Omaha daily bee. (Omaha [Neb.]) 187?-1922, May 15, 1912, EDITORIAL, Page 15, Image 15

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    THE BEE: OMAHA. "WEDNESDAY, MAY 15, 1912- 15
SILK HAT HARRY'S DIVORCE SUIT . -
. Some Men Are Born Lucky
Copyright. WU. National News Am.
Drawn for The Bee by Tad
tJOOO MORWNO TUO&e
EjtPECIEO TO XBE" .;
OSWALD JCriMAlX. AT
"W6TJUA4.MCW TOO Ay
Bur i ourr l AiweD
TMCetrwA Hi.
AT HOME- I THINK HQ
XHCA DO VOM avarf THKT STIX-f-
cm wNii ne mis Howis
MAMO lAXr MOKOH fk roo
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9
TWO A VA(i-(W0 TJ Vwff I
Mil HOfUT AMD KJUCO IT I
hO HS SflASBeO Sr I I
tWAACES. J I
i - r.'3 i
flail .
owwfVJOMwJ am fe took ovr
an AC4.isyr Miiuwcc poucy-
"VCiTCWAV He BPOKfe Nil
an& hc ccrs jto a Amd
VI H M)T TO vuoiut
HOW POVOO FlGutC
HIM UmLUCRV?
HOW POVOO FIGotC
( -you cawt I
Married Life the Third Year
A Letter from Helen'i Mother Asking Her to Do Some
Shopping... ; " '
- ' ' i , . i, ,
Rr MABEL HERBERT CRNER.
Cfcrtarvills. Mc April T. Ull-Dear
Beiea: Could you do little (bopping (or
ma? I know It U bard to shop (or other
people, and that it why I try not to send
to you often. But Mr. Daw ion baa so
leueh work thla
spring that an can
BOt "Wisese" ne any
think until July.,
imad you know there
la no one- elae out
Ihere. ......
"What I want
moat I om kind
or a rood . white
'dress. All laat sum
.rner I wore ahlrt
waists with ' my
iblack silk aklrt (or '
beat, but I thought
-
t b I a summer I
would like at leaat
ione good .whit
dress , ......
"I Intended to
have your coualn
Molly, coma and help ma do some tewing
thla spring, but aloe Oeorge'a little (lrl
la ao sick, aha baa to May with' them.
And with UUa rkaumatlam la my band I
can do very little sewing myaeK-nothlnc
good. - ,,
"Now about the dress-It seems 'to me
aome kind o( plain white muue or
India linen, Kith a tew tucka or a very
little lace. Not much lace you know I
don't Ilka thlntf vsfy fuaajr or much
(rimmed. Something simple and we!1 made
with a good full aklrt, lon aleavu and
ttlgh neck. Blae B bust, but If they run
mall perhapa you had better lot eo
that would allow for ehrlnklng. .
"lira Pariah got a very pretty one laet
rear at Chicago, but It had elbow eleevea
and round mok-and that wouldn't look
well (or a woman of my age. (Helen
swilled aa ah read thla, and thought of
the women much Older than her mother
who wore elbow sleeves, low neck and
peek-a-boo walata.)
"I thought you ought to get eomethlng
(airly good for about r Aa 1 wrote you.
we are papering the dining aod the alt
ing room thla aprlng and putting down
m new door on the aide porch, ea I don't
think I would care to pay more -than
that. I have aeaa a number of very pretty
while dreaaea advertlaed ' by aome mall
Brder bouaae (ram ti to I am en
doelng a Clipping ot one. Of eourae. thla
would be much too fancy for me. but I
Judge from thla that you ihould be able
to get Very good plain one for about
"I looked at etrauae" and at the Trade
Palace here, but you know tbey never
bare anything. They wanted ne to order
aomethlng. but I tried that two yeare
ago. I let them order that gray ult.
Bad yori know what U U Uka.
"And new, Helen, If It len t aaking
too much, I ebould Uka to have yu get
ana Borne, kind of a bat or bonnet elan.
Juet aomethlng amall and cloee-fitting,
that I tin wear veil with. And It
Bbould be light; you know I can new
wear anything heavy; It glvea me the
headache. Either all black or with a little
(jouch of whlta or Uvender. However, I
wUl leave that to you.
Tow remember the on I got In Chf
caga ghout five yean ago-blaok lace
Btraw with a bunch of v.aleta and black
velvet DeeT. Father alwara liked that
ao much, thought ft looked better on me
tnaa anything X ever had. But'! aup
Boaa they're not wearing tlea sow. Any
thlng yon aaleet I am aura W1U pleaee
Bee. But I think yot aught U get the
bat for about $3 BV.
-I am aadoclng a money order tor t.
la oaea yoa aauld have to pay a few
dollara more for either the dreaa or hat.
If you ahould have any left you might
get ma a pair of black kid glovea, alee
V I like the aoft, Una kind, hot the
atift heavy kind.
"Now do not worry aver thla hoyplng.
Too know I am at hard to pleaee and
prill be aatiafled with anything yon eend.
I am writing tlua In the dining room
by the open window; and the Whole place
h) OUed with the odor of hyadritlia.
ejow 1 wish I could Bead ye noma:
that bed by the Wet porch tas a ever
bom aa well. The tallpe are all In
Maeaa aad 1M Uiae baah by the -detera
b Jon coming ewt- The garden m look
ing On. - Tour father aaya things are h
Uttla latwthles year, bat M aeema to me
bey are all doing well.
"Am aendlng yoa B" recipe I cut out the
Other day for lemon Uy cake. 1 made
Bom laat week and tt Waa dellcioaa, and
as K waa aa aaay to make, would Hke
tor yasi to try- It ' tt oalla for almond
inavenng, bat If row do-nt happen to
have aay.'vaallla WID Ss ea well-that M
rhat t heed.. : . . - ' '
-Nbw, Helen, do write iqb a long letter.
Tear latum, have heea s abort atnee
JTalrea returned. .X know jtob are buay.
but I da ao love to hear from you, and
know what you are doing. Tou aald you
thought things woald be very much bat
ter now tlnoa Warren'a trip was ao sue
ceattul and his business had Improved.
I do hope-thla la so.
'"Tou hive v aald nothing aboot com
ing homo for a vtett thla ausuaar. Den t
you think you could plan to oorae t
least for a week or sot Perhapa Warren
could come oat after yoo. . If row could
com during the fruit season ws coald
put up a lot of fruit for you to take
back. Father say this Is going to be an
unusually good peach year.
Well. I must close. Am afraid this U
a long and tiresome letter. With much
love. TOUR MOTHER."
"P. 8. Be sure and gat a full skirt, as
you know I don't look well with anything
stretched oref my hips Can't wear those
narrow skirts.' Think I would like a
pleated aklrt, (or that would be nice and
wide around the bottom."
Helen read this letter with a mingled
feeling of tenderness, amusement aad dis
may. How little her mother knew of
New York styles and New York prloea!
Above everything else Helen dreaded to
shop" foY other people,- even for bar
mother.. 'Alwaya ah felt responsibility,!
the fears shs was not getting the right
thing. And Blwaya'ths people of a (man
town have such a mistakes Idea ( the
cost of things rn New York. They In
variably think you can get anything you
want and get It miraculously cheap
just because It Is a treat city.
And Helen knew from previous efforts
how hard It waa to get her mother any
thing, for New, York styles and not
adapted to eulet, conservative eld ladles.
She amlled aa an looked at the ad
vertisement her mother had clipped
evidently from, soma home or fashion
rragaslne: . .
"!' ! THIS US DREiW FOR IU ! !"
Style tint-Dainty, serviceable. Imported
all-over white embroidery. 8et In sleeves.
Novel side rever and etvllah flutni frill
Qraiwful aklrt finished with pearl but
tons ana box pleated back panel. Bilee
tt to 42 bum. ,
The Columbia Mall Order Co., P. O.
Bos tat, J'ew York City.
Helen look at A picture of the pay
Biologically Impossible, slim, alender
w sis ted, no-hipped young women, and
wondered how sr Bear,'' comfortably
tout mother would look In a dress tike
that. Of course, her mother bad aald she
did not wlah anything sa fancy and that
he wanted high Beck and long a leaves.
But the bad reasoned if she could get
this elaborately trimmed dreN with all
Its embroidery and tact for IIS, she
ought to get a vary good plain one
for WO.
But Just her tier reasoning eras
wrong. For In New York It is simplicity
that you must pay for. You sen get a
dress trimmed with yards aad yards of
lac and Insertion, for half at what you
will have to pay for a plain one. The
cheaper the garment the fancier It Is.
And to get anything with long ileeve
and high neck to B white rummer dress
Helen felt the attar Impossibility of that.
And the bonnet the little, mod eat. dose
fit tins bonnet! the knew haw hard that
would be to find la New York. Where the
women of Tl years wear hug bats, with
sodding plumes. However, she must try.
It was true that her mother rarely asked
her tc da any shopping, and now aft
must do the best that aha sauld.
And Helen felt eonsdenos stricken that
she had written her so little lately. She
remembered how when Warren was away
and aha had been aa anile je and unhappy
she hsd written her mother almost every
day. It bsd helped then to hsva soms
ne to hold to. but Bflw Mime she heeded
her less shs had writtea only short, hur
ried notes.
Aad how with an Impulsive desire to
make amends she sat dowa at eaoa and
wrote her mother a ions' letter tell Ins
her many things about the boose, about
Winifred, about her own spring clothes,
and about their day In the esuatry with
the Baldwins last Sunday. ''.
Helen knew her mother loved to bear
cf an tb little details tA her ttfe and
he felt that aha had been very selfish
hi not writing About the dress and bat
he wrote guardediy-aaJd ch wwuM start
out as sooa ss shs coald tomorrow mara
Uig and sea what aha could find. -
But after aba had mallei the tatter
she kent on thinking of her
. te. . ,.
U.eairb aaam av& Vmat
MAC IS CBA.T A ASTAh-7 IW
RAJMbAS eMNHCrU ON MIS
LOT SAT ffO.SWCNSOBj,
MtAjc Ahb fpwerts. on mis J
worn w Ft utvfui wwni
CUvtEK, rowERS, LAW M
5WVY.TMeT WERC 'fWX
OFTH"B.T HrtrW
IN TriE STBECT" -STUFF. THC
BANKER DREW AMATURAL
CHccrcs amd wtwr TO
PATHE.' AfARTTMEATtS. icsVC
APARTMErJTJ , BeLIEvtr Ad?.
A HVSH rU-OVl THB Room
AS THE niOME rArJkHCIXOt
CoyUA CHMSit ACTOR ACT
vtrTriOvT A 9tlc.Vf: 1
M-nXrlAviat AlARweT MT
Ot OtSfvtt TAW
rvV gT SoMaT slot .
MOw. t-trCTIePACAJt.
am K.itrwt Down to th
INLAND. I lUeWAtfOtML.
PCVKr It aM? Of TXtfl
PARKS. I etc Tf?
mi
SAY, VtNTJRrvT, HOW ABOUT
IrVVr ToAAATo OMfclSXI
rr vas THR voice of
On. ie CRtscee. Sue MAD
CMS OP THE Rett-WIAR
A NO I IOWA " APfaTfTK3
THATNleffT. VINCENT'
Knew that comma M)"
VOICE AWD STARTED Tb
rVT on 5ome EKCTRA
SPEED. He VsAC SWiPlUC
THe"ri7rrrTEAJ Moi-LiMnesj
cSCHCTHUi. WXEN HIS
PATH WAV BLOCKED BY
FULLERS CRT OF "HALT" 5
IrWO liuftOTR NOPtrS TO A
(JlftCMNOOLP NCrW 8ff A
vsj AiTER. Of HJ3TE. "
HttiE A ttAf--
Boers. fl tw-f
MOTOR . MAKE RSrIMKa
KACe. I
Baktu. i rrr a
csjtLoA. i seta-Trie
TtCKfTi AAD CctLtCT
I UtMP lev to
a in-cse
2:
KBULY WAS TEU.IWi JANS
AVD BROWrJlE ABOUT Trie
OLD DCrWEft LEAOVC WtCM
"BOMANAM riAD CHRISTY
MATHCVVSOrJ BACKED OPT
TUe A10UBJB - SOMIT SAWe
TOO 41 T 2.THSr
urrktTLLY JBTAMAY
wrm rr till, cen
CAMS IN. HE LIVED ahj
DEMVET AND WAS
RfcTADT TO SHOW KttLY
UP. IcCLLY PAKTIWfi
SHOT WAS
iffALoiTncriMESjrHe.8oXi .
110 HO M(KM DOE! TVefc BAOrKHO .
ME STILL. 'fiDGBKj.!
THtrCARAeJh RWW
The M ACNIAe AftWPJM
9oo Curves, i Do
THIS It TlMCJ A
DAY I -coveR-THc? .
MACHMeT AWD THEW
RVAtM fvm TMC LAST
ryRAW HOME
LVCKY rweirllrvw
.TBMORfcaJ
Compelled to Act Pauper
By BYRON H. 8TAVFFKR.
When Jesua told llmon Peter to pay
the Jewish head tag with the proeaed of
his morning's catch. Ha taught the world
a lesson In paying up! Ne man can really
enjoy wealth which la obtained by de
frauding commonwealth, corporation or
Individual. I
I know a man who will never dar to
flourish a roll of bills He will alwaya be
compelled to turn away from, the rase of
bystsndera when he draws out hl pocket
book. Ha never caa boast that he I
comfortably fixed. And. by the way. harp
you ever noticed how few people, coaiparv
atlvely, can be Induced ta confess thst
they are well off. They seetu to fesr
that In making the admission may shortly
cost them something. The asseeeor, too,
might hear of IU Methlnks If I wars rich
I should Ilka to tell about tt on in awhile!
point to yon house and announce that I
am going to have a new veranda added
nait spring; comment on the price cf
New York Centrsl and say that t expert
to buy a little more of It If It goes down
to a hundred.
Well, this poor fellow I was speaking of
dare never Indulge In that kind of pleas.
ore, though 1 suspect thst hs could do
o truthfully. The reason Is that ha had
not paid what he owes He haa unsstlatled
judgments, out against him. There are
those who are watching him. hoping to
The Life and Death of Metals
How Salt Water Corrotion Has Completed
,the Work American Gnni Started.
1$ LVirr'v '''"". JL""
,,'t T 'i; ' ' k ' i - - ' '
ADMIRAb CERVERA 8 FLAG SHIP, THB "VISCAYA," AS IT NOW LIES OFF TUB CO'ABT OF CUBA. "
Th VtsBri Sank ljara In July. KM. After the 8panlah Admiral's Dash from Santiago Harbor. Stained by the Weather and
Eaerusted with Barnacles, a Oun Turret Still Haines itself Above the rVs.
generous, self-saortflctng mother
Ute in that small eeevafh town
waa aftrr all vry narrow, and ther was
IB tt Httle of change or pleasure.
And Helen resolved that even though
the bat and dress cost much more than
13. even though ah must pay Mr plain
aesa much more m excess ot that still
she would pay It herself and aay Bathing,
rather than have her StOUMr CeapBotnted
la her aery modest and natural desire
tor . "one good white, dress aad a little
close fitting bonnet" ......... .
By GARRETT P. SERVISS.
The two photographs accompanying
thla article possess a very great Interest,
ao only ta their relation to recent Amer
ican history, but also with regard to the
guestlon of the durability of Bietals under
the gotten of weather and other destruct
ive forces. They show the present con
dition ot the great armored (hips of Ad
miral Cerrera, which were bettered to
pieces and gunk by the American fleet
ta ta bsttl of 'Santiago.' Pathetic
memories are recalled by the sight of the
hug, rounded turret at tbe Vlsoaya, pro
jecting above the waves, with ita great
run pointed helplessly skyward, for not
many months before the est break of tht
fief war that waa to send It te the bot
tkst vessel, la all the pride of Its
afsegth, lay peacefully at anchor In New
Toiki bArbor, offering Ita hospitalities to
sdmiriiig vlritora, when no ens dreamed
that it would soon be tbe target for
AiBftrtcan gunners. Many will remem
ber. With B thrill, the uncertainty .that
prevailed whoa the news cams that the
Vlsraya. accompanied by Its great ea.
BorbJ, was crossing tb ocean, with the
poetlble lntenttoa et attacking Ke York,
then a harry eali watt out to the Ore
gon. a 111 Pert tie esast.
BMtrreJ by th hufilrxaeB and winter
norma, t'-esst wrecks have Isia during
ail th inttrvcnirt years ea the coast
of Cuba, and e littlo live they appar
ently been street e ty. the disintegrating
forces te Which ther Hare been sub
tested that recently, our government
thought of the poeatbtllty ot raising gad
reconstructing them for use tot th aavy.
tt does not seem likely that thla pro
ject win be carried out, but the sight
of the ne Bed warships, flabtltig amors
sweater bsttl against tht elements
than .they were able to do against 'a
htnnea enemy, recalls th problem with
which sdenes is now dealing. r stin fur
ther preiongtng the life ef metals The
eoBstanCly trowtng as ot Iron and steeL
and their varSoua alloya. In constructions
of all kinds, renders thla problem one of
the most Important ef modern times.
Covered with baroaelea. and washed
by th pure orai water, the Viscsys
aad the OqueXCo escaped soms ef
th saost dsstructive forces to Which me
talhs ssnstrusaoas are subjected la ether
atnstlona The great enemy of metals
la corrosion, Bnd recent Investigations
have led to the conclusion that this Is
mainly due to electro chemical action. It
has been proved that stray underground
Currents from electric railways exercise
a powerful effect In disintegrating
metals which Isy In their way. These
wandering currents are very insidious,
and eometlmee they atray far from their
origin, In unexpected ways. As th us
of electrlo power spreads the danger Is
acota tasted.
The huge skyscrapers ef today are all
built upon a metallic skeleton, and th
question of protecting their steel ribs
from corrosion l of prlmsry Importssce,
It was ence thought thst Imbedding Iron
and steel In concrete furnished a perfect
means of protection, but that conclusion
Is now seriously questioned. In Hi a
notable Instance ooeurred of toe destruc
tion of the metallic members of a rein
forced Concrete building by electrolytic
corrosion. Sow authorities unhesitat
ingly declsrc that concrete Is not an ln-
I fallible protection to Imbedded Iron and
steel. Under the Influence of a moist at
mosphere electric currents appear to be
capable of peaetretlag the wet concrete,
thus reaching the metal beneath with
disastrous effects. An instance la known
In which the short -circulating of lighting
currenta. In such circumstances resulted
in the corrosion ot the concealed metallic
members.
Th whole theory of metallic corrosion
Is under Investigation and It presents
some trarsfe, and apparently contra
dictory phenomena. In aome case Iron,
teel and Cther metals yields with sur
prising rapidity to the disintegrating In
fluences while tn other cases they exhibit
equally surprising power of resistance.
Iron used In construction thousands of
years ago ha sometime been found al
most Intact, kiid. on the other hand, the
same metal employed in modern construc
tions ha been dangerously affected
within a frw years.
A curious fact Which baa. recently come
to lights Is that the presence of a little
copper In Iron often renders the metal
singularly resisting Id corrosion. At
N'ewburyport, Mass.. some of th links
constructing the cables ot a uapcfutlob
bride's erected a hundred years sge were
found to be greatly corroded, while other
links In the same chain were aearcely af
fected. Examination ahanTrd that the
links, which had escaped corrosion con
tained a little copper. Various alloys
exhibit different power of resistance,
aome giving grsstsr strength or tough
ness and others presenting greater powers
of realstnnro to corroetoa.
But the tllsoovery that electric action
Is responsible for life worst effects of
Corrosion puts the matter In a new light,
and may lead to a solution of ths prob
lem. It Is a curious thought that. In
bending the vast energy of electricity to
his purposes, man hss enoangered soms
of the things most Useful to him. He hss
let loose mysterious forces which tend to
shorten the life of metals upon whose
long continuance much of his greatest
ork depends. , .
discover where he keeps his pile, so he .
keep th tocatloa ot tb pile a secret.-''
He haa ao employment; he must be
claassd aa a vagrant, having bo visible
means ot suppsrL Yet he looks very cam- '
forteble. Ha wears good clothes, and"
dins en urcalent steaks. He aad his wtfa
uks rather extravagant vacations and,,
go to the best shows. But tor fifteen long."
rears they have neve bean beard to aay r
one word about their circumstances.
la not that an awful lite to live? And
all because he holds what someone els "
ought to posses. He never Intense to pay
up. Ceneen neatly hi life I dwarfed; he
haa no close friends; he lives alone la"
the world to about the seme extent s
If hs had absconded to New Zealand. He
la being automatically punished for lur
ing broken Ood law.
Oh that our prearhera would ear mors .
about this class ot sins'. We have bluer :
denunciation tor transgressions that
vividly appeal to our Imagine lion. Ws caa '
easily portray the mlsdemesisors of ths
prodigal, and look with horror upon them. 1
forgetting that they are really abnarmal
passe of virtus. But the meaner sins of ,
selfish greed oast men Into as earthly
hell, which makes the drunkards tot
look like a pa red lee. ,
For rsmamher that Ood la ths author ot
all rule a so commercial morality, no
framed tbe tint statute against short ',
weights and wrote It upon tht fleshy
t.Ma ef our hearts. All who break HIS
rod lost the test, the charm, tu peace
et aa apes Ufa
' 'Almost Cepartaershlp. '
f ptea Sinclair at a vegetarian banquet '
In Wilmington, said e a certain charity i ,
"II I got a big Income, a eumptuous
ulte o offices and a very highly paid :
staff, but what It actually gives to th
poor Is Infinitesimal.
This .ehsrlly reminds me ot a trust
thst employs t.000 hands. i
"Wa'va worked 'out a grand benefit '
system for our veteran employes bow,"
the trust president said one day gleefully. -
" 'Yea.' said ths listener. .
""Yes, the president resumed. 'Every
man that's been wtrh us over thirty.'
years la to get hereafter a nickel medal; .
over forty years a bronsa medal, aad
over fifty years a. solid sliver medal, to- ;
get her with an embossed certificate cult-.
able for framing." Washington tSsr,
The Weakness of Humanity
Modern enlightenment laughs at super
stition, bat few persona have besom so
snllghtened sa to have divested them
selves of sll .superstitious fancies, la
this light we need hot consider funda
mental difference of belief, which cause
the faith of one person to be viewed as
a superstition by another. Ther are In
numerable minor fancies of this nature
from which few ef us can claim to be
absolutely free.
It any man claims to have shaken off
th last vestige of a sneaking belief In
any and every taken of "good luck" or
"bad luck," there la reason to believe
In the progress t a gradual educational
of this ancient folly, but It Is so gradual
that we seldom have to go outside our
own families, and neves beyond the circle
Of our Immediate acquelntnces, to find
strong lingering traces. We loudly pro
fess te be en excellent terms with the
rules ef common Bens, and yet ws find
ourselves clinging to certain things and
avoiding sertain others, for vague rea
sons that have no basis of common sense
and te which there attaches no author
ity but that of pur superstition.
Ws deny any belief in these things, aa
a matter' of eourae. but have to admit
with soma embarrassment that ss mat
ter of practice there are aome things we
VI d
"Z
-V
w.-c
ta
::jBse.:
avoid, such as th wearing ot aa opal, or
tbe begin n lag of aome enterprtee on Fr.
oay, ins inn. w carerully explain that
avoid passing under a ladder because ,
something might drop on as from above, '
with resulting damage, but we seldom
admit the truth, that our care ta this re- "
spect Is baaed on the halt belief that It .
Is a sign of bad hick to re under a lad- '
der. We may have reduced our super
stitions to a. minimum, but ws still char.
Ish a certain respect for signs and per- ,
tents.
In certain trades and callings the die-"
tlonary ef superstition Is a large and
more complicated volume than tt Is to
th ordinary cltiten. Most of us possess .
only the common, stock traditions that"
have been passed along from one genera- ,
tloa to the next Bnd might be called a
heritage of th race, but certain pursuit
hsve their specialties ta tins Una. which
are . almost unknown to outsiders. The '
people of the stage, for Instance, have
various beliefs and semi-beliefs concern-:
Ing good and bad luck signs which would
seem queer te then- audiences. ;
Among sailors, probably, there is mor'
superstition than Is to be found IB ny ,
ether cleat. Th ancient manners held
the wildest superstitions, believed In "en- -chanted
Islands" and all that sort of
thing. Even with all th practical slds
f modem Improvements the sea still -holds
much of mystery and the seasa ot '
terror that tends to keep superstition
warm. A common superstition among.
ssllors Is that which attaches sn evil In- .
flueace to soma member of the crow or
to a passenger. Undoubtedly this belief
originated with the venturous voyag ot .
Jonah.
A writer to the London Globe tells us
that 111 luck t supposed to attach to a
vessel whose name ha sees changed,
and that there It also a gaaeral belief '
among Bailors that a vessel whose name '
ends in A also rests under aa evil epetL '
This - la Because certain vesnels thus
named bars been wrecked, bat ther are
hundreds of ether vessels with a final A "
hi their names that have had the most
fortunate careers. On ha only. to con
sider the Cunard Hits and jta proverbial
good luck, with the ftael A a historic .
tradition la the Bam of every ship.
Providence Journal.
'.' THB "ALsllRAIfTE aXfCENDO" AS IT NOW LIES OFF JUAX GONZALES.
Tht Vessel Also' Bank Near the Short of Cuba ta Juiv, lest President Tafl Haa Spoken of Raising One" or Twoof These "
Vessels for Future Active bervlce, but from the Visws Given. Above Tbey do not Appear to Be Worth tb Trouble.
Tbe Persistent aae jumoous Use et -Newspaper
Advartuua; kg tbe lira fee '
Business Success.