Omaha daily bee. (Omaha [Neb.]) 187?-1922, February 23, 1912, Page 13, Image 13

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    Tim ItKE: OMAHA. FRIDAY. FKBRUAIiY 2:5. WV2.
The (eeg nxe yagazire
p)age
SILK HAT HARRY'S DIVORCE SUIT
Judge Rumhauser Helps Out a Fellow Judge
Copyright. lli National News Asn.
By Tad
iaim-: N I ISTM.S PART 6 ? SfSffl ) I l0SE I I rMMmH'A a
3W) tx.ntu. ) NO-rVwlVW 7 ' los i . Dtvow!iirwiu- 4
. - 1 1 v
r m 1 r- ttt
Married Life the Third Year
In Which Helen's Efforts to Economize Torn Out Most
Disastrously.
r -agsrg3S
By MABEL HERBERT VRNEK.
.-.'.' s-vi.
"v
"Flvs dollars?" asked Helen In dismay.
"Will It b that much? With thlt drop
aklrt and all the lace on the waist?"
The woman took the dreaa from the boi
In which Helen had brought It and shook
it out on the .
counter. "Why, wa
never clean amy
dresa with a drop
leea than IS."
Helen hesitated.
"I'm afraid that's
more than I care to
p a y." flushing
slightly. "I didn't
think It would be
over three."
"You couldn't get
It cleaned any
where for three,"
sniffed the woman,
haughtily, putting
the dress back In
the box. "Why, wa
get tJ for a plain
white slip Ilka
that," pointing to
whit mull dress In the ease.
Meekly Helen took the box and hurried
home. This waa the aeoend cleaner's she
had beep to. and they both wanted IS.
Bhe felt It Would be useless t try to get
It cleaned at' any good place for less and
(ha was afraid to risk the oheaper ones.
In her own' room she took out the dress
and spread It on the bed. Whst eould she
do with It? It was bar best afternoon
gown a pastel blue crepe meteor. She
needed It desperately. But It was too
soiled to wear It as It was-and she
couldn't pay 15 to have It cleaned. Slnos
(ha humiliating letter from 'Warren about
the expenses. Helen had grimly resolved
to spend not t cent on herself pen,
gonallv. '
Money for the house and Winifred she
must take from hlin. But money for her
self -she would do without until she her
self could earn It. She hsd written War
ren that she hsd resolved to be Inde
pendent of him as far as her personal
expenses were concerned, and this resolve
she Intended to keep.
But first of sll she must get her clothes
In ehepe. Whatever new adventure any
woman contemplates, her first thought Is
always to first put her clothes In order.
And so Helen was now going over her
limited wardrobe. 6be had had so little
In the last year, and yet she thought bit
terly. Warren hsd accused her of ex
travagance. This little blue afternoon gown she had
wasted to have cleaned for some time,
hut hsd put It off. hoping to have It done
soma week when the expenses were less
than usual.
Abov everything else Helen loved her
gown fresh and dainty. And now this
must be cleaned. She could no longer
-wear H as It was. With a sudden Impulse
she took it out to the kitchen.
"Delia, do you think we could clean
this dress here?"
Delia looked at it doubtfully. "1 dunno,
ma am."
'Well. I'm going to try. Therea a
bottle of cleaning fluid heer that Mr. Cur
tis brought home for his ties, and we've
never used It. I'll try that on some of
the worst places, and if It's good we csn
get enough more to sponge over the whole
dress."
"I dunno, ma'am. I don't take much
stock In them cleaning fluids. They most
always leaves a worse spot than they
takes out."
But Helen was not to be discouraged
by Delia's lack of enthusiasm. Delia was
never enthusiastic about anything that
might Involve any work on her part.
It took several moments to find the
cleaning fluid among the bet, lea on the
top shelf In the bath room.
"Why Delia, this sheif is :.!-;! with
dust Get a pan of water an! wipe it oft
and these bottles, too they're covered. "
And Delia grumblingly obeyed. This
was why sha always looked with disap
proval on .any nf Helen's ventures t.1ey
usually ended by making more work for
her.
" 'Cleaning Fluid." " Jie'.en read aloud
from the label. " 'Cleans the most deli
cate fabrics without Injur...
" 'Directum Moisten a soft flsnnel
cloth with the Cleaning Fluid and gently
rub the article to be cleaned. Do not
confine rubbing to the sailed spot; by
going over more of the surface no rlnx
will be left. Will not change color or
injure the most delicate fabric. Caution:
Do not use before an open Tre or gas.
- The Cleaning Fluid Co.' "
Helen first covered the dining room
larger. Hurriedly aha poured out half of
the bottle and went over one whole
breadth of the skirt, hoping that by going
over a large surface and rubbing It dry
the rings would be cleared away. Hut
wherever she sponged with the fluid It
left the same mottled, streaked appear
ance, die used the other halt of the
bottle trying to Improve It, but only made
it worse.
Almost In tears, she shook the dress
out over a chair. Had she mined It?
Oh, It she only hadn't touched It. At
least sha could have worn It at night
even It it waa soiled. Bat now, with one
whole breadth streaked and mottled, she
could never wear it.
"1 told you, ma'am. I didn't take no
stock In them cleaning fluids." said
Delia. "They ain't Don of them no
good." And then, aeeiim Helen was al
most In tears, aha added consolingly:
"But I gueaa you can take them streaks
out If you dip the whole thing In gaso
lineIt's much better than all them
cleaning fluids, and cheaper, too."'
"Oh, can IT' asked Helen eagerly.
"Why didn't I think of gasoline? But
where can ws get It enough to dip the
whole dress In? '
"Paint store. I'll taka two of them
gallon water bottles and get 'em full."
t Half an hour later Delia returned with
the big bottlea ot gasoline weighing down
the basket on her arm.
"My, that's heavy," she grumbled.
"And I had to go three places 'fore they'd
sell It to me."
Helen to kolt Into the bathroom, where
there would be no danger of tire. Empty
ing ono of the bottlea Into a large dish
pan, ahe dipped the whole dresa In. The
odor was sickening. Not wanting It to get
through the bouse, ahe kept the bathroom
dour closed.
In a few minutes tha drees hsd soaked
up tha whole panful, and she had to pour
In the other bottle. Most of this, too, was
quickly soaked up. and the rest was
almost black. Bhe tried to rinse It up and
down, but there was not enough gaso
line left for tliat. The fumes were mora
snd more sickening. She was growing taint '
and disiy. as though ahe waa being
chloroformed. And her hands were red
and smarting.
Almost overpowered with the fumes, she
still tried to swish tha dress around. It
s only a black, wet masa now, and she
could nut tell whether or not the streaks
were out. Vet. with desperate determina
tion sha kept at It. It would be bard to
get more gasoline, and now that sha bad
begun ahe must do It as well as she
could. Bo ahe shaok and awtshed the dresa
ebout until she could stand It no longer.
Then she opened the bathroom door and
staggered out, the wet dress on her arm.
"Get a coat-hanger, quick. Delia, Hang
this up somewhere."
"Why. you're as white as paper, ma'am;
what's the matter?"
"Oh. the gasoline-It waa awful In there.
Hera hang this up quii k-"
Delia took the dripping dresa and hung
It on the wooden hanger. And Helen
fell almost fainting on the couch.
"Open the window Delia. Oh, I'm so
sick."
Delia threw open the window and
dragged the couch before It. Helen,
deathly white, was lying almost In a
stupor. Snut up In the bathroom, with
the fumes from two gallona of gasoline,
the effect had been aa drugging and
much more sickening than from gaa or
chl-iroform.
Thoroughly frightened. Delia wanted
to send for a doctor. But In spite ot the
stupor, the word "doctor' brought to
Helen the thought that had dominated
her through It ail, "the saving of ex
pense." "No, no." she protested faintly. "I
don't need a doctor. I'll be all right In
a few momenta
Aa she lay on the couch by the open
window the horrible sense of nausea
gradually parsed away. Slowly the fresh
air revived her. blew away the worst
effects ot the gasoline, but left her with
a throbbing sine headache, which lasted
the rest of the day.
Delia brought some cold cream for her
hands, which were still red and smarting
from the gisoline. At length she rat up,
dltxlly.
"Rrlng me the dres, FKIs. Let me
see bow it came out.'
"Walt till you ftcl better." urged
Delia. "You're dead white yet, and it
ain't dry nohow."
"Oh. it must be dry br this time.
Bring 1: in I want to ee- it.'
Keluctantly Delia brought the dress,
laid it on a chair by the couch and dia-
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toponu.
The Brewer of Ghent
Djr KKV. THOMAS B. GRKOORY.
February 23, 183T.
Through the atreeta of Ghent. SiS years
ago today, crowds of burghers were
marching from house to house, calling
tor their comrades, snd saying unto them:
"Come with us and let us hear tha wise
man's c o u n s e I."
Presently they
lined up before
the great curved
entrauccway to a
stately home and
made it known that
they would like to
talk with tha
nfaater of tha
house, in a very
few minutes tha
great oaken door
opened and there
stood before them
the stalwart form
of James Arte
velda the brewer of Ohent."
tranoeway Is a stately home and made
II known that (hey would like to ta
with tha master of tha house. In a few
mlnutea Ihe great oaken door opened and
there stood before them the stalwart form
of James Artevelde, tha "Brewer of
Orient."
"We know that you are wise and that
Secrets of a Famous Chef
Cookiof Adrice to Girls and Hints
on Preparing Chxken and Fisb.
By KMII.K 1IAILLV.
In Germany there Is a proverb to the
effect that no girl should marry until
sha knows how to cut bread properly not
that cutting bread Into thin, perfect
Hues Is a high art, but It does require
practice, and if a young woman can do
It properly It shows at once that she
haa had some experience and la at home
In the kitchen.
I do not think any young lady should
msrry unless she knows something ot the
art of cooking.
No matter how exulted her station In
life, her succeea will depend upon the
excellence of her cuisine if she is a
woman of wealth. Just aa a good deal of
her happlnrsa does If she is the wife of
a man In modest circumstances.
married, come to the well known chtfa
fur Instruction.
Yoti will frequently see classea of Ihexe
charming young ladles working away lu
the kitchen of a hotel or celebrated
restaurant, under the direction of a chef,
watching him and learning how to order
a well balanced dinner, and to discrim
inate between whst Is really good cook
ing and what Is merely good food spoiled
by over elaborate preparation.
Here they learn the combination ot food
and vegetables, salads and desserts,
which later on make their dinners such
gastronomic successes.
It Is largely because the French hostess
and her chef or cook understand each
other and because the lady of the houac
discusses and advises with her cook thst
the French cuisine In private houses still
II
table w:th a sheet and then spread the ' erectly went back to the kitchen. Helen
dress out uimn it. Pouring m- of tr.e : gave or.e eiance at it, and then burled
fluid in a saucer, she srorig"d the spots ! ber fn in the pUlow. It was mined
around the b"ltom of the fklrr. carefully ruind.. All o',r it the dirty gasoline
following the .lirwtion. i had S'Ui'.I In clouded, mottled 'treats.
But. to her dismay, dark r'ngs outlined , .he tinned ber face to tlK "..i,! aod
the pieces tTiat l-.ad been c e.,nii. And burM :r.-t tear.
when she tr e,j to ;:. see tw' the rins- And this this aas L.-ie re4: of her
ahe auw'e-i -' in miking th-n j efforts t eeenomitve
. c4 rVSidiV I V:. . Lr-
t sW i I v SiS
l --J-.I! EO!4, x., tJl.il I I
- I. UsftJ
aw ip J aT assssssassjaj , m- S ' I 1 . M I
trig at .vim? miiiuet! iindrr&taiiHiMe. AM
v m "v cti
- ffM iut .Ml WOMEN WORK
x ,j -
ranks nign. r than In oth
Efi. '.l
NO GIRI, BIIOUI.D WAItl'.T VXTIL
HHH KNOWS HOW TO CUT BREAD
I'ltOPKRLV.
and flour In a saucepan and stir con
st! ntly for five minutes. Then graduslly
pour In the milk, stirring briskly with a
whisk. Add salt, whole black pepper,
about twelve, and a little mushroom
liquor or other flavoring. It at hand;
also a bouquet composed of six parsley
stalks, stalk of pure celery, one bay leaf
and spring of thyme, one clove, and tie
together and put In the sauce. Let It
cook well for fifteen minutes. Than
strain carefully.
Serve this ssure with a garniture of
rns-hed red pepper and cayenne.
FILKT OF KlXUFItm OR BASS CA-
t MOltiK-FOU FOL'R PEOPLE.
Take two kliigfish or bass, each piece
i about one pound. Take off the filet, aalt
ami pepper them and cover them with
flour. Then etiok In butter. Have ready
four pleers of exgplant cut lengthwise.
Salt anil itrtnr thni a fium .,.-..-,.
good cooks have a k.nd of prt.ale code. floiJr fry ,n B)
i nnr r'-'cipes are use asetcnes nisae
you love liberty," said tha burghers.
"Will you be our leader and help its ta
overcome our enemies?"
"If It Is your will, comrades, and titer
Is no ons else I will do ths best I csn
for you." Then all said, with ons voles: ;
"Ws promlss you faithfully ta stand by
you In ail matters."
Artevelde was s great man. and In !'.
little while he secured ths hearty so-. .
operation of the fifty odd guilds of tha
city. At the head of his "Whit Hoods."
aa ths burgher soldiers of Ohent war ' ,'
called, he soon drove Into axil Count i' '
Louis of Crecy. who bad for some tint
bean trying to play ths king game over ';
ths people; and, establishing peace and :
order, proceeded ta rule the country la
accordance with damocraUa prtnolplea. '!
Under his wis and righteous rule th ,
weavers of Ohent grew rich and tbs
whole province prospered as It hsd a ever '
prospered before.
go great did Arteveid make Flanders ,
that Edward III of England sent am
bassador to requeet his aillanoa. And V.
right there began mil Ms trouble. As''
petrtotlo as Wsahrngton, Artevelde did '
not possess th solttleeJ wisdom of th -great
American, and, accepting Ed-' "
ward's vertures, hs found himself at '
last in th 'ntangttn7 alllaocssT which ;
were to ruin him, "
Threatened by th continental attempt ,',
to crush his democratic burghers, he tried '
lo persuade his countrymen to accept th 1
Black Fiinc as thalr titular sovarelga, ,.
thus securing ths mighty support ef Eng--land.
Tha proposition angered the burgh
era, eeperlslly the of ths city ef Ghent,4,,
and It was all over with Artevelde.
Artevelde's motives wars pure and no
ble, but th majority of th people
thought otherwise, and they turned '
agalnat him, In bloody battle between , '
the guilds in ths market plar at Ohent
tha party of Arteveid was defeated, and A
the once popular and always wall-meaning
leader waa a lata, four years almost to .
a day, from his accession 1 sower. ' ;
It was th last of Flanders aa well as
of Artevelde, tor from that day to thl .
the country haa had only now snd the "
a crumb of the sweet morsel of demo
cratic freedom. Arteveid put of th way, .
there cam the eounta, and then Charles -V
and tnen Philip II. and th lone Iliad
of woes that no Flanders man can ever
forget.
rlECTION
ILL
OK
1XO UNDER
CHEF.
homes.
If you want good cooking and under-
The woman who Is lo di.-pense Urge i stand an) thing of the fut.Ject. vou will
and ro: hospitality needs to know how know that to get the bert results fr-irn
; to ord-r. wt.mai or lesser mesns ' your cook ou mu-t do more than write
's!.o'-:d knw l.ov t ;;;. orders or a ;.p or p:er Y.xe llwm
! In France C.e vuung ladles of the b-n . t:anst.l:ttd h the I .:-e I eeper or njsid.
jsocictj. wtKtt they a e eneagel tu Le j Vou m'j-t con-ul! n;th ;.our coji. .;e!-
for a big painting, which can only be !
filled In by a person who understands the 1
art of rooking. 1
The following re lis arc amplified and
completed lo fit the needs ot the ordi
nary cook and amateur:
BREAST OF CHICKEN'. JOSEPH
HAAN-FOIt FOUR PERSONA
Take two broiled chickens and slice off
the breast, making four perfect pieces,
one piece for each side. Remove the
skin. Have ready four ci uata f bread
the exact stiarm of the chicken breasts
and about four inches thick.
I'm the yolks of three eggs In a deep
dish, add a little full, stir well and add
lonly six soupspoons of heavy cream.
Now place the crusts In thla mixture and
let them soak for a few moments. Re
move the crust, dip them quikly In
bread crumbs and place them In a pan
:th cljnfl'd butter. Fry to a nice
hruwn tolor. I'lsre a napkin in a dish,
arrange the crusts on It. Put Hie broiled
breast of ihicken on the erupts and
spread a little drawn butt-r mixed with
bread ciurtibs oer it: Karnish the dl-h
with psrsle:'.
With
Pec four tomatoes, take out th seeds,
stew them in a pan with a little butter,
pepiier and sail.
To Kcrve place the eggplant on a long
dish and put a filet of fi-h on each slice
of eggplant. Cover with the stewed
tomatoes and over this sprinkle cheese,
chopped very fine and some very fine
herbs. Fine herbs, used so much in
French rookery, consist of half a small
onion, two shallota, two sprays of pars
ley, two pieces of chives and the cloves
which slready figure In thla recipe. The
"fine herbs" are chopped very small.
It's easier to make love than it la al
ways to mean It.
A woman who can apeak seven lan
guages generally does.
bvery man a rreolt Is good when It
vomea to borrowed trouble.
A hotel patron la justified In kicking
when he haa to pay good dollara for poor
quarters.
It Is well to exercise your rights, but
don't work them to death.
Some people who tell everything they
know don't have much to sav.
Few men will register a kick If they
The man who Is always on time wastes
imam- valuable hoars watting for the
ins sen a sauce lcnanHl mane ;otner r-liow
Ket more then their moneys worth.
Many a man haa been accused of stesl-
I"'' ' """" " "'" "'" log kisses when in realltv they were
1 r- n.iik i.n.1 e.nlng. P'a.-e the butter ,fr, tj upon him.-Chicago News.
of two ouri'ts of butter, t
fu'r i f f!oii-. a pint an,l
o tablet-noun- !
l. .if of ix.il- 1
.
MANT RISKS TAKEN TO
TO MAKE PICTURE FILMS
If figures mean anything tha moving
picture show la ths most popular of all
our national amuaementa, not excepting
base bail, which undoubtedly thoroughly
deserves its till as ths national sport
of America. But ths calico oosueif and
drama dally entertain more parsons than
any other form, of pa bhe diversion aver
devised. Already this Infant tadsstrf haa
jO..00 Invested In It, although only
eight years bar elapsed sine a second
rate theater gars the first film exhlbltloa
In New Turk.
Today there ar more than SO houses
In th metropolis alone devoted wholly
or principally to moving pictures, in th
entire country there ere many thousands
of gaudy little theaters, marvelous with
tiles, gliding, marble, costly mirror and
Ingenluus trick electric signs.
There srs scores of picture companies
employing staffs of authors, actors and
scene painters to give them th peeper
settings and all the paraphernalia, hu
man and otherwise, ot th regular thea
ter. In every city and town throughout
the United States exhibitors eagerly
await Ihe latest creation f th moving
picture studio. And the printing; of and
dispatching to Ihe four corners of th
continent of the latest films Is a business
in itself, resembling nothing so much as
the preparing and dlrtribuUng at metro
politan daily.
The business haa extended even la
Mexico, Central and South America grid
tli Panama canal son. Every daw la
New Tork the combined length ef th
films reeled off would reach across the
Atlantic, and th film exhibited dally la
all the American picture theaters would
easily encircle th glob.
With ths enormous growth of th mov
ing picture business there has coma Into
exist rare a class ot adventurers who at- '
most dally risk Ufa sad limb ta btaia.'
realistic effects for moving; picture com- -panic.
On of th most daring of toes '
Is B. B. Dobha, who recently At tad sp a
small schooner at Seattle and left for
Alaska In order to portray ta saovins; ,
picture the birth or death of a aew is
land. It aoprara that the Boerosiof group -In
the last year or so has heaa arising "
from and subsiding Into th Tlai la sea. -A
moving picture syndicate has offered -Dobbs
tas.m If he gets the fUra. Tech
nical World Magmxtne.
A man wonld do many a wonderful '
thing It some Itttl thins war saw, sa la
way.