treatment cures Hilex, Klatulas and other Ttectal
dlkeasra, 1" a xhort time, without a surgical operation. No Chloroform, Kther or
any other gt-neral anaratlietic used. A cure guarant-d in every rase accepted for
li-lM'cnt. mid no money to be paid until cured. Writ for book on Kectal dta
tases coutalulng teslimonlulB of ruinlnnt people who have becu iraiauenily curtl
UK. TAlllti lie building OuiaJis,
"Murder Upon
' "It Was the Captain's
the Hi Seas
Fault"'
These expressions voice the conclusions of the pro-Allies and pro-German
press on the destruction by German submarines of the non-combatant mer
chant vessels Falaha and Aguila and the consequent death of more than one
hundred of the passengers and crews.
Read THE LITERARY DIGEST for April 10, and you will learn
the trend of public opinion in this country as exprest by newspapers of all
convictions, thus enabling you to pass fair judgment as to whether or not
this incident is contrary to all the rules of civilized warfare.
THESE STIRRING SUBJECTS CONCERN YOU
Get all the facts in this week's issue
Germany as a Land of Plenty
Pampered Prisoners
Political Mutterings in Russia
Saving ML Vernon
John Wesley as a Physician
War's Effect on Catholicism
French and English as the
World Languages
Persian Christians Massacred
by Moslems
The busiest of busy people can spare two hours weekly to read THE
LITERARY DIGEST. Even in this short time, were they to read nothing
else, they can learn more about all the subjects that concern mankind
everywhere than could he who spends many hours in indiscriminate reading.
Get the Issue for April 10th, NOW, from the News-dealer 10 Cents
"ALL THE PERIODICALS IN ONE"
lie jteisij Uigpt
FUNK & WAGNALLS COMPANY (Publiibcn of the Fimoui NEW Standard Dictionary), NEW YORK