Omaha daily bee. (Omaha [Neb.]) 187?-1922, May 27, 1912, Image 1

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    Daily Bee
Looking Backward
Thia Day in Omaha
TEX wTATHEB.
Showers; Cooler
VOL. XU NO. . 295.
OMAHA, MONDAY MORNING, MAY 27, 1912-TEN PAGES.
SINGLE COPY TWO CENTS.
Omaha;
WARSHIPS LEAVE
ON HDRRY ORDERS
, Earibip of Atlantic Cleet an-t Four
f Battleships Bettered Haded
for Key West.
BIO DELAWARE TAXIS 05 TON
Spends Iky Filling Bunkers tad
Field Equipment
EOSFITAI SUP WILL SAIL
Solace Bettered to Hare Orders to
Go Dunns; Bight
OTBXB VESSELS TO JOU FLEET
lilarulln at Sew York to that
Wkn Shta Reach Haptens Roade
They Will Be Joined by Tkn ,
Km BatUcehla.
NEW YORK. Mar M.-The armored
crulaer Washington, flagship of Rar Ad
aural Huso Oatarhaua, commander-lo
ch iff at tha Atlantic fleet, and four bat
tleahlpa of tha fourth division ailed
seuta. supposedly lor key west, an burry
onlara today a few hour after arrival
la port from Provlncetowa, Mass. Tha
battleships following tha flagship war
tha Ohio, Missouri. Miaaiaalppl and Minne
sota-
Tha gunboat Yankton accompanied tha
equadroa to eerve aa a dispatch boat. Tha
battleship Delaware of the first division
remained in port all day taklnc aboard
Its ootnplement of mart nee and field
equipment, and together .with tha hospital
ahlp Solace we expected to sail d urine
Ah night. . .
T The flax ship Washington and tha bate
' tleahlpa dropped anchor off the naval
station at Tompkins Title, 8. I., shortly
after dawn today, where they are be
lieved to have received new orders, for
at about M o'clock residents of the Island
heard the rattle of the (rest warships'
anchor chains stain and In half an hour
the last of the five vessels Jjad passsd
out to sea. It Is understood that the
battleships have on board several hun-
JmJ m.4n mint tk.t . II-.. ......
reach Hampton Roads the battleships
Georgia. New Jersey and Rhode Island
of the third division will be ready to Join
them oa the trip south.
Imp
ortant Decision
in Trial of Darrow
to Be Made Monday
LOS ANGELES. May MFlghtlng
every Inch of the way, the defense In the
case of Clarence 8. Darrow, temporarily
at least, stopped at today's brief session
of the Darrow trial the narration .of
3eorge Jf. Leckwood of the attempted
bribery of fclnweM by Bert H. Preaklla.
The ruling of Jujg Mutton at l:S
o'clock Monday afternoon, to Which time
adjournment was taken shortly-' before
noon today, 'will determine whether avt
lenoe of alleged wholesale Jury corruption
ball constitute part of the state's case
against Darrow. k ,' ' "
.Both aid admitted that a crisis had
been reached In ta ease of the noted
awyer. ,- .., ; : .1
A ruling against the' admissibility of
evidence showing alleged offenses other
than the attempted corruption of-fcock-wood
would be a serious setback to the
prosecution and aa important victory for
Jie .defense.
With the exclusion of the evidence In
volved la the question the state a case
would be confined to testimony germane
only to the Lockwood testimony, which
would hasten the end of the trial by at
. least a month. .
'There will be no such denouement aa
mded the McNamara trial in that' of
Clarence 8. Darrow for Jury bribing, ac
cording to District Attorney Fredericks
today. Reporta to the effect that Darrow
bad offered to confess and plead guilty
rare characterised by Darrow as "lies."
"I never had anything to confess la this
case,' said Darrow today, -"and never
had any conversation with anyone regard
ing a confession, nor any intimation or
thought of that kind."
Fredericks refused to state definitely
whether the prosecution conducted any
negotiations with the detenae, looking to
a plek of guilty. He said, however, that ha
expected the trial of Darrow to continue
an 01 the Jury agreed ea a verdict.
Sudden Flood Causes
"; Loss Near Yankton
SUTTON. Neb, May SS-Speeal Tele
gram.) Reuben Antbes 'and hia sister
Delia will start tomorrow for aa over
land "hike" to California, where they
expert to make their home. The total
trip will be approximately UM miles and
they expect to) travel ut the rate of
thirty mike par day. Mlaa Anthee hopes
to break the record for long distance
walking for women. The route to be
followed la Iron Sutton ta Cheyenne, to
Ogden and direct to Ban Francisco. They
will carry with them nothing but ' a
camera and will depend entirely on the
country through which they peas, except
ing wast can be packed la a suitcase,
which they will ex prate ahead and expect
to meet once a week.. The Ladies' Walk
ing dub. of which Miss Anthee Is a mem
ber; will accompany them as far aa
Harvard -toluol low awning. .
NEW RAILWAY MAIL CLERKS
NAMED FM THREE STATES
WASHINGTON, May -H Specie! Tele,
gram.) The following railway mall clerks
have been appelated in Nebraska:
. E. & Dooglaa. ant norland: Oscar J.
Bates. Betharm A. J. Sciesm. Table
Rock; D. Ok. WhMehora. University Place:
W. J. BMatekar. Brady: C. D. Marble,
Breeham: B. L Mitchell, University
Pease: Claade I Karrever, Means City:
Carl. Sf. Ttiaaipaoa, Cetlege. vice Frank
Sa. OeHLtllantnB, aaarCUaVaHB '
leera: U A- BHekeUe. Burlington; U
ft. Dennis. ReaVting: Rex aV Burner. Iowa
City; L Stewart, Floyd: C. C. Oxley.
Sfartea.
Wywmtag: Bab art A. Wood and Robert
iJfsaes. Sawrtaaa, Pava- a- Haeasa,
Commencements in
Nebraska High and
Grade Schools
ALLIANCE. Nek, May A (Special V
Tha ccantr enoeaoeat ex arna as of the
AiBai.ee High ecboot, held In the opera
house Wednesday evening, had aa attend
ance taxing tne h wan to capacity. A
Cbvs of win st 1 sa graduates eeoupted the
stage, with the numbers of the school
board, and war presented with diplomas
by D. W. Bug-bee. secretary of the board.
After the Invocation by Bar. a A.
Wilts, and a 'musical program by tha
members of the class. Superintendent
Pate of the city schools introduced
Governor A id rich, who spoke for nearly
aa hour. .
Mr. Aidrlch said la part: "My
or thia evening may properly be termed
"the philosophy of education.' He spoke
with masterly eloquence on the various
phases of the eurriculums of our present
day system of ed neat ion and brought
out the salient points of the great ora
tlod of Demosthenes upon the crown In
such a way that all were compelled to be
impressed with the . Importance of the
c rani cat auhjecte, which are taught, and
which many people consider to be
perfluou. He concluded . by forcibly
bringing this point to the attention of
his audience that "The only object of an
education is to develop a capacity tor
thought, to the and that certain fixed
mental processes become the natural
order of the mind la act of civic vurtue
Land the broad spirit of altruism, which Is
absolute unaelflshneaa.'
WEEPING WATER, Neb.. May St
(Speclal.V-Tha graduates of the eighth
grade schools of Caaa county that had
pa seed tha examination met here Satur
day to receive their diplomas. There
were 177, or twenty more than one year
ago. County Buparvatondent Mary A
roster gave them a talk prior to handing
out 'the diplomas. In the morning
ciphering and spelling contest was bald
and in tha former- Miss Alma Hall of
Plattsmouth was winner, -In the latter
Mies Eva Sehllchtemeler of district No.
IS, Nahawka, waa winner and Mlaa Mar-
cell Lowe second.
WACO, Neb.. May M.-Rpaotal--Or.nv
mencement exercises of the high school
were held Friday evening. Misses Ketea
born and Brown and Roy Leuthje and
Cecil Thorps completing the high school
work.
BURWELL, Neb., May H (Special.)
The baccalaureate sermon to the Burwell
High school class waa preached by Rev.
H.K. Mills at the Methodist Episcopal
church Sunday and the regular gradu
ating exercises were held Wednesday
evening and the elaas puty waa given oa
Friday evening. The graduates are:
Clarence Thurston, Mabel Hallock, Esther
De Lashmutt and Mabel Green.
GREELEY. Neb.. May .- Special.)
Commencement exercise of the Greeley
schools were held at the opera bouse Fri
day night before a gathering of K
patrons of tha school. The elaas of Kit
consuls of seven young women: Eva
McBeth. Ueorglna Talbert, Florence M
Harra.ilU. Nellie Gray. Ella Cannon.
Marguerite Doyle and Mercury Sutton.
Each gavs a brief address and the pro
gram waa Interspersed with vocal and
Instrumental music.
Deny Madero Asked
to Kesign His nace
CHIHUAHUA. Max.. May SS.-That con.
grass had requested Madera to resign the
presidency and that ha bad agreed to dJ
so June 1 was the substance of a tele
gram received at the rebel army head
quarter today.
The name of the sender of the message
was not made public, though It was ad
mitted that It came from a peraoa Je
Mexico City.
With the mountain passe Just north of
Bachtinbe, forty miles south of here, as
their objective, the thousands of rebels
who Thursday ceased the struggle to hold
Rellano against the heavy fire of Gen
eral Huertaa federal troops, today are
scattered along the route from the south.
MEXICO CITY, May'M-The reported
Intention of Madero to resign waa branded
tonight by members of the president's
family as too ridiculous to merit serious
denial. Oustavo Madero, the president's
brother, said, that no such thing waa even
thought of.
MAZATLAN. May nV-Among the
refuges oa board the United States trans
port Buford, which arrived here today,
are nicmbera of a religious colony of
forty from ths Isthmus of Tehauntepec.
who reached the transport after an ex
haustive trip.
Among the refugee were Mr. and Mr
Thomas, IS and 17 years eld, respectively,
who two year ago came from Dee
Moines, la., and started a banana and
pineapple plantation, which waa destroyed
by brigands.
The Buford sailed at S a. m. today and
due to reach Baa Diego early Wedneo
day. Refugees from the extreme south
report a strong anti-American feeling to
prevalent.
HITCHCOCK ASKS STATISTICS
ON FIVE LARGE INDUSTRIES
WASHrXOTO!r. May K.-A resolution
designed to lay bar the capitalisation,
earnings, etc, in. the Iron, etaeL sugar,
cotton and wool Industries of the United
State mas Introduced by - Senafor
Hitchcock of Nebraaka. It calls oa ths
president for. a ajmy'lailoa of statistics
In these lines.'
Mr.. Hitchcock said the return mad
te the federal government under tb cor
poration tax law wcuid anew enormous
proflta There was some dlevusatoo la
the senate as to tha propriety of making
the laformuica public.
The reao'.ution aeat over for' further
conslderatieB.
ConMnlealoner Cabell of the bureau of
internal revacoe. It at said, baa complete
Information regarding the bustneas of
every corporation la the country. This
in forma tioa had bean procured to deter
mine the taxable earning auder the taxa
tion law and could not be pabllahed ex
cept by cuiiiislual authority.
UNION. Neb, May JA - .-"portal Tete
araia.) The cornnaenoecnant exerctosa of
tha Union achaoh) were held la Woodman
ban last sight Jodjre A Hen J. Beeaoa
of Plattsoeuth delivered the address to
the caaa the graduates being Mlaa Ruth
Chenowetb. Mlaa Mary Backer and Mr.
Vane Harria - v -
Tne presentation af diplnaua waa made
by C L. Grave, a bat af the board.
Praf. A, P.
JERSEY EIGHT
NEARSITS END
Iresideiit Taft ax Colonel Roote-
rtlt BoxniBf Up Roads lead'
inr to Gotham.
TJOSI STXEHTTOOS v"
Conunutj,. . Covered by
X -acnti-e.
colo:
o nr facto
FACTORY BBTEICT
Both 8ides Confident of Winning in
the Voting.
STATE ISSUES USED BY WILSOI
Oraaaerata, ''alike Btepablleaae, As
Ctahtlac Oat Their Difference
Wlthea BeeawtlaaT te National
. Qaeatlema.
NEWORK. N. J, May Se,-Prealdant
Taft. Ex-President Roosevelt and Senator
La Feltette rested today after three day
of the hardest campaigning they have ex
perienced since they began the tight for
the republican, presidential nomination
The president and Colonel Roosevelt have
made more than forty xecbea each since
1st Thursday and plan to wind ap their
speaking tours by two days more of rig
orous work. Senator La FttTletta haa
mada fewer speeches, but baa addressed
many Uieaaands of voters.
Governor Wilson' supporter declare
that hia speech at Jersey City last Bight
defined the principal Issue at stake In
the democratlo primary campaign. The
governor aaserted that the real Instruc
tions given the "unlnstrurted" delegates
on the democratic ticket would be "any
body but Wilson." The republican and
democratic campaigns In New Jersey dif
fer widely In that the republican candi
date have made their appeala upon na
tional laeaes. while Governor Wilson and
hi aupportar and the local speakers that
are pleading for the defeat of the gover
nor have dwelt upon tha party struggle
within the state.
The Taft manager today expressed sat
lafacllon with the president's tour of the
"commuting sons," where more than half
the population of the state reside. This
part of the state Is also ths factory dis
trict. Roosevelt leaders aay their candi
date will receive a vote from the factory
worker that will more than offset any
advantage Mr. Taft will get from the
"business men's" vote In the residence
towns near New York City.
Both side claim the four delegate at
large which will be elected by the vote
of the whole a late, and at least sixteen
out of the twenty-four district delegates.
If anything the Roosevelt els una are the
more sweeping
Tne nrst four district, which In area
constitutes four-flftha of the state.
tending free Cap May on tha south aa
rar nonn as Mew Tor city are In doubt.
aca aiae euum two aa sure."
President Taft had to interrupt hi rush
for a short time last night to have hi
throat treated, but expecls to be In .ex
cellent speaking form agala by tomorrow
after reeling a day and two nights at hi
brother horn In New York.
The president will start early tomorrow.
Nlaitlng the towns along ths Atlantic
shors, which heard Colonel Roosevelt Sat
urday. He will, continue his fight right
up to the' hour of opening the primary
election, having arranged today to apeak
at Glaaaboro at noon Tuesday aa hour
before (he polls open there.
Colonel Roosevelt spent the day quietly
In Oyster Bay. Tomorrow be will Invade
the country to the southwest of this city,
going aa far aouta aa Princeton.
Prairie Hens Raise
Large Broods in the
Nebraska Fields
YANKTON, . D, May K-tSpedal
Telegram.! Three Inrhe of rata fell In
Yanktoa thia morning. Rhine creek rose
to a height not known el nee the town
was settled. Msny homes were flooded
and at daybreak Inhabitants were rescued
by boats. Great damage waa done to
city and Country bridge, with heavy
Individual toss. Half of the rainfall (ell
In .twenty minutes. The Jsjne river
valley la flooded and there will be great
loss to farmers. It la feared. The water
la new rapidly subsiding.
GLENWOOD HIGH SCHOOL
HOLDS ITS COMMENCEMENT
GLENWOOD. la. May 9A-(Spertal.-
The usual capacity audience greeted the
twenty-three graduates af the high school
at the opera Bouse laat evening. The
auditorium waa spring like la the pro-
fualoa of green and white, the cess
color. The program waa varied and
unusually Interesting from the spectators'
viewpoint. The salutatory by Elate Evans.
the valedictory by Alice Lamb, the eaua
re by Ewart Howe and the das
prophecy by Hasel Miller were wen rend
ered. The scene from "Beatrix of Clare,"
by Edwin Deupree, Clarence Carter, Max
well Morgan. Eaart Howe. Kelle God icy.
Ruth Brooks and Aaron Bachman
brought out the hlatrtonlc talent In the
elaas.
Foe ae" Cbenre la Withdraws.
TBTTMSEH, Neb, May St. - Special. I
Bert Cnvrden. the young Inaa who was
srreatrd twe weeka ago upon aa sJlegei
eharra of forgery, has beea given hi
freedom. Conden sal accuaed with har
Irg cashed a check far twenty-five dol
lars at a local restaurant, upon which the
same of Jacob Flnxer. a wealthy farmer,
wiv signed. Mr. Finasr. R la said, de
nied the authorship of the check and ft
was turned down at tha bank. Cow-den
was to come up for preirmlnary exaalna-
tion wtthia a few days, bat tha parties
came re ea arreemerjt and the cnarge
was wlthdrawa. -
SeWeta tf-reee Brtaug (Meat Prieee.
TECUMSER. Neb, May K. (pedal
MUe Halstad waa m the St. Louie
afarkets. Monday, with a carload of
horse for J. E. Halated and S-m if this
city. He topped the mark si arr the day
with a toaaa cf alack dial fers nhich
sold for S7av The fauns sa bead watch
- - a
From the New York Journal.
TAFT PREDICTS A VICTORY
Azures New. Jersey Audiences Ha
Xore Than Enough votes.
REVIEWS HIS ADJC5ISTBATT0N
Calls I'noa Baoeevelt far Proof that
Aay Official Aet Waa Deaa
leder Inflneweer at
oaava.
HACK ENS ACK.'N. J, Hay H-In four
of the most thickly populated New Jersey
counties Hudson, 'Essex. Paasaia, Ber
gen-1 President Taft yesterday assured hia
audiences that hi rent minaiion for tha
presidency I certain. H appealed 10 the
voter, however, to mas. n:s majority in
the republican national convention more
decisive by adding to the S7fl delegates
which ha said are' already Instructed for
or pledged to his candidacy the twenty
eight delegate from New Jersey.
From early morning until late at night
the president waa on the go. Vila tour
through the "commuting sone " wss made
In an automobile and for ths most part
over dusty road and during the greater
part of the day the automobile moved
at a speed af mora than fifty miles aa
hour. When he reached Englewood late
tonight President Taft had covered 13
mile. : '
While he continued hi attacks on Colo
nel Roosevelt. President Tart's speeches
were, principally a review of the legisla
tive achievements of hia administration.
He strongly condemned the doctrine of
the recall of Judicial decisions, which hs
asserted would mean to "lay, the ax to
tha tree of liberty."
Thirty Delegates ta (sere.
At Fasaale the president said: There
are many who have not made up their
mind a to now they will vote la this
contest and will be Influenced by what
the victory, will be. It do not think that
la wise, but If you really want to knew
how It I going. 1 will tall you. I have
mor than M delegates to the republican
national convention pledged or Instructed
for ma. Only set are necessary to nom
inate. I have, therefore, thirty to spare.
would be glad to add New Jersey a to
the Hat. but.. they are not necessary to
success. It Is only because I wanted the
fig urea aa large as poaalble that I deter
mined to come to New Jersey. Mr.
Roosevelt's nomination Is Impossible."
In many of hi speecbee the president
discussed the charge mad by Colonel
Roosevelt that tha political "bosses" are
supporting the president's candidacy. He
denied that this la true.
Dcaaaaaa Proof.
"I call upon Mr. Roosevelt." said Presi
dent Taft at Montrtair. "for the proof to
show that any official act of mine haa
been done under the Influence of "bosses'
or men enjoying special privilege. Mr.
Rosaevrit says the bosses' are all for
me and that therefore I must be for the
bosses.' Mr. Roosevelt and 1 are prac
tical men." i
There was much laughter when the
president referred to Coeanel Rooaevett
a "a practical man." and when the ap
plauae bad subsided the president smll- j
ingly added, That what he told
'Brother Harrtman." . .
After pointing out the achlevementa of
his admtnlMratloa and making a plea i
tor tha eunnart af all voters Who -w.M,
la a coosti rational government" the
president continued:
"Whoa a seen coma forward and eaya,
1 like your politic and pond and I'm
goaag to support yew,' would Mr. Baoee
waat aay. WeU. yoa must pass a civil
rata '
The Best Time of Day
' fear',-- rCo'.'
City Commissioner
'Shot by-Friend Who -
Secures' Nd Office
JACKSONVILLE. III..- May -Charles
W. Brown, city eommtsalbner of Jackson,
vlll. waa shot and killed late today by
Ambrose Hurley, formerly chief of police.
Brown waa killed sa he. sat dletaslng a
letter. Ms assaasln firing without warn
ing.' Five minutes later Hurley, Who had
driven to his boarding place three blocks
away, tent a bullet through his ewa head
and died Instantly.
The . double tragedy was du 'to an
"Imagined grievance'' Hurley had against
Brown. A year ago, after Brown had
been elected a commissioner of Jackson
ville under the new form of government.
Hurley did not get an expected appoint
ment lo a city position. When drinking
Hurley often made threat against Brown
and thr latter had been warned frequently
that he had better keep hit eve on Hurley.
However, he had known the man a long
time and la ssld not 10 have had any
special fear of him.
Hurley had been drinking recently and
yesterday bought a revolver.'
Mr. Brown was a civil engineer with a
large business and wss prominent In the
business and social life of Jacksonville
Old Baltimore Hotel
Suffers Severe Loss
BALTIMORE. . May M-Ths' Eutaw
house st Baltimore and Eutaw street a
the -oldest 'bote In Baltimore; waa btdly
damaged, this evening by fire which
started in ths basement from an explo
sion of unknown origin. Much of ths
loss waa caused by water poured Into
the structure; a five-story brick building.
All the- guest escaped In safety,' as
did the ' employes. ' but several of the
fonrier were obliged to come down the
fire escape. A guest named dale of -Chi-
esgo returned to hia room by -mean
of a ladder and saved shout flja) worth
of Jewelry. ' -
Practically the entire hotel bad beea
reserved for the use of the Oscar W.
Underwood force during the democratic
national convention.
LENGTH OF COMMISSIONS'
. TERMS IN DISPUTE
. ,
. HART1NGTON, Neb, May. St-(pe-cial.f-Thia
county la struggling with 9ts
same problem that I perplexing Thurs
ton. Pierre and some other counties af
the state, towlt. whether' rountycorn
mlsal oner's term Is three or four years.
Heretofore the commisslonere - of Cedar
county have always served three yeare.
but It haa been recently discovered that
ths statute apparently fixes the term of
a county cornm.'s!oner at four years and
the qoeetioa aow arises whether It 11
necessary to elect a commissioner . In
title county thia fall. As the matter
now stands both the democrat a and re
publicans have nominee and keen Inter
est Is felt In the situation. If a com
miss loner's term is four yeare the pres
ent Incumbent for the Second district.
,7""t"' '
" r'
era tic nominee, Mr. Carroll of Randolph,
will have to make the race eat over
again some futurs time If he desires
the office. County Attorney O'Gara haa
taken up the matter with the attorney
general and the candidates will govern
theenaelvea sseiniliai M tM acini oa
FIGHTING SPEECH BY, T,' R.
Dd
?'. Li. Kot Bait Contention.
HE EXPECTS TO BWEE? STATE
1 .
Aesens Prefeskleaal B eases la Fast
Aeeastamed to Try Serosa Arm
Tsellea, bat Will Kiel
. Stead - far Them.
ELIZABETH. N. J.. May aV-Wlth all
the . emphasis at his - command Colonel
Roosevelt declared yesterdsy he would
not permit "discredited politicians and
hoaaea" to take control of the re public au
national convention. . He asserted that
professional politicians In the peat had
been accustomed lo try strong-arm poll,
tics. "I won't stand for It a moment,"
ke said.
Colonel Roosevelt made these slats
menls In what he called a "fighting
speech" at Plainfleld. toward the close
of the most spectacular of his day' cam
paigning In thia Mat. H hot about
from place la place by train and automo
bile, firing off speeches In rapid succes
sion to thousand of people, who cheered
him enthusiastically.
leaving Trenton early In the morning a
rut across ths slat to s number of coast
resorts, and than worked his wsy toward
New' York, making his laat address la
KHxabeth this evening.
After speaking here he alerted for Oys
ter Hay to remain over Sunday.
.1 ; Mekes More Cbargee.
- "Our opponents have no thought of win
ning unless they can win by deliberate
cheating in the national convention," said
Colonel 1 Roosevelt at Plainfleld. "The
national oommlttee at supposed to psaa
upon the rights of delegates to sit in tha
con vast ion. If It chooses It can turn out
delegate lawfully elected by the peopl
end put la others.. It is. therefore, vital
to have a national committee that really
represents the. people. Our opponente
have shown that they Intend to try to
use the national committeemen who have
been beaten la their own stats to alt la
Judgment la the eonventioa that repre
sents victory over them.
"For. example, we have thrashed tha
bosses ha Illinois and Pennsylvania, bu
the national committeemen who alt In
I he convention from those stale repre
sent aet, our seventy delegate la Penn
sylvania, but our opponents' six; we aot
fifty-four In Illinois, our opponent got
. .-.. .'
"I went our opponent to understand
thia: If. .the, people are against me I
have nothing to say. but If the peop'e
are for me and discredited bosses and
politician try to upset ua, I shall have
a great deal to say and won't stand for
It a moment. We will , not permit th
rspresentatlves of special privilege to up
set the verdict that tha people have 'come
to. We mean every word we say.
"Whea we went Into this fight w went
in ea the assumption that the people bed
the right ta decide who their candidate
should be. The professional politicians
have beea accustemed to try strong-era;
tactic and could do so with Impunity
when the fight represented a contest be
tween twe factions. It Is not that sort
of a fight tMs time. . It la the people
against the bosses, and I serve aetle
that the bosses will net be allowed til
upset the will -of the people.
Weald Fat Throaah Flatters.
"It Is win or lose with ua la cnlcag"
we In tend ta put through oar platform
We Intend that R ahall declare outright
BISHOP BRISTOL
COMES TO OMAHA
Former Pastor of MoXinley As
signed to This City by Metho
dist Conference,
ASSEONXXBTS GIVES EFASCOPACY
Comes to Kebraik From Field in
South America,
BATED AS BBAIaLTART ORATOR
Held Important Chnrfes in Illinois
Before Ooiny to Waihinrton.
flTJELSEIf SEHT TO EUROPE
Caere A as I a at ABtt-Salewa Leaarae
ea Floor af Caafereaea by Dr.
Saaaeel Dtekte Create
Seaaatlaa.
MINNEAPOLIS, Minn., May .-( Spe
cial Telegram. -Th bishop of the
Methodist Episcopal church ware aaaigaed
to their raatdaaeaa yesterday. Btonop John
U Nuelsea af Omaha has beea assigned
ta Eurteh. Switzerland, ta place af Bishop
William Burt assigned to Buffalo. K. T.
Bishop Frank M. Bristol to aaaujned to
Omaha la place af Bishop Nuelsea.
1 Bishop Bristol haa bad charge at the
Methodist work la South America dur
ing the tost fear rear. Bring at Buenoa
Ayr. B waa aeaetad btohoft at Balll
more In Bat and was tar tea rear pastor
ta Washington. D. C. He woo national
dlasJaettoa as Prsaldsat MeJOalsv-a pas
tor during fcto entire term of office.
Btahop Bristol waa bora ta New York
aatte. but waa reared ta nttnei. Ha
wa ed era tad at Nerth western anrrarattr
and Garrett Blhtoal naadtute. Ke beM a
number of Important pastorates ta Chi- '
rage and Evaaatoa before going to Waah.
lagtoa. He baa a wita. and three sooa. all
la business. Bishop atrtotet to a Brilliant '
platform speaker, scholarly and rhaata
af speech. He haa (aada a good record
as aa admmlot rater.
Attache Antl-saleee Leaeae.
"I am prepare to prove thai the move
ment to change tha headquarter of th
church temperance aoclaty from Chicago '
ta Topska. Kaa, I In th Itnereat of th
Anti-Saloon league. I am prepared t
ptovt It I simply a scheme to do harm
to the church temperance society. Th
head af the Antl-Salonn league. I am
prepared to prove, said thia aoclaty must
get oft Ihe earth."
With thsae words. Dr. Samuel Dlekle.
president of Albloa college at Albion.
Mich," created a sensation In the gen
eral oonferenee of the ' Methodist Eptera-f
pal rhnrch during tha dieruastoa of th
report of the church' coaanittea on tem
pera and amidst ) cries of dertaloo,
continued hi attack, ea tha eeatmittee
report wnlea waa uaiaisssa a ijsssii
Oevemor J. Frank Hnley of Indiana,
Earlier In the day a ehort battle had been
fought over th oommlttee report en
dorsing the. work af the Antl-ttsloon
league, but ;the report waa adopted.
Dr. Dickie's amendment to the oommlt
tee report that Chicago be substituted for
Topeka was rejected after a long debate
In which Pur ley A. Baker of Westervtlle.
0, secretary of Ihe Antl-Haloon league,
answered the charges made againss him.
In election held today 8 Earl Taylor,
W. F. Oldham of India- and F. M. North
of New . York, east conference, were
elected corresponding' ascretarie of tha
board of foreign mi as lone
' aeeretartee Re-Klerted.
As secrets rtee of the board of home
missions and church extension -Ward
Piatt, C. M. twavwenj and Robert Forbes,
all of Philadelphia, were re-elected. Dr.
Thome Nicholson ,of New York waa
elected secretary af the board of educa
ttoa, F. J. Maveetle of Cincinnati and
W. Sheridan secretaries of the Freed
man Aid society. D. B. Downey of Nw
York secretary of lha board of Sunday)
schools and J. B. Hlngely of Chicago
secretary of tha board of conference
claimant.
Th piseopaer committee' report oa
th appointment of bishops, waa aa fol
lows: Atlanta. Frederick D. Iete; Bostem,
John W. Hamilton: Buffalo. William
Burt-. Buenos Ay res. Homer C. Stunts;
Chsttsnoogs, T- S. Henderson; Chii-ago.
William F. McDowell: Nashville, William
F. Anderson: Denver, F. J. MoConnell;
Foo Chow, China. W. a Lewh: Helena.
Mont. N. Luococki 'Kanase City. Kan,
W. O. Shepherd: New Orleans, W. P.
Thlrkteld; New York. Luther R Wilson:
Ok Is Soma City, Robert Mclntyre; Omaha.
F. M. Bristol; Peeln. China. J. W. Bash
ford; Philadelphia, J. F. Berry; Portland.
Ore, R. J. Cooke: St. Lou la. Charles
Smith; 8L Paul, William A. yusvle: San
tv.w.aA Rdwin H. Huahea: Waehlne,
ton. Karl Cranston; Zurich. Swltseriand.
Joha L. Neulsen.
The conference after a long debate left
to Ihe Judiciary committee Ihe eaea of
W. F. Oldham, the missionary bishop,
who wa elected to a place an the board
of foreign mlealona , Dr. Oldham waa
stationed la India and the conference
asked the committee ta decide whether
H would be legal to transfer him to New
York. The question of election of a sue- '
rusor to Bishop Oldham, if the commit
tee approve th change, will come bb
next Monday.
The want ad col
umns 0! this paper
will buy or sell for you
almost anything salable ,
or "bnyable," from old
clothes or furniture to
expensive jewelry, to
automobiles and houses.
They also hare found
thousands of employers
for employes and em
ployes for employers
they are doing it every
day. Turn to the class
ified pages now and see
what is awaiting yoa
there. -
Tyler 1000
(Ceattaaed aa aaaaad. Page.)
F