Omaha daily bee. (Omaha [Neb.]) 187?-1922, December 23, 1911, EDITORIAL, Page 19, Image 21

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he ee' tne jyiaaziiie p)a
ge
SILK HAT HARRY ADVERTISES FOR A WIFE AS A LAST RESORT
Copyright, 3911. National News Assn.
By Tad
Sy eo NK I ?uT AN AD
IN HOME
kb. h n e l tiTp a v
T&P- a wife and ttjld
THEM TO UU. AT" i"
THIS GSiEXiNfr.
5CTTHG. Pick- of
( too At i-E-Ar
GEE
THAT" vnAS
JOME lvETA -
WARRy
--
( COME: UP
I S0J C AN VKAtT
jnThe kit: Hern
j tiu. i Look.
I THETM OVER.
n CI
35
I &JT CHA-
lU. 00 THAT-
TV AT" WO
OONr CrT
.STVNfr
I " '
TMEV ALU
CVOMT ANYONE-
Call ro Jea.
3AH oeywAM
aooJof rey
And Another.
MAN COMES OP
A(t) H VMAi V0'
BROTHER.- M
EM OVCfc PCKS
ONE" 5uT ANO
GO 6$ AWAV
CM OVER PCKS V
ons"5utano
erP-H I Go g$ Awav iS,
rweys &o?n
down rW
JTECT NOW
LOOK OUT 0
IMEMETt HAP '
1 i
Mr
Haw
UVDGE-J
7
, 1.00ftNCr FOr
Strange Objects in the Sky
J
By CiAKUKT I. SKKY1SH.
Astronomers have heen crratly puzzled
nf late by a cnrloiiK apparition In the
heavenK which Is supponed to be a new
asteroid, or small planrt, traveling In
an eccentric orbit which, at times,
brings It nearer to
the earth than any
other body except
the moon. More
over, It seems to
have a most ex
traordinary shape,
Hs,lf it were a hug
slab of rock or
metal, very thin in
proportion - to its
length and breadth.
At least that Is th
suggestjqn offered
by Mr. Crommelln,
the calculator of
the orbit of Haley's
comet,
This - remarkable
object was first
detected by Ijr.
Palls of Vienna at
the beginning of October. A few tights be
fore,1 Dr. Pallsa had discovered a new
asteroid In that quarter of the sky, and
at the. same time he noticed that what
he had taken for the Image of a star
on his photographic chart - had disap
peared. On October J he, 'was astonished to ste
close by his new . asteroid another object,
which appeared to be moving rapidly
away. He repeated his obnervaiiuiie, .iu
en the. following nlpht they were con
firmed by Herr Pe;hule at Copenhagen.
Then, owing to cloudy weather, combined
with the dimming effect of full moon
light,' the strange pbject was loBt to view.
Rut on October 2t It was photographed at
the Greenwich observatpry. furiously
.enough, however, on the very next night
the Greenwich astronomers were unable
to find the object, and it appears not to
have been seen sfnee.
Its curious conduct as to visibility, now
appearing plainly and now disappearing,
led to the suggestion of Mr. Crommelln
already tnentloned. According to this the
object, while It could not be less than a
couple of miles broad, may be so thin that
when turned edgwlse toward the earth It
cannot be seen.' When the broad face
c
THANKFUL TO BE AL1VE
By Jonies W. Mct.ee.
The Beef Trust's up for trial,
Though the .price of beefs up, too;
But. b'gosh, we can be thankful
That the Bf Trust s In or stew.
The poor are doing the turkey trot.
To eat they- can't contrive;
Bo the ordinary mortal
s jast thankful to be alive.
r-w 1 1 1 ! i -v i
The Leather Tiutt In thankful
. For the tariff that protects;
The fact that people raun wear shoes
i Is proof that It collects.
The Milk Truct cries for ten-cent ml!k
And butter forty-five;
Bo the' ordinary mortal
Is just thankful he's alive.
The grafter, too, Is thankful
That the taxes got a boost,
He'll get his little rake-off
when the money Is unloosed.
The thankful landlord sees hla chance
. To raise us four or five;
Bo the ordinary mortal
Is Just thankful he's alive.
The barons of the Sugar Trust
Are thankful to a man
That sugar reached Its highest
Blnoe the civil war began.
With coffee almost doubled
For the trust knows how to thrive
The ordinary mortal .
Is just thankful he's alhe.
was illuminated by the sun It was bright
enough to be photographed, but when It
turned sidewlse it was swallowed up In
the ilarknefs of space.
The existence of such an object In the
solar system serves to recall attention to
the v theory of the German astronomer
Olbers, that the small planets called as
teroids may be fragments of a larger
planet which has exploded. These frag
ments, especially the smaller ones, may
be of almost any form, and, owing to the
attraction of the larpe planets, the orbits
which they pursue through the sky may
be gradually changed In position.
One of the principal objections to this
theory has been that we cannot well con
ceive of any force whleh'eould cause a
planet to explode, and be shattered and
rcattered broadcast In space. Hut Dr.
Gustav Le Bon, reasoned from the In
tegration characterises all matter, sug
gests that explosions among worlds may
not be such inconceivable phenomena as
has been supposed.
"It must not be forgotten," he. says,
"that the atom, being an enormous reser
voir of energy, is by this very fact com
parable with explosive bodies. These last
remain Inert so long as their Internal
equilibria are undisturbed, -hut so soon as
some cause or other modifies these they
explode and smash everything around
them, after being themselves broken to
pieces." -1
"WOMAN
LET VOUl tICrT 5rre dEOB. VI EM -
ttPUOW0UR AUTV LAMPS BETFoRC A COP.
M
n6 PU30R vnaukgtr im rne'Oifr
n"? 0OUT-F-A.D.v TO
iROPFio exhaustion Since, t
N TMS MORm.no h HAD 6LFN
COJV 01 RECTI N O 00O6S TOPHC
OreiSEVT-D ETiA-RTM GT r S
TM6 OtyMCr SOWMOEC) AT b AnO
HE iftl) JTARTET) TQ DU) NWr
Xooteo oh wit. SLTreiw
IP rXvOMAN vwAi APVO I IS T7t)
LETTE7? Carrier vouco She
NEAH A MAtL" 3u T
OUT OF fv THEATRE V.
NO MiOCEL 5HOVA HAfAS
CAiN AAAK M LT ev
n For? Nunc H
ONI RiNft CiLu irvnjT
&T01tii. it i m r..,
"S A 0n NI(tHT JtAhP j
KN ' HEiy Pack op
TH ETA Bit At p.cCmaptci8.
POOR f-ATTvy DA00V WA AtOST"
CR0Akin(9 FAO' 6. rmctc
OaOMG 7HEN LO&&EO Him TV
A P'Lt-pARl-Ora ANO MEN THE
Ufr Ci.CT2 5LATPE0 feME'oope
DOVMN TWROAX A MOMe-NT-
J-ATEU fATROU-eO OMER ANft
IF A OIP NHKE.O rwy nATLM
WHAT C00-D ARSENIC
p AN ACTRESS FAIN rep
-N Txt por office voulc
A UEMhTfL carrier.
PROMT 5HOVN TWF
&ETN TLE MAN TO ffo
Put y? TENTi JatTlCKETJ
RmrME.jAiov Pro ole
P06rAfVl MCJi ptAVN me
Hlpoi"' rxe akmq
TBOPt P'Ot Ifc9uClcN(j
OONKRW DO fev fARp
IWttIC)
2 i
rwe jMjj.nMf. Guv i 5rRou.GP
oAe.ojTTKeTrro rutin. ACT JOE
JiAiO I ME-r a, F.E(L.rTL ffJO
exve tmc orHevt. oav i said
MOV W.UCM ,i , .Nort UP
Me J'0 (OOO VPAJU
IVHOWMUCKIU N.(.Kt.
UP THEUt SA.0 .dOOO 60UI
I L'O LCe.0 MfTAN.tKfit.
PTUm vnEnT n'oa
M0'mtm6 liAu-fcTIUy p1PEX
IF 00 pep THC
IAMCTHArVMOMrXN BE
THr I HU TAfcE DOWN
7KE rtNTi pAtg TMM ON
TMfcTRuCKi LEAP TMC
MORiEJ Down rHCN I
5leet v(Tm them ritoNA
ONE TO OiR Tlu-wt
oET TO rw& NET TOWN
I7 GEE" I NW
A MAPPvlTBOOTlLC
l iwf I at AAA Aw I
af'
Married Life the Second Year
Helen Plans to Make Christmas Eve Less Lonely for the
Homeless.
1)
"I forgot to write you that I.aura Wil
son Is In New oYrk. Her mother told me
she had a position In soma big law office
and gave me the address of the place she
Is boarding. No. West Twenty-second
street. If you have
any time you
might call on her.
I'm sure she would
be glad to see you.
It must be very
hard for her to
start out alone for
herself In a strango
city. But since her
fathers death
think they are In
pretty bad wsy.
Ma left nothing but
their home and the
lot adjoining It,
and they've already
had to sell the lot.
"Well, enough of
this. Anna Is wash
ing today and I
have to get sup
per. With much
love. "MOTHER."
Helen read this
Hy MAllKh HKRHKIIT t FINER. Jt
I
A Little Honey And a Handful of Clay"
"A Rose A Lily A Dove A Serpent
Copyright, 1011, National News Ass'n.
-;- By Nell Brinklcy
"Vhat Little Girls Are Made of."
Inat ni tt liar
. ' ' - - p " ..w.
) Wilson was here In New York trying to dine with us the
I make her own way! Yes, It must be hardj "Oh, I'd love
always been a sensitive, delicate girl.
Helen resolved to go see her at once.
And this was Saturday, the one ' after
noon she might be at home, for she
would probably have only a half-day at
the office. At any rate, she had some
errands downtown and it would not be
much out of tho way to stop there.
It was just 4 when Helen rang the
bell at No. West Twenty-second
street. It ws a dingy, old-fashioned
house. A muddy grass mat was Inside
the vestibule and some soiled netting
covered the glass panel of the door.
A slovenly German girl answered the
bell and Oshercd Helen into the dark,
shabby parlor. The whole place had an
air of dreary dejection. Helen gnsed
around while the maid climbed reluct
antly up the sxa;rs to see if "Miss WIN
son was In." It wn not often that Helen
had occasion to call at a boarding house,
and she was curiously Interested In It all.
There were some cheap Japanese vases
on the mantel, a black marble clock (not
running), some shells and a dusty pleoe
of coral. The once "old rose" upholstered
furniture was torn threahare, the worst
places on the arms and back of the
clbalra being covered with tidies. Home
faded chenille "portieres" hung over the
- . . . - . i- - . 1 . A I.I. ,k. "hflnl,
lolullig ooors ini ica "-.
parlor," now undoubtedly used as a bed
room.
There was a sound of eager, steps on
the stairs and 1-uura Wilson appeared at
the door. Her surprise and pleasure in
seeing Helen were most evident.
"How long have you been hare?" asked
Helen, when the first greetings were over.
"Almost three montns now.
And you like It?"
"IJke It? Oh, I'm so home-sick," with
a catch In her voice. "I can hardly stay.
The day at the office Isn't so bad but
oh. the evenings and Bundays! I almost
die of homesickness then. Sunday In a
boarding house is the most depressing
think In the world."
Helen smiled, "is, I suppose It 1. But
you mui.t come and see us after this.
We're almost always home on Sundays.
You should have looked mo up or let me
know you were here."
A little later I-aura asked If Helen
would like to see her room. "It's not,
much of a room," with a laurh; "but I
don't think It s quite as funereal as this
parlor."
They went up three flights of stairs
to the little room the fourth floor back.
"Wait, I II light the gas. That'll make
thing look less cheerless."
The furniture was even shabbier than
that In the parlor, but I.aura hud put out
a few of her own things, it 1 some
times amazing what a few photographs,
a half-dosen books, a work basket and
the personal belongings of a dainty wo
nisn will do for even tho most hopeless
loom.
"Not a very charming outlook, It is?"
nodding toward the landscape of roofs
and clothes lines outside the window.
"At first those gray roofs and back yards
gave me the horrors-but I'm getting
more used to them now."
"Hut you're not in your room very
much?" ventured Helen.
"No, on'y on Bunduys." with a shud
der, "and 1 think I'm becoming obsessed
with the horror of that day. IJon'i let
mo talk about It. Are you cold In here?"
suddenly going over end opening the
register. "I keep It closed most of the
,1 - n Li mi t ha snfit ami ndnl of
who w , -
cooking. Oh, tho dust and dirt here are
dreadful. 1 nave to oust una room every
evening as soon as I come from the office
or 1 couldn't lay anything down. They
1
have only one chambermaid for the whole
house and she only spreads up the bed
and smears things over,"
Helen lauarhl. "I'm ifnU Am,mr
haven't yet become recondltl to the New
iorK rooming house.
Reconciled? I'll never tutoom Mn.
cited. Just as soon as I can afford.lt.
i m going to hsve a little two-room
kitchenette . apartment and send for
mother."
'Oh. that will be nice for vu.ih.
New Tork won't seem so dreary. And
you'll look forward to Sundays Instead
of dreading them."
'Yes. but It'll be at loot ri Mnn.k.
before I can hope to do that-lf I don't
die of home sickness In the meantime.
If I could only go home Christmas. The
inougnt or spending Christmas and New
Year's here alone. Oh. ihnu i A....
will be worse than Sundays,"
murs, i wish we were going to have
dinner at home Christmas, and I'd hava
you wan us. But Warren's mother Is
having a family dinner, and we're going
'r uarne's for New Year's
But, oh! I ll tell you what we can do-I
nvtend to have a little tree, for Winifred
Christmas eve, and you must come and
umn wrai us men.
tA hit T HIJ.i, - '
. . . , - uiuu i mean
thmk"0 "d hoUdayB that 'ou'
"You know X don't. I can understand
-It must be fearful to be her alone.
And there Is something about Sunday
other day. Warren h.. w
k ? Upy" "nC" w married.
k m w "ra tney wer- And a
holiday must be worse, i wish I'd known
ou were here m u-a .... .
Tha.k.g.v.ng. W.ta-
, ?"yuf my ,f 1 have
gotten Into the nrrir i-a u ' "
i ,7,17 7. " 1 ""'""" In order, but
I Just couldn't! I wro ,u- . '
rUnno!r k bor,nK ,ou w,th w ; I
suppose because If. ,0 ong Ino ryJ
...j uni io IB1K to"
tsTim 'tk''"' ,,m' Whe" io help
to talk. Then you didn't go out at all
Tranksglvlng? You stayed her ,tniW
room all day?" n"
lurn, nodded. "I .uppc.M j ,houI(J h ;
on. to church, but wmehow I Ma-s
hsve the heart tn. " 1
. . vu,..H i ao aitner. And thera
wasn't anybody in .h- i, ....
They hod d,nn.r intZot:
everyone went to the matinee
or to c... The old maid on the oor "b,!
low and I were the only one. here for
supper. And oh. the .-T. p
. --rf-'i man i go
down because I was hungry-but just for
a Tv " "' ,n "alls were dark
and there was just ua t.
... - v iim-u only
on. gas jet burning In the dining room-
" , "emeni dining room! J cam.
back up stairs and threw
... . . . . ua in.
,m r me rest of the evening
"YOU POor Child." rniirr,.. ... .
do wish you could get your mother her
f,oonJ "!!." how l,ard " '0- you
.... i mi., out qon t you think In the
mean time you could get Into a mor.
cheerful boarding house?"
Yes, but I'd have to nv .
the more I can save the quicker I can
sci moiner nere.
A Half hour later Helen u.
home, her mind full of Laura and her
lonelluesa. Her cry of "Oh. the Sundays
and holldays-I can bear anything else'"
kept haunting her.
When Warren came home the told him
of her call.
"And, oh, she's living the dreariest
most depressing boarding house. I've
Invited her for dinner Christmas Eve,
And I thought we might have Miss Fan.
ton and Mrs. Sandford you know, they're
both slone, and It must be so hard to
tpend the holidays In a boarding house.
And, oh, Miss Andrews, too I always
feet so sorry for her. Don't eu see,
dear, we'll make our Christmas ISv. din
ner a dinner for the homeless."
"Humph-a lot of detached females
and I'll have to take thera all home."
"But won t It be worth while to give
them one evening away from their board
ing houses and a real horn, dinner?"
"All rlgh, go ahead. But don't count ma
In on the entertaining. This Is your party
you'll have to put It over yourself,'
"Oh, J will," gleefully, coming over and
kissing him. "You won't have to do a
think but sit at the head of the taht.
look handsome."
"Allrlght." modestly. "I'll try to do
that."
t
A solid foundation should be laid for
every fabric balloon house or a to..
chapel.
f
I