Omaha daily bee. (Omaha [Neb.]) 187?-1922, November 01, 1913, NEWS SECTION, Image 1

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    The Omaha DAiig Bee
NEWS SECTION
THE WEATHER.
Fair; Warmer
?AGES ONE TO TEN
VOL. XLin NO. 117.
OMAHA, SATURDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 1, 1D13-TWEN1T PAGES.
SINGLE COPY TWO CENTS.
flCM FEDERALS
monnrnrn r rr up
Fhl I II II I I I lllll
Sf
FROM CHIHUAHUA
Troop Trains Carrying Garrison
Start Northward Comman
ders Fear Loyalty.
mr i mi in a m i nr ywt niirrn
Expressed that Vill Will Mas
sacre Orozco's Hen.
nv. vtmtrr. kv.au tttv. otty
s Force Succeeds in Eluding
Fonr Federal Generals.
. nt at. hi. r . n n iu n i-. n n. r .
senger Ship Hound for Ha
vana Off 1'ort of l'ro
gresso. DALLAS, Tex., Oct. 81. A dlapatoh to
fin mi hi iiHWR i i ttiii ni m. m-nyw luuu
Chlhuhua City, Mexico, was ovaou-
by federals ycstenlay, leaving the
r-i v nnnn n rnnnis-n xx. u rifiiii rpmHi hiii:ii
by Paneho Villa's rebels. Villa's men
had occupied the outskirts of Chihuahua
before the abandonment. The federals
Were said to have retreated toward
Juarez. The dispatch adds:
"Thousands of American and Mexican
citizens who wcro unable to board the
ten troop trains are panic stricken. They
have no means of getting away from the
incKen cuy ana ienr in ncm lor ineir
lives. Many believe that followers of
Oroxco will be given no quarter by Villa
during tho occupation of the state
capital. What few residents of the city
have horses and wagons are following
In the wake of the military trains, carry
ing all their possessions with them."
The fear for Orozco's sympathizers Is
based on resentment expressed-by rebels
against blm for fighting In tho federal
ftrmy.
General Dlaa Transferred.
VERA CltUZ, Oct. St General Felix
Dlai and his companions put to sea to
day on board the American battleship
Michigan, to which they had been trans
ferred by Bear Admiral Fletcher from
the flagship Louisiana, Tho course of
the Michigan was laid for Havana. No
publlo anouncemont of the departure of
the fugitives was made and friends of
General Diaz on shore were unaware this'
tnornlng that he had left.
Two German warships, the. Hertha and
the Bremen, are now In this port, the
Bremen having just arrived from St.
Thomas, .
WASHINGTON, Oct. Jf General Felix
&iaa,andh,la. party are bound te a point
off Progi-esso, Yucatan, where they will
be transferred to a New York and Cuba
mail steamship. This information reached
the Navy department tddajr in a dispatch
from Rear 'Admiral Fletcher, commanding
the American squadron in Mexican waters.
The battleship Michigan, carrying the
refugees, Should reach Progresso tomor
row. Admiral- Fletcher did not say on
what vessel the refugees would soil and
no mention was made of their ultimate
destination.
President Wilson and Counsellor John
Basset Mooro of the State department
. discussed the Mexican situation today at
length. As mpst of tho members of the
cabinet wero Away there was no session
of the presldcht'a official family. Since
the president will go to Princeton to vote
next Tuesday there will be no cabinet
-jneetlng then, and except for Informal
consideration in the Interval it Is not
INcely that any plan of action will be dis
cussed at a cabinet meeting Until late
jaext week.
There was nothing to indicate any
prospects of earlier action. Mr. Moore
did not discuss his talk with the presi
dent. x
The president had no other engage
ments today, planning to devoto himself
tor the moat part to tho Mexican situa
tion and the currency problem.
Rebel's Driven from Monterey.
MEXICO CJTT, Oct. 31.-An army of
t,000 rebels, commanded by General Fran
cisco Villa, known as "Pancho" Villa, is
advancing today on the city of Chlhua
bus, having eluded the federal troops
commanded by four general Francisco
STastro, Marcelo Caravero, Javier HoJa4
(Continued on Page Two.)
i
The Weather
Forecast till 7 p. m, Saturday:
Kor Omaha, Council Bluffs and Vicinity
fr-J?air tonight and Saturday; slowly rising
temperature.
hnuntnn at Omaha Yeaterdar
Hours. weg.
5 a. ni M
7 ai m.'.'.'!.'""".'"'
8 a.', m.. .' 23
9 a. m..., 7
11 a' m.'.'.'"".'!"!""
12 m...
J P. m 1
5 ? S h
t p. rn;r.!!'.".'"
G p. m 42
7 n' uu.'.'.'i.'.'....W
g p. m fc, i
Comparative Lucul ii-cord. i
1913. lvii nil. 1510.
Highest yesterday 6 45 Si
Lowest yesterday S2 35 29 40
Mean temperature 33 40 37 62
Precipitation 00- T ,OJ .00
Temperature and precipitation depar
tures from the normal:
Normal temperature 48
Deficiency for the day is
Total deficiency since March 1 453
Normal precipitation , .07 inch
Deficiency for the day 07 inch
Total rainfall since March 1...S0.XG Inchn
Deficiency since March 1 6.92 Inches
iscuciency lur tur. icnou, isji. z.y incnts
Deficiency for cor. period, 1911.14.41 Inches
Ueports from Stations at 7 P. M.
Ftatlon and State Temp High-Rain-
fr weather. 7 p.m. est fall.
( hr' enne e-loudy 40 W .00
1 enpi rt. clear 86 40 .00
I n.i 1 Jear 38 41 .M
I s Moines, clear 38 4 .00
l-tnae- lear 33 46 .00
North Matte, clear 40 4 .00
iah.i, clear 40 44 .00
'i eblo. lear 42 4 .00
ftab.d City, clear 40 45 .00
Fait Lake City, clear..'... 54 .0)
Santa K, cloudy 44 S! T
Sheridan, clear 36 4i .0)
Sioux City, clear 3S ft .00
.Valentine, clear 42 4S .00
T indicates trace of precipitation
U A, WELSH, Local Forecaster.
Methodist Men
Adopt Report of
Polioy Committee
INDIANAPOLIS, Oct SI. The new re
port of the policy committee of the Na
tional Convention of Methodist Men was
adopted unanimously today and without
debate. Bishop W. P. McDowell of Chi
cago, who read the report asked that it
bo accepted without debate, so that the
spirit of the message would not be de
stroyed. Tho report In brief declares for a
palgn of personal evangelism;
bringing up of the youth In
for tho dedication of ono-te
income to tho church; for the!
all boards created by tho cB"u; to
assist In civic. Industrial, social and
educational uplift and to reaffirm tho
action- of tho general church on higher
education, for large funds for poorly
paid ministers and for the cause of
temperance.
Tho resolutions also contain a state
ment made yesterday pleading for the
evangelizing of the world nnd accepting
responsibility for 16O.P00.0OJ people.
Boforo the adoption of tho report an
attempt was made to Include a resolu
tion in behalf of tho superannuated
ministers, but this failed.
Another, resolution Introduced by the
business committee urged tho laity to
assist the district superintendent in
adopting tho new financial scheme in all
tho churches.
Bishop McDowell, In explaining the re
port, said all the activities of the church
were not included for the reason the
committee did not wish to burden It
with "details to tho exclusion of Its
spiritual force.
"This Is not a convention for the pass-Ing-
of the tariff bill or for the revising
or vjo currency." said tho bishop. "It
Is a convention solely for stimulating
interest In the kingdom of God."
Mrs, Wilson
Gets Back Job
for Man Fired
WASHINGTON, Oct. 31.-Mrs. Wood
row Wilson has taken an active inter
est In the betterment of conditions under
which girls and women work here in the
various government departments.
It leaked out today that she made a
tour through tho big govemmont prlnU
Ing office yesterday without revealing
her Identity, and thought the vomen
workers did not have sufficient space in
the recreation or rest rooms. She is
said to bave urged the president to help
improve conditions.
Mrs. Wilson also is urging Fostmastsr
General Burleson to Improve the mall bag
repair department of tho postofflce.
She recently vslted the establishment and
became convinced that more precautions
ought to be taken to prevent tuberculous
and other disease germs from .affecting
those who work on the bags.
A lively little sequel to Mrs. Wilson's
visit developed today. When Publlo
Printer Ford heard of Mrs. Wilson's visit
he discharged.!!. E. Terry, the messenger
. i
!....... .. - -
ilr T . lnroun lno
uuf ln" un? M not
urouBTH. w rresiaenrs wire to head-1
QUarter" !
-..." eP'nea mat ne asKed Mrs. I
w son to visit Ford's office, but Mrs.
wuson uomurreo, saying she wished ni
special aiienuons. rora. however, main-
tainea that Terry failure to make
known the visit of the president's wlfo '.
was a oreann or. discipline.
When the story got around the capital ,
there were several hurried telephone calls
to the White House. Mrs. Wilson took I
n I . nil In , Y. s . . .1 1 . - . '
n ,u ti.iv utvvccuiiuiH anu alter i
Secretary Tumulty had given some di
rections to the printing office, TerrJ
promptly was put back on his Job.
Commissioners
Discuss Safety
for Travelers
, 3VASHINOTON, Oct Sl.-Meaaa of b.
ialnlfig the highest degree of safety in
railroad travel formed the keynote of
today's final proceedings of the annual
ponvention of the National Association of
Railway Commissioners. . .
Commissioner Kilpatrick of Illinois in
a report on "Safety ADolisnces." -urred
immeaiaie ana aennlte action looking to
Hujr m ruirooa travel.
Commissioner Sague of New York was
of the opinion that the operation of the
standard signaling system with the over
lap "would have prevented much of the
recent accidents on the New Haven
road." Ho added, however, that the
"human equation" was a considerable
factor In the operation of any sort of
safety device and pointed out that many
railroads had reduced the speed of their
iraino, inui increasing tue safety of
travel, in his Judgment. CO per cent
116 'ev"1 reduction of exeesslvo
speed was an advantage not only to the
public, but to the railroads as well,
"thus afforJ,n " Impressive example
f the folly of high speed competition.
It Is better policy to run trains behind
time than to take long chances at ao-
cldenta," he said.
Upon the conclusion of the routine
bU8'hes of the convention and the in-
auction or me new onicers into their
positions the convention adjourned until
nevt year.
President Finn announced that he
would appoint the committee on valua
tion, which Is to co-operate with the In.
teratate Commerce commission at a later
date.
Body of Boy Buried
By Cave-in Picked
Up by Steam Shovel
CLEVELAND. O.. Oct. 31 -The body of
John Sobozak, 9 years old, who had been
missing from his home since June 14 last
was lifted in a steam shovel being used
in excavation work from a gravel bank
here this afternoon.
The head was missing from the por
tion of the body first found, but it was
dug from the bank a few minutes later
by workmen. Identification was made
by the police. The coroner expressed the
opinion that the boy had been buried ac
cidentally in a cave-In while at play.
COMMITTEE DECIDES
UPON JIB BANKS
Hitchcock and 0'Gorman. Vote with
Republicans Against Adminis
tration Supporters.
WHITE HOUSE
Fat for Greater
of Reserve Centers.
REEMENT TENTATIVE ONE
Board is Given Privilege of Making
Additions.
ACTION EARNESTLY OPPOSED
Rrgnlar Members Make Strenuous
But Futile Fift-ht to Carry Oat
the Wishes of Presi
dent. '
WASHINGTON. Oct. ai. The senate
banking and currency committee tonight
tentatively agreed on four regional re
serve banks for the proposed now cur
rency system, with a provision that after
two years th efederal reserveboard may
add as many additional banks as it deem
necessary, not exceeding twelve. The
pending bill fixes the number at twelve
and it has been understood the adminis
tration would not ctfhsent to have It re
duced below nine.
Tho sharp reduction in tho number of
roserve bonks was tho first radical
amendmont tho committee has agreed
upon and It was earnestly opposed by
the administration supporters in the com
mittee. Senators 0'Gorman and Hitch
cock, however, voted with the five re
publicans for the reduction, leaving but
flye democrats, Owen, Pomerene, Hollts,
Iteed and hatroth bohlnd the administra
tion proposal. Tho White House was silent
tonight as to the committee's, action. It
has been generally supposed that the
president Igorously opposed cutting tho
number below nine.
The administration supporters contested
every step in th ereduotlon of the num
ber of regional banks. Two of them voted
to retain th enumber at twelve and three
voted for ten bonks. The proposal to fix
the number at eight was defeated, seven
to ftvo, and by th esame vota. the number
was fixed at four. The proposition to In
sert th eprovlslon that the federal re
serve board might increase the number
after two years, Up to twelve, was voted
Into the bill wtih only two members op
posing it.
Miners Expected to.
Give TJp Tb.eir.Ai'ifls
Without: a Conflict
DENTKK. Colb.. Oct Attn, ef-
tviia w ujBHiiu nriiviiui'ij iarw om-
era in th.e LUdlow tent colony wlU not be
era m
m(ld6 untu tomorrow. This was the In.
formation received today by Governor
Amnions in a telephone conversation with
Adjutant General John Chase. At the
time Chase was in tho Ludlow tent col
'0ny with John It. Lawson. an official of
the United Mine Workers of America.
Negotiations for the peaceable surrender
of arms by strikers were under way, and
it wsj said these wou d continue through
out the day. It was not the Intention of
Genetal Chose to have the troops which
earlier left Trinidad, enter the tent colony
. .
icmi iy.
General Chase reported to the governor
that the situation was quiet
The artillery and cavalry which started
for Ludlow tht morning to force a dls
armament of the strikers in 'that dis
trlct were ordered back to thTrlnIdad
camp at noon today.
General Chasa .announced .that no
further attempt taVilrpi tbV Xudlow
-strikers would blMpe(Hri.lio; out
come of a contieWietf-betWeeiFlhe ad
jutant general, Jli0.TwifMu'&lstrlct
organlter of theTsTJnlted' 'MlrfeJ'WorkeRi
of America, and .governor Amnions.
This afternoon tlie governor stated that
General Chase and John It Lawson had
i-eached an agreement whereby the
strikers In the. Ludlow tent colony will
turn over their arms to the militia to
morrow.
SEX HYGIENE WILL BE
TAUGHT AT ST. LOUIS
ST. LOUIS, Mo., Oct. 31. Sex hygiene,
sanitation and other matters of health
will be taught the children of the St
Louis publlo schools one hour each week,
It was announced by the superintendent
of schools today. Subjects of the new
health course will be printed In the
monthly bulletin Issued by the city health
commissioner.
EMBEZZLER IS GIVEN
TERM IN SING SING
NEW YORK, Oct. Sl-Nathanlel Laird,
superintendent of a Sunday school, was
sentenced today to serve not less than
one year nor more than four years in
Sing Sing prison for the larceny of
119,000 from his employers, tho Kenslco
Cemetery company, Laird's peculations
extended over two years. The money he
said was spent In high living.
TOMORROW
Tht B0H
Colored
Comics
with The
4 Sunday Bee
SLAP AT. THE
From the Denver Post
THOMAS ISSUES STATEMENTBoss Murphy Cited to
Says Resolutions Commending Him
Withheld by His Request.
GIVES LETTERS IN THE CASE
Supplements Statement that School-
masters' Club Conspired Against
Htm irlth Full Corre
spondence. XDARNDT, Neb., Oct. Jt-(BpecIal Tel
egram.) President A. O. Thomas of the
Kearney Normal school in a 9,000-word'
statement, issued tonight flatly accuses
tii'e majority of 'the etate Board, of 'Hdu
cation of malicious' falsehood in charglnr
rfilniwlth Hislng the offer of J7.000 post-
tlon In ArkanMs''aa a club to fore an
ncrsase in his salary as head, of the rfear
ney Normal school. Ha brands as fabrl
catlofar the thin charges tiled by the
board' following its unprecedented action
In dismissing hint without notice from the
stewardship of the Kearney Normal
school.
Dr. Thomas said!
"It can be shown that the 'inner circle'
is back or this and that my only offense
has been ',thit I havo been sinned against.
I acted Under the sssltlon that a real
opportunity existed tor me In tho south,
but the offer of' this position was not
used Inuiy manner to Influence the Btato
Board of Education. On tho contrary, a
resolution passed by the Kearney Com
mercial club commending my work, In
tended to be forwarded to the state board,
was withheld at my request"
Dr. Thomas charge the majority mem
bers of the State Board of Education
and especially Prof. A. L. Cavlnesa and
Thomas J. Majors with conspiracy
against his good name in laying the plot,
with malice prepense, to have, him ousted
from the presidency of the Kearney Nor
mal school,
Concerning the Arkansas proposition
Dr. Thomas professes his willingness to
show that the offer was bona fide and
that he had a right to act on It as ho
did; maintaining, however, that the offer
was not at any time, used to browbeat
any member of the board or any educa
tional faction In Nebraska into doing his
bidding or to advance his personal in
terests in Nebraska.
Dr. Thomais reiterates that the School -masters'
Club of Nebraska exerts a bale
ful influence on educators and educa
tional InsituUons, Hecame within the
pale of Its 'displeasure, he nays, and
there was no letup In the silent fight
against him until a majority of the
members of the board had been "cinched"
and the matter of his dismissal could
be brought to a vote with foreknowledge
of the result,
Informally Dr. Thomas supplemented
his written statement which covers the
whole case from beginning to end, giv
ing correspondence bearing on the mat
ter, with the declaration that he would
retain his presidency of the school until
the trouble had been reviewed and passed
upon by the court.
MTI. KINO OROWH EXCITED
Says Schoolmasters Never would
I'nt Up a Ravr Peal.
(From a Staff Correspondent.)
LINCOLN. Oct 31.-(Kpeclal.)-Aocord-
Ing to Tt C. King, recently o fthe state
superintendent's office, but who has
been sent to Kearney as registrar an
business manager of the Normal school,
and who admits ten yars membership In
the Schoolmasters' club, that organiza
tion (s above reproach.
Yesterday he met a representative of
The Be and "with flashing eye and
crimson cheek, which foretells the
thought before he speaks," and with
arms waving in the air while he pounded
one fist with the other, he wanted tho
newspaper man to understand that the
Schoolmasters' flub was composed of
good men, men who would not stoop to
any political deal such as it was charged
was ured to get Dr. Thomas' goat
"The Schoolmasters' club would not
pull off a deal of that kind," shouted
Mr. King. "I have belonged to the club
ten years and any roan who Insinuates
that the club would enter Into any
political xleal or that its membership
j would work any poltlcal trick to get
tOvntlnued en Pace Three.
Appear Before Grand
Judy This Afternoon
NEW YOllK, Oct. M.-Oharles K.
Murphy, leader of Tammany hall, was
among the witnesses cited to appear at
the so-called John Doe proceedings Into
the oharges of corruption against Tam
many, made by John A. Hennessy In re
cent speeches In behalf of the fusion
ticket In the mayoralty campaign. The
hearing set for late this afternoon be
fore Chtof Magistrate McAdoo conoernn
mainly allegation as to oontributlpns.
"Every person wnos name has been
m)4oped V Mr; Hwnny,''ald Uu
district attorney today, "Is likely to be
called. Mr. Henneasys little bfacK book
will also be put In evidence. The Inves
tigation Will be thorough."
I!ehnessyr it Ik Understood, has given
the district attorney a list of about titty
names. Amoiig them. It was said, were
those of Arthur A. McLean, treasurer of
the democratlo state committee and a
prominent New York hotel keeper. They
will be asked about contributions which
Hennessy rays were made for cnnna'm
purposes, but never officially reported.
A statement was expected late today
from Stephen J. Stllwell, the convict
state senator In Sing Sing, excerpts from
whole alleged confession have been
bandied about during tho campaign. In
a statement Issued late last night he
said he had never made charges against
Murphy and he added that they would
Issue a sworn siatemont an to Just what
occurred when ho held conference with
Hennessy and others. "I have no con
fession to make Involving any man or
men In publlo office, ' he Insisted.
Suffragist Given
Place on Federal
Industrial Board
WASHINGTON, Oct. M. -Women In
governmental affairs score'd another
victory today when Mrs. Crystal East
man Benedict, a leading tuff run 1st of
Wisconsin and New York, was added to
the staff of the new federal Industrial
commission, which Is about to take up a
study of the causes for unrest In the
United States. Mrs. llencdlr.t Has en
gaged bedauso of her knowledge of tho
legal side of industrial disputes. Mis
J, Borden Harriman of New York, the
only woman member of th oommlvslon,
had announaed her Intention of glvlm;
up her other residence and living In
Washington during the winter in order
to be in close touch with the work. She
has been appointed by Chairman Frank
Walsh to act in his plarc as resident
commissioner whenevsr ho Is compelled
to be absent-
Witness in White
Slave Case at Butte,
Mont,, is Murdered
SPOKANE. Wash.. Oct 21. Mrs. Grace
ilieaV who was the government's chief
witness In the prosecution of Max Fried
on white slavery charges at Tlutte, Mont.,
died In a hospital here today from pistol
wounds inflicted last night, she said by
M. A. Pevon. while she was in a room
In a hotel at JHureka, Mont Before being
put on tho train for Spokane, she Is said
to have Identified Devon.
A sister of the woman said Mrs. Beat
had written her that since she testified
ugainst Fried, who was convicted, she
hod received threatening letters.
Devon is under arrest at Eureka.
The, National Capital
Saturday, November 1, 1111:1.
Thr Srnalr.
Not in session; meets Monday.
Banking committee met in executive
session.
The House.
Met at noon.
Consideration of a resolution In sympa
thy with Winston Churchill's naval holi
day program was postponed.
Adjourned at I a to noon. Saturday.
GRAND ISLAND CELEBRATES
Monument Unveiled to Soldiers
Which Barton Speaks.
at
HIGHWAY DEMONSTRATION ALSO
City Ablnso with lied Tire tn fllve
Impetus to IlallftlnB- of Great
IIIahTrny Across tho Con
tinent. Oft AND ISLAND, Neb., Oct 31.-(Bpe-cial.)
In a Joint celebration today and
tonight the location of the Lincoln Na
tional highway was dedicated 'and a tine
rooriunwnt to the 'country's old!rs was
unvfiUed- "
, The automobile parade formed at the
Pioneer iquuro and took a wide . sweep
over tho business and residence sections
of the city, The Grand Army of the Re
public. Woman's Belief corps. Spanish
American soldiers and school children and
students participated In a foot parade at
the samA hour, both Joining at 3:30 at
the court house square, where approprl
ate oxerclses were held.
After an Invocation by Ttev. L. A, Ar
thur, Mayor Ryan delivered a short In
troductory address, after which the large
15.000 monument erected on tho court
house square was unveiled, Miss Evelrn
Ilyali releasing tho veil anil revealing the
gray granite and heavy coppor emblem
of the heroism of the days or to .
A response to Mayor Ryan's address
was made by Colonel J. S. Hoagland of
North Platte. At tre muslo by the school
children there was another address of
congratulation by Captain 3, 'K. Dempster,
commander of the Grand Army of tho Be
public, Department of Nebraska.
Congressman Barton, who left Wash
ington for the first time since taking his
seat in March, was then Introduced as
the speaker of the day with reference
to the unvelUng, and paid a splendid
tribute to the men' and women of tho
civil war period who preserved the union
of states at such a Kfeat price. A glow
ing tribute was also paid to tho pioneer
settlers who blazed the trails to the west
In order that there might be established
more homes, the Integral units of the na
tion, wherein man was the secretary of
foreign affairs and woman the secretary
of tho Interior, relgnjng. supreme through
her gentleness.
After an eloquent sketch pt Abraham
Lincoln, the congressman closed with a
quotation from "The Ship of State."
President F. W. Aehton of the Commer
cial club followed with an address on the
Lincoln lUghway. Mr. Ashtoti was dele
gated by the local club to attend the
meeting at Detroit at which the line of
the highway was fixed and explained In
brief the alms and purposes of the or
ganization and what was expected by this
association of the several states and com
munities through which It iassed.
."America" was sung by the audience,
followed by benediction by Kev. Mr, Ab
bott and "taps" by Bugler Boehm, Com
pany M, Second Nebraska, Spanish
American war,
Tonight the city wr ablaze In red, In
further celebration of the highway, the
Union Poclflo having kindly contributed
a generous supply.' of .fuses for Lh ovn
; . . .. ,r- . ..
inieaa or me iet 'attractive and more
dangerous bonfires. Ttfese wero stationed '
along tho curblngs of the principal streets
and inad a brilliant illumination.
The city's new electrolier system was
also turned on for the first time.
Man and Woman
Overcome by Gas
NEW YORK, Oct .-Florence HallL
ar. a governess In the family of Maurice
Brill, a prominent clothing merchant,
waa.found dead, and a man supposed to
have been her fiance was found uncon.
solous 1n a rooming house where the
young woman lived, Iste last night, from
what 'Is supposed to havo been the ac
cidental escape, pf gas. It was under
stood at the house that the couple were
engaged to be married shortly. Both
ware clsd for the street as though about
to leave the house where they were
overcome by the gas escaping from a
stove. The man. known only at the
house as a Mr. Price, was taken to the
JTlowtr hospital In a critical condition.
FIRES BLAZE ALONG
ROUTE OF LINCOLN
MEMORIAL HIGHWAY
Dedicatory Ceremonies Upon Grand
Scale Held in Omaha and Great
Enthusiasm Prerails.
HUGE BONHRE IS LIGHTED
Oil
and Kindling Wood Send tho
Flames Toward the Sky.
STREETS GAILY DECORATED
Profusion of Flags and Bunting-Flut
ter in Night Breezes.
MANY SPEECHES DELIVERED
Shrill Blasts from Innumerable
Whistles Announce tlint Ocran-to-Ocenn
Itoml Is nn Kstab-
llelird Fnct.
Eight wagon loadc of ties were piled
around four barrels of tar and four
wagon loads of boxes, kindling wood and
dry branches on the site of the new
Fontenello hotel yesterday and at 8
o'clock Inst night II. D. Fredrlokson
touched a match to the huge pile in dedi
cation of the Lincoln Memorial highway.
Just beforo the match was pplled to the
dry timber four barrels of highly In
flammable oil was poured over the
high pier, In order to assure a blase
which was dlsccrnable In almost any
part of thn city.
Six men worked all morning on the pile
of timber only to have Flro Chief Salter
condemn the proceedings and order the
removal of the pllo to the center of the
lot The first location was but fifty feet
from the Cnthollo church, and Chief
Salter feared the Intense heat from the
blazn would break tho windows In thn
church. Chief Baiter also allayed tho
fears of surrounding property owners by
announcing that he would havo a hose
cart 011 the scene and would attach n
hose' to the hydrant at Eighteenth and
Douglua streets- As soon as the festivi
ties were over tho tiro department ex
tinguished the blaze.
The big demonstration aroused the
enthusiasm of tho entire city. II. E. Fred
rlckson, state counsel for the highway as
sociation, was kept busy all morning
answering Inquiries over the telephone re
garding tho celebration.
All the principal stores and buildings
In Qmaha were decorated for tho occa
sion, From )he flag pole on top pt the'
Woodmen of the World building and
City National bank building were firiiiR
flags beating the colors of tho asser
tion. Most of the stores along Farftam
Street were decorated. The Bee build
ing flung American flags from every
window facing Farnam street. The wel
come arch was dtcorated with American
flags and red, white and blue bunting,
At precisely J:li o'clock last night every
whistle In Omaha announced tho
commencement of the celebration with
shrill blasts. At 630 o'clock Mayor Dahl
man opened the, festivities with a shot
talk, followed by speeches from Commis
sioner Jack Ryder, W. D. Hosford and
Homo Miller. All tho addresse were short
and no lengthy talks wore tolerated.
Speaking was from automobllea
NEBRASKA TOWNS CELEBRATE
Speclnl
Eaerelses Held at
Along the Route.
Points
LINCOLN, Neb., Oct 31. All along the
route of tho Lincoln highway through
Nebraska, towns and villages are celebat
ing the opening of the road today. In
many towns, fireworks and parades
marked the occasion. At Fremont special
school programs wore held, with those
men who havo backed tho project In this
state, speaking to the school children.
CHEYENNE. Wyo., Oct. 31,-Cltles and
towns throughout Wyomlag-Jtere prepar
ing today to celebrate this evening the
designation of tho Lincoln Memorial
highway route through the southern por
tion of the state.
Retailers Want
y i
Quick Selling
Merchandise
The retail merchants who
read this newspaper ars ask
ed Ujls question:
Wbal kind of merchandise
Is the most profitable?
The question Is simple and
the reply seems equally so:
The most profitable merchan
dise la in the main that which
is In greatest demand by tho
people. That Is to say, mer
chandise of knotm quality and
reliability offered at a fair
and reasonable price.
The profit may not be In all
ca6C8 equal to that which a
merchant may sometimes ex
act frim nondescript merchan
dise, but the volume of sales
Is much greater; soles are
made more quickly; stocks
turned more often; and satis
fied customers increase In num
ber. Wise merchants, not only
here, but throughout the land,
are turning to the known
brands of merchandise that are
In demand. Through tho ad
vertising columns of The Bee
and other good newspapers the
public Is being educated to de
mand what they -want, and
they go whore they can get it.
Result: Time and moey
saved for retailer and con
sumer with increased satlsfac
tlon for both.
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