Omaha daily bee. (Omaha [Neb.]) 187?-1922, September 02, 1912, Page 9, Image 9

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    THE BEE: OMAHA, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1912.
9
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The
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SILK HAT HARRY'S DIVORCE SUIT Jud8e Rumhauser EL?nIJJ,ove stunts in Court j)rawn for The Bee by Tad
1 -TrPeR-i AJ A
VNlTNEiX TOD"
CfellTMV LETTU
Hunting a Husband
The Widow Makes a Terrible Discovery, Which is Eased,
However, by an Unepected Incident.
By VIRGINIA TERHCNE VAN DEWATER.
wl... .waIta h mnmlncr aftAr I TViapa wis a mlf bblnr that tnrtA and
Sidney Randolph's farewell visit, her I the boy stopped, startled, glanced at his
.. . 1 . L .l I - .i A J kl II,. AMAmKl&i
ImUlUCI BI1U 1119 lip UCU1UICU.
rWV!" in!m1 Beatrice, sternly.
CUO iiaU VI 1 GU .v "-'I- I - -
i i ,.nni nr anrrnnr hilt tia avaai flnaTiirc "I'm nnhamed of Toll!
in Wf Ki'lllg VI UOIHHWCUl v. w.v-f I W o- '
with the stormy sobbing oi mortification I never told you that! You behaved dls-
and of thwarted ambitions, sne was nun graceiuuy, ana ji am very aneiy wvu
and ashamed and a little disgusted with you." . .
tha ThA rhlM wnfi in tears now. "But.
nerseii u pud wircu - . .
Uhw k.,. nhrvva nil othr sensations mother." he sobbed, "you did say"
1 i. o. lm1an If I "V mntlur!" IntAmintpd .Tlan. Whlm-
Iiamea a iierce reowuiuiout, o , .
lieu m fciatQ cm v.ihivj.i.( - - , ' -
was unreasoning, against the artist I pering In sympathy with her brother.
It
who. she felt, had humiliated her.
Twelve hours ago she had been will
ing to bestow her hand In marriage on
the man who, she thought, loved her, giv
me man wuu, w ""i ' , - - -
Ing him a Ught and facile admlraUon and you, until you can behave yourselves!
.... I m .(.iMhh AWail Vitn cr in rnn
X 1IB VU1IULCU VUClli
. ... l i AH KfH alnror f.
ilKing mm in iciujii iui - . - - .
tectlon and for the ease and luxury which cert Left alone, Beatrice sat. her head
life with him would bring to her. And In her hands, and tried to think con-
the artist had not asked her to marry nectedly. What would a rumor of this
hlm' There lay his offense. To be sure, kind mean if Maynard repeated it? Sup-
lie had never talked love to her. had never pose it cama to Randolph's
declared that his feeling toward her was writhed as she went over the possibilities
any deeper than frank friendship" and attendant upon her son's exposure of her
auj fn. hnnoa and clans. Everybody
nienmim in her companionship.
Had Beatrice Minor been cooler ana
Had Beatrice Minor ueen tuurei , -- -
iore judicial, .be might hare seen even thought long and hard her hands pressa
JllVlO umiv.-., 1 . . tatyinUo kt last fih lYlUft With A
rnow that what she bad mistaken for love
'"on RandolpRVpattThiSa BEetr ms cauniy
continental manner, and his foreign liabit
of paying pretty compliments. But she
.was not calm or quit sane this morning,
jknd in her Heart she despised the man as
one only despises the person who, wit
tingly or unwittingly, puts oneilrreparably
- In the wrong, and makes ono ashamed of
one's self. Rejected love may change to
hatebt hurt vanity ferment- into a
more bitter and less dignified emotion.
As' Beatrice stood before her dressing
table, her eyes fell upon the ancient
-bracelet which lay there, and she took it
Into her fingers that she might examine
It more closely.1 But in a flash the mem
ory of her eager anticipation of a dif
ferent gift from Randolph sickened her,
and, with a muttered exclamation of dis
gust, she threw th" beautiful trinket upon
the table, from whjjch. it rolled to -the
floor, where it'.lay unnoticed .until Mary
' coming in laterto make the bed jrtcked
it up ad laid it carefully 'in her mis-
tress' jewelqrbox.;' .' ...s v.
1 Beatrice, dressed slowly and -listlessly
.. this morning, and when her toilette was
' completed," . .'troUed' into: the breakfast
room, where the children were already
awaiting her.
"What's the matter mother?" asked
Jack as the woman with a wan smile of
greeting, seated herself at the table.
"I've a little headache that's all," an
swered Beatrice.- .' '
"You've been crying," accused Jean.
"Does it hurt so much?"
1 "A good deal," replied her mother.
And then, to change the subject, she re
marked; "Lucy Horton. had a nice party
last night, didn't she?" . ;
"Yep!" responded Jack, deep in his
; porridge. "Mr. and Mrs. Horton were
there, too, and Mi. Maynard and Miss
Damerel, and, of course, lots of kids too."
; "Did you have a good time?" asked
"Beatrice. ' . v;..
"Yes, mother," answered Jean. "And
don't you think Miss Damerel's awful
pretty and nice, too?" ' ;
"She's very nice," agreed Beatrice. She
found it hard this morning to admit
that .there was any beauty in the face
of the girt whom she had first met at
Sidney Randolph's studio.
TJvere was a moment's silence, which
Beatrice broke by the question:
"Did either of you children speak 'to
Mr. Maynard?" j
"Yes." declared Jack, Importantly, "I
did. "We had quite a long talk together
'him and me. He asked about you, mother,
and I said that you were well, and that
'you were going to get Mr. Randolph for
your new husband and that I wished
it was him."
"Jack!", gasped Beatrice, horrified.
"Yes'm, I did!" continued the lad Un
observant of his mother's pale face and
tnse figure. He held the center of the
stage and was full of excitement at the
Joy of imparting information. "And Mr.
Maynard asked me how I knew, and I
said you 'told me."
' "Jack!" repeated his mother, '
tn bar tAmnlaa. At last She rose with a
I-sigh-and went search .pf: her., unhappy
children. V' . ,
"Jak," she said gentry, but firmly, as
the boy reased his tear-stanned eyes to
hers, "the thing that made me angry
with you was your telling what was not
true."
"But, mother," sniveled the illd, "it
was only what you told me."
. "No," reproved Beatrice, "I did not tell
you that"
"But wasn't that what you, meant?"
persisted Jack, "and you didn't say not
to tell." ,
y '.' His Assets
Georgia Lawyer (to colored . prisoner)
Well, Ras, so you want me to defend
you. Have you any money?
Eastus No; but I'se got a mule, and
a few chickens and a hog or two.
' f Lawyer Those ' will do very nicely.
Now, let's see; what do they t accuse you
: of stealing? ,
, Rastus Oh, a mule, and affew chlck
' tns and a bos or two, Ufa. ,
'Vou said you were going to have a
new"
"That's enough!" burst forth the widow
wrathfully. "Leave the table, both of
futile hopes and plans. Everybody
seemed in league against her today. She
AND TltUP L rtiB ' I
CCIiTLCMCN Be -SEATED
TAMBo Dt WA1TAH5 PROW
DESUMMAH HOTClr WENT
OUT &AIUM ON te Ri VAH .
YESTERDAY
JNTERLOOUTOT? 5 THAT SO.
DjO Thy have a nice Time
TAriBO-YES ONUY DAT A
SUDDeN &QVAL.L. CAMC OP
AND CAPSI2ED DE BOAT fiirr
XY WAS ALU&AVCO DAT
just 6Hows xe rosce or
HA&T ANYWAY
INTERLOCUTOR- HOW DOES IT
SHOW THE FORCE OP HABlT
TAHBO- WHY BVfcM DC WIND
TlPPtl) W WAITAHS
LEAVE THAT WOMAN BE!!
HALT!'
THtY WERF WAITING AT THE
CHURCH THfi tRiJC VVA9
TkeRB AND THE CRaWD WA
there But the BRideroo
WHEKE WAS HE ? THCY WAITED
AND WAITED AND THEN TO
RELIEVE THE EMBARRaSMENT
OT THE SITUATION. THEY
WAITED FlNAlLf A MES5Eff
6ER BOY CAME VP THE Ar5U
AND HANDED THE MlNtSTEf
A N9TS.THE REERSND
OPENED IT AHD READ OUT
"IF THE PIANO TOLD THE
TRUTH WOULD IT DC
UPRIGHT
H a! w a! he chucicled
ASHl5GLf5S EYE
FELL INTO THE CHOWDER.
HALT.1 WHO
GOES THR
FIRST CLASS in
NATURAL HISTORY WAS
UP FOR RECITATION. THE
TEACHER HAB READ THE,
CASCOF A MAN BClNfr
IMPAUED ON THfl HORNS
Of A DJLEMMA.THSTN HE
ASiKED LITTLE. "JOHN fit
IN WHAT PART OP TWE WO ROM
THE DILEMMA WAS TO BC
POUND AND HOWi.0N
WSSS ITS MORNS. LITTLE?
Johnny Shifted and tuck
side stepped tmf main
ISSUE DYAtRjN
-lit Jl RUNNER DROVEE HS
APlKcrfi INTO THS FIRST -I
SACK WOULD TH CAi-aALJ
KIS5 ME KlDJI ,'m
STERILlXEDjj
AT THIS HO VR
OPTHENlfrMT
Mpl IT SEEMS STBrTNtfE
, MHAT A MAN) 5J0'JLT
ryw. Abour
7"
AND
WW ARCH
Vou
r
4.
The Heavens in September
THAT?UT
THE fWSH
IN Hlk
"Even If I meant it .dear," said the
mother, "you shouldn't havo told it.
Gentlemen don't repeat to other men
things women have told them."
- "Yes'm," gulped the lad. "I'm sorry,
mother; honest. I am!" ,
After restoring peace In the nursery
Beatrice crept, shaken and wearied, to
her own room and bilrled her aching head
In her pillow. She was sick of all this
scheming, this sham, this subterfuge.
She was still, reviling herself tor her
recent conduct when Mary entered, bring
Ing a letter, snd at a glance the widow
recognised "Uncle Henry's" scrawl. As
soon ss her maid had left the room the
woman tore open the envelope and
eagerly devoured the contents. Her head
swam as she read:
My Dear Friend I have desired for a
long time to ask you a question which I
can write better than I can speak. It Is
this: Will you marry me. I love you. 1
don't need to tell you that, (or you must
have seen It already. I have enough
means to support you and your Tlttls one
In ease and luxury.
Don't be too quick In answering this.
Think It over carefully, snd then write
me your answer, , Whatever It may be, I
shall always remain, devotedly yours.
. ;, HENRY BLANCHARD.
Beatrice read . the letter twioe. Then
she sprang to her feet, and a light as of
hope came IhtyJ her eyes which, but a few
minutes ago; had been so heavy. Her
headache was forgotten and the hurt to
her vanity was almost healed.'
Autumn begins on the 134 at 4:0 a. m.
when the sun crosses the equator and
enters ths sign of Libra, Day and night
are equal that flay alt over the world.
The sun would then rise at a. m. and
set st p. m. exactly, according to what
la called local apparent time, that la,
the time shown by a sun dial, wm It not
that the rising It accelerated and the set
ting retarded three minutes by refrac
tion. A rlock would need a further csr
reotlon of seven and ' one-half ' minutes
because the sun Is that much slow on the
2Sd. It Is slow the whole month, from
a few seconds on the lt to ten min
utes on the SMh. According to standard
time the sua rises at I a. m. on the
10th and sets at 6 p. m. on October 1
It rises on the 1st, 15th and JOth of this
month at t;61, g:6 and 6:M, and seta at
;67, 6:S4 and t.Qt. making the length of
the day thirteen hours, six minutes:
twelve hours, twenty-nlns minutes:
eleven hours, forty-nine minutes; : a
diminution of one hour, seventeen min
utes during the month.
Mercury Is morning star and farthest
away, that Is. 18 degrees from the sun
on the 7th. This Is the best time of the
whole year to see this planet before sun
rise. Venus Is slowly receding fom the sun.
A keen eye ought to find It very easily
)ow down in tha west after sunset.
Mara is too near the sun to be seen. It
makes a close conjunction with Venus on
the Sth, for which, however, a telescope
will 'be necessary.
.Jupiter Is still the dominant planet In
the evening sky. It sets, on the 15th at
:6i p. m. '
Saturn is coming Into bettar position.
It rises on tho IWh at.Jitt p. nv '
The moon Is In last quarter on ths
th, new on the 10th, in first quarter
on the 18th and full on the 26th. " H is In
conjunction with Saturn on the Sd. with
Mercury on the 9th, with Mars and
The Sirens
By Nell Brinkley
V"
Copyright, 1912, . National News Ass'n.
T :
THS PARTIAL KCL1PSF. OK THK
MOON ON SEPTEMBER M.
Ths circle represents the full moon
with Its cardinal points, the point T be
Ins the top. The moon will begin to be
obscured at the point C at fr:0J a, m. At
5:43 the ecllpas will reach Its maximum.
and present tho shape shown in the
diagram.
Venus on the 12th and with Jupiter on
the lth.
The chief event o! the month is a
very small ecllpxe of the moon on the
morning of the Kth. Tho moon will b- f
gin to enter th earth's shadow at B:W 1
a. m. At B:4S it will reach Its greatest
ubsouration, only 12 per cent of Its dta
meter being eclipsed. Tha moon, will
leave the shadow at 6:26, but will have
already let for Omaha at 6:1a As the
sun will rise at 6:16 ths eclipse may
pass altogether unnoticed. , ' 1
wiluam f. Riaaic
Little Bobbie's Pa
By WILLIAM F. KIRK.
Pa calm hoam last nits V toald Ma
that he was at a meeting of tha Cltlsens
to reeform the condlshuns that was ex
isting In New York. Ha sed that ths
meeting wlch he bad attended was at
Cooper Union. Down with the slstem.
sed Pa, when he calm Into ths house.
Let me understand you correckly, led
Ma, Bobble, pretend that you are a court
reeporter. Get a Piece of paper It pencil
A talk down yure father's testimony. , It
must be took down correck, sed Ma, bee
kaus the grand Jury may need It later on.
What grand jury, sed Pa. Me, sad Ma,
I am the grand jury.
Well, sed' Pa, the facks In the case are
these: Early In tha eevnlng I was on my
way up town to play a galm of pinokel
with two honest, thrifty, German friends
of mine, ft along calm Mister Whitman.
Mister Whitman was plainly tired out,
sed Pa. Any time you find a big leaguer
like him, sed Pa, with enuif bravery to
buck the n-tira poleece department, yoo
will find a man that Is high strung. His
face was pale A cars worn, sed Pa. My
heart went out to him.
It did? sed Ma.
' Yes, td Pa, it did. I am not ths kind
of a man that will stand idly by 4b seo a
reel hero wanting for a lutenant Bo I
sed to Mister Whitman, sed I, Mister
Whitman, feel of the mussels of this arm.
Look into my quickly shitting eye. Do
you want me for a aids?
Then Pa went'on to tell Ma how Mister
Whitman ln-slsted on his going to the
Cooper Union meeting, A how ho had
made a speech at the meeting.
Ma beegan to look at Pa kind of hard.
It Is singular, she sed, that I dldent seo
a singel account of yure De-mosthe-nees
effort In any of the patper. What do I
care about the palptrs? sed Pa. Me &
Mister Gaynor has the doap about the
patpers, sed Pa. The editors Is a Jot of
rabbel. Nobody ought to dine with them.
They eat too much.
Now, husband; sed Ma, I am going to
bring this thing to a head. In the first
place, Ma sed, you were not at Cooper
Union. Tou are at the end of yure rope
the mlnint you start to stall with me,
sed Ma. Then Ma grabbed a rose out of
Pa's buttonhole & held it up for me to
see It, & sed: "
: Bobble, what does it say on the stem
of this rose?
I hated to tell en Pe. beekaus I got a
other quarter from him yesterday, but
my Ma Is prltty close to me, too, so I
sed it says Compliments of the Winter
Garden & Mister Oreneker.
I doant know how that got In my but
ton bole, sed Pa. ' "
Yes you do, sed Ma, that rose was
thrown to ypu by a gurL You know as
well as I do, aed Ma, that one of them
butiful flftow gurls threw that rose to
you wen, thay was, passing along ths
foot brMge. I will say one thing for yotf,
ed Ma, you are as grate a catcher as
Chief Myers, beekaus the gurl after she
had looked at you must have tried to
throw It three feet oaver yure head.
Poor old Pa. He can't malk bis wift
beleeve nothing. .f j ' . .
f