Omaha daily bee. (Omaha [Neb.]) 187?-1922, December 15, 1911, Page 13, Image 13

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    TITO BEE: OMAHA. FRIDAY, DECEMBER ."). 1911.
liThe ee'g ftng Magazine a
EXTRA! EXTRA! SILK HAT HARRY GETS HIS DIVORCE
By Tad
VHS OOnT
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Extravagance as a Cause for Divorce
ny DOROTHY DIX.
At the opening of the fall term at court
Jn TMttaburnh. 100 women and ninety-eight
men applied for divorces from their mat
rimonial partners. Fifty of tho men
Baked for divorces
on the. ground
of extravagance,
claiming that their
wives spent too
much money on
fashionable gowns
and hats.
And this In Pitts
burgh whose men
have the reputation
of burning 'P tho
long green: Or,
perhaps, they only
burn It cheerfully
for women not
their wives.
The question rais
ed by these Pitts
burgh divorce sta
tistics is an Im
portant one, and
Jt would be Inter
esting to know just how much part
women's extravagance plays In domestic
Infelicity, and in how many divorce cases
If the real corespondent Was named
it would be the millinery store or the
bargain counter.
Undoubtedly there ar many women
who ar dress mad, and who in order- to
disport themselves In the latest Paris
finery are perfectly willing to ruin their
husbands, or work them to death. Cer
tainly any man is justified in getting
up and leaving such a woman. Better the
divorce court than the bankruptcy, court,
and wiso the man who has the courage
to free himself In time from a wife who
Is 'so heartless and so selfish that Bhc
thinks more of adorning her own back
than, ahe does of his peace and comfort.
The criminally extravagant wife Is,
however, a much rarer bird than is
generally believed. Ninety-nine times out
of a hundred when you see a woman
pending more money than she should
upon her clothes and living. It is because
her husband has kept her in Ignorance
of his financial affairs, and she does
not know where she stands on the
financial platform. No man could do
business without having any idea of what
Ills assets and income were, yet the
majority of women are expected to man
age their affairs thriftily when they
don't know whether they can afford
homespun or silk velvet.
Also a woman's extravagance Is quite
os often her husband's doing as her own.
Many a woman who goes about looking
like a perambulating jeweler's window
has really simple tastes herself, but her
husband likes to see her bedecked with
quarts of diamonds because she adver
tises to the general public his financial
nuccesa.
The money question in the family Is
one of the burning questions that will
probably never be settled this side of
the millennium. One of its curious fea
tures Is that the man who delights in
throwing his money around outside of the
home' is very frequently a tight wad In it.
He will spend X buying drinks for a lot
of barroom loafers and then have a fit
over his wife's extravagance because she
wants a $10 hat.
Why so many men should get pleasure
In spending their money on strangers,
and none on spending it on their own
families is one of the mysteries of human
nature that nobody can solve. Probably
In such a man's mind home comes to
stand only for duty. It's obligatory upon
him that he should buy his wife's clothes
and so he dues it with grur-.bling and mut
tering against her extravagance, while he
would Joyously pay out twice as much
for violets to send to some woman that
lie really doesn't Care as much about as
he does ills wife.
Another re-ason why men accuse women
of extravagance Is because the two sexes
spend their money for such different
things. Practically all of a woman's
money goes for clothes. Very little of It
goes for amusements or vices, whereas
a man spends comparatively little for
clothes and most of his money for
amusements and vices.
If any woman In ordinary circum
stances should ppend up m her clothes
as much money during the year as her
husband spends upon drinks and cigars
she i would, never hear the last of it.
Yet why le a l.'iO hat that lasts a season
more extravagant than a $00 Jag that
lasts only twenty-four hours?
I know a man who will never take his
wife to the theater, which she adores,
because he thinks It is a sinful waste
of money to pay $4 for a couple of hours'
amusement, but once or twice a week
he takes her to dinner at a restaurant
and spends twice that much for food.
There Is also a rather pathetic side to
the matter when you reflect that most
of women's extravagance in dress is the
result of their efforts to make them
selves more attractive in the eyes of the
men they love. A deep note in the
feminine psychology was struck In t lie
"Thief," when the author made the wife
even steal In order to appear as smart
and attractive to her husband as other
women did.
Of course, men proclaim that they like
simplicity in women's attire, and that
beauty unadorned is adorned the most
and so on, but women know this to be
fudge. They observe that the prettiest
dressed women get the most attention,
and that nun like to be seen out with
living fashion plates, and In their efforts
to please in one direction they fall Into
the pit in the other. To be well dressed
requires good cloth's, and good clothes
cost good money, and to spend the money
brings on the charge of extravagance.
What Is a poor woman to do?
Goodness knows, but It would be In
teresting to have some of the men who
are getting divorces on the ground of
thoir wives' extravagance file their own
bill of personal expenses along with their
complaints.
The Philosophy of Man
Dj-FRAXOKS
It happened in that glorious, undated
Iieriod. called "Once Upon a. Time." an
era when no one s brains were taxed to
remember the hour, the day, the week,
the month or the year; when heads were
not stuffed with dates arranged in time
table precision, and time sped along with
the charming Itideflniteness of a country
road that U without a mile post to mai
lt, that a man fell sick.
As also happens, so great U the solic
itude of woman, his wife noticed symp
toms of illness the first day, and took
prompt measures to cure him. fc'hc tried
simple home remedies cantor oil. mustard
platers, hot water bags and all those
tlrst alda to the old-fashioned and find
ing lie did not Improve sent for a doctor.
Wbea bo grew worF. she sent for two;
he sent the children away that they
might not bother him. and during the
even long weeks of his lllnens nursed
him patiently and tenderly, aiwaya
faithful, always encouraging, and always
inspiring blm with a hope fhe did not
always feel. The physlolana marveled at
her skill as a nurse, and said that no
patient ever had better care, but human
skill doesn't always avail, and he passed
away.
Bha had nothing to regret, but being a
woman fhe began from the hour be died
to rtrgret that she hadn't done more.
Perhaps If 1 had changed doctors
sooner;" "One night I dozed off and
ha nilmwd his medicine;" "If 1 had taken
htm away;" "If I had tried other reme
dies," and If she had only done this, or
thaty oha believed she might have saved
, hit . This was some time ago, we ran t
leljul when becauns of Hie indcflulte-
ness of things that happened Once Upon
a Time, but she still reproached herself.
Once upon a time a woman fell alt k,
and when, after keeping her complains
to herself for several days, after the man
ner of women, ahe told her husband'she
was 111, he told her it was all Imagination.
"You women," he atd, "have a way of
giving up to aches In order that you
may tall a doctor. Take a long walk out
of doors and forget It. Uo to the matinee
and you will come home cured."
For several weeks she kept up the best
she could, and then her mother Insisted
that she have a doctor.
"All imagination," said her husband,
but he called a doctor, and three days
later she gave up the fight.
"These things can't he helped," sa'd her
huoband on his way home from the
cemetery. "We must all go when our
turns come, and it was her turn to go."
True, he mUsed her sorely and grieved
for her, but there was no self-reproach
with his grief. "We all have to go when
our turns come," for the greatest philoso
phers in the world are widowers.
Ancient Facts
J
In 150) at Cremona, Italy, 12,000 books
printed in Hebrew were publicly burned
as heretical, simply on account of their
language. About IjOO, after (Jranuda,
Spain, had be-u captured from the Moors,
j.UuO uuplcs of the Koran were similarly
destroyed.
Leave That Woman Be!
By Tad
VOU'i-LFNPJVMpArHV tn THE. PfCTIOrV!
in TUP MIDDLt OF THE"
fAcy PUKI0U5 ANDFEKVD
---' . .
r ROS5-& AMlNATIOn ' .
Reno fcuTH in -silk hat
. laoovA; mvonce suit
n""-v- ,
THE COURT Dltnww-vn..-
4HC IN HIS rot-ucl I""
' IFGKS?l OPHONED
Wo ulDTg Typg vYRiTe RJ
OH VNAbNTT SHE- THE"
?00tSH &IRCTD8E" A
Ort J'rA A 0TTUE IN A
V4HAT A CINCH 'I 0rtx
4 (M IXE. M.0RM-
MSU.0 Olo0JiJAtrJfcKf
-T- 1 c C n M MITTJT2 WAS
kcANMING THE LlT
LO0KH UP C AU-EI THe
mm a ITETC OVETR AND
CM I R PED'ALPH 6 N"SC 1 1
'IF IfTAknAYAbD
OF FUET& KAKP A CATS
coat; how much I "5 i
rHEEE Iff A DOCjSPANR
UAMl THAT WOMAN PE!1
WF WERE ALL SEATED
A-ROUND-THE TABLE,
HOT A WORD WAS PKEf
F0TL FULty 5 MINUTES,
SODDENt-y THE
PL aw OPEN AMD
LTOHNT?OUTH RU5rD
IN ANb fffcABBJAO
rtArJ Aha HVTWEA6M
WHEN TncHOUbt Zti rtto
OH GERMAMV - OH GEKMANy
vHHV O0MTN0U ET
th. HoMct rrcTvev vf
cujArtTrte oto wm-ev
THEN piiA. POT.KH
THV I COME TACK
F-LL' IX Do"i GN V0 .
S5J
1LM
THfiN PEUVlCft. COAUTOt
TH6 MAr NEYT POOR
AT7 ITMctfwe. BoJJ'
(Croi ovTPojt. afid Come
p0VN TH J7AU-J- AHP
IW 1 I'M FintJH.Q.
oee M net-.
I A HfXPPvll jo Do Till. "
fUV ATCN0f?rW.:
,
The Fight Against Age
J
lly MA1UJA11KT II
Tou can never really etlmato the pow
ers of endurance of the so-called weaker
sex until you know what torture they
will undergo to be made beautiful.
I'sually when u woman sets out along
certain Hues to conquer old use or to
enhance her looks she sheds every par
ticle of common sense, both the natural
nd the acquired kind.
I happened In upon a friend who de
clines both to grow old or to allow
wrinkles to Hppear, and who wages her
battles against time with any and every
weapon suggested to her. I know she Is
near on to DO years, and she knows that I
know it, but In the ranks of the beauty
seekers your age la only spoken of In
your absence.
This time It was late In the afternoon,
llUIAItl) AVER.
possed to wear It at night, but I really
can't sleo when I have it on, so I wear
It during the day as often at possible.
You're always advocating the use of will
power and that sort of thing. Well,
you've no Idea how much will power It
takes to keep this dreadful thing on. It'a
Just torture!"
"Have you seen any results yetT"
"Well, no, to tell the truth. I'v onl;
been wearing it for six weeks. - Th
woman who Invented It said you oouhl
never tell how soon Improvement wrouM
show. It dejiends on th person. No,
she wasn't very pretty herself. In fact,
she wiui dreadfully fat and puffy looking,
I asked her why she didn't use her own
cap and get thinner (It reduces your
face, too), but she said the German Ideal
- I-
Sherlocko the Monk
.'" .A .t .
1st: ( ,
Copvrlgtit, 1311. National
Nwa AMiH'iatlon.
i tea li m w i. li ii ill
The Hair-Rasing Adventure on the Dock
- I THERE G06S 1- I , i
J SHEJUOCICJO PA$r -i
i I M MAI NEED wklj I 5HtRLOCK.O . ( 1' )
j i I'U. RUM OUT ANO T ' T k V
f ( 1" ) tR)VE TO THE-)
sHi4n " ? NOWOtt'. - ...i I CLOSE TO TOUR H-
rt w-3 Zjt l 5fv-ll MuRfc.aAAD
EACH OY HER FINQIilU WAS ENCASED IN STEEL."
my handsome friend wore a flowing and
very modish teagown over her tlghtly
laoed eorset. Around her neck was what
appeared to be a very tight dog collar
of book muslin and metal. The head was
covered by a small pointed cap, to which
were attachod several strips of muslin,
each with a large piece of shaped cork
beneath it. The cork pieces were placed
one over the forhead. two on each cheek,
one under each eye and one beneath the
chin.
Each piece of cork was attached to the
strips of muslin by means of a metal
clasp, and the muslin In turn fastened
tightly on to the headpiece by means of
an ordinary metal buckle.
Naturally aha could not speak, but she
waved her hand frantically, indicating
that khe would like some of the various
clasps unbuckled. Khe couldn't do It her
self, as each one of her ten fingers' tips
was held in a small cone-shaped vice of
steel, and when I came into the room she
was holding her hands up as if ahe were
going through some lurid tnoantatlnn.
Would you mind telling, nie what on
earth you are doing?" I asked, unfasten
ing some of the buckles.,
Bha gasped for breath and emerged
was fat. She said every German woman"
wanted to look like the statues of Oer- -mania.
Sheg fatter and bigger than our .,
liberty, and has even Ices figure. Thosr
things are a nyitter of national Ideal and-"
tradition. It's a nice, easy, comfortable ,
Ideal. I wish we American women felt "
that way about our1 figures because just ; '.
now I'm trying a new way of reducing '
and I can't walk or move without suf.
faring agony. It's a queer little ball with
a spring In It, and you wear It under ''
your corset. Ever time you stir or evert
breathe It gives you a kind of deep mas-'
sage. Very painful, but I'm aure It ought
to reduce you wonderfully. Don't yon
think It sounds very scientific? I'm sura
I never heard of anything like it before.- .
and you know I've tried every thing."
Indued she has. Tho steel .flnger-tlp
clasps are among her latest acquisitions. .
Kho ansures me tiiat they are maklntt,
her fingers mora pointed and shapely, ..
and nothing will make her believe U'
contrary, l'or a long time she cherished,
tho belief that If you stjiWeaed yur peck'
WTy firmly In a tlghtly-boncd collar it
would grow thin mid slender. She woro
collars that made the famous luntru-
ment of torture "the Iron Maiden" loo.c
cozy by comparison. The bones In he
"MY Kill END A HHorXTELY DE CLINE3 TO UUOW OLD.
pink and spluttering from her cori; and
inusllii tago.
"It's the very lutcst thing, directly
from IVrlln. Iou't ou think it's great?
I'm sure It will do my fuce no end of
good, It harts to when I weur It, and wo
all know that you have to suffer to be
beautiful, as dead Mine. Itoland said.
Uh! didn't fhe say that? Oh! yes, of
course. I ititiuinher now, 'Ileauly, what
crimes are committed In thy nunio.' That
was what he said. I always liked her
ho wore surh sweet caps."
!mg experience has taught me that tho
pumuit of beauty along eccentric lines
iiiakes the pursuer inuro and more
nightly, mentally ao. I merely suggested,
that the lady quoted had lout her head
and my friend seemed In the act of los
ing hers. he became quite Indignant.
"Not at all. This tiling is very highly
spoken of. The woman who sold If to in
said it would lift up tho sagging muscles
of the face, reduce a double chin, tone
up the cheeks, remove crowsfeet and
lines around this ees and make one per
fectly youu.' and radiant. You arj sup-
collars absolutely made the blood couio
At labt 13 1 it) riallzt-d that ihe had over- ..
done that kind of beautifying at least,
and she pay for her folly by having a
thin scrawny neck which must aiwaya
be hidden by a dog collar or velvet band "
of some kind. Hie belon; to the large '
class of woinun who believe that beauty
is acquired by slow torture only.
Him has rvn nuudrcds of miles on
treading machine to get thin, though . .
the lefuaes to walk an ordinary city
block. Her endurance in the pursuit cf
beauty amounts to heroism, ho does
her confidence in any one who advises
her to do anything, providing It's new
and startling enough.
And the very strangest thing of ail ,
Is that the doetn't look over thirty-five ,'
and when her name appears In the pa- '
pcrs It Is alwayi with the prefix, the
beautiful Mm. , for she choso her
parents with care, and they bequeathed
to her a fund of health. vitUlty. mug-' .
neiisui and enthusiasm which keeps tier
young despite the torture sue aiidiraa r
iu lUo pursuit ut beauty.
1