Omaha daily bee. (Omaha [Neb.]) 187?-1922, November 06, 1911, Image 11

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    LWtj M,!.: U.MAIIA. MONDAY. M J ,M IW'.li . i:m1.
"fh e e eg jn Ma(?a zirlP a
SILK HAT HARRY'S DIVORCE SUIT
The Judge Took In a Party
By Tad
CotvtftM, Kit. Natlmal News AasKtaUea.
THE FfUT HAUffwBTH
ci THE istMT JTL I MtET EM-
MMfe VNE fi-AW 11 THtJ 'tn
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rN NvttfT NUC AftOUH
MtTjwEu-twurN mo Bunk.
N-OCHN& I Si THE
rJTNOMAN NC (WEETi
CQypt.6 op pip Ks -OM-MO-0-
aueckth ah derTT) fej
ge
The Beauty of Woman
A Talk with August Rodin.
By GEOKOK
I'nUl suite recently Hotel Blron u
known ill the convent of Bacre Coeur -and
lately It has been made Into an apart
ment house n wh en Augusts itoain. ine
sculptor, live.
The great master hat studios at Men
don and In a Paris marble yard, but be
pretera his workrooms In Hotel Blron. .
It Is Indeed the most beautiful place
any artist might Imagine, The creator
of "The Thinker" here has some lsrge
very high halls with beautifully decora-ted
paneled ceilings. One of the rooms In
which he works Is circular In shape and
through Its large French windows you
look Into a, wonderful garden.
For years this garden haa been abso
lutely neglected, but among the tall grass
you may still see the rows of low box
wood hedges which once framed the
walks and, beneath the foliage of the
grapevines, you get a glimpse of iron
framework of old-time summer houses.
Every spring the beds In the lawns come
back to life and are filled with flowers.
Nothing Is more melancholy than to see
human work thus slowly destroyed by
nature.
Rodin spends nearly all h'.s time draw
Ing' in Hotel biron. In the quiet rooms
of the old convent be studies the beauty
of young women and reproduces their
harmonious outlines on paper with his
pencil.
"Where once young virgins were brought
up ty pious sisters, the . sculptor, now
adores the physical charms of womea
and surely there is no less piety In his
' ' - . 1 Att A I thtt
sisters in' bygone days.
One evening I was sitting with the mas
ter looking a,t a collection or nis araw
lngs and 1 admired the harmonious ara
besks with which he reproduced On paper
the various rhythms of the human body
The bold outlines of his sketches showed
the case and freedom of the movements
and the master had with his thumb noft
ened the features Of the model a, thus
rtinhnni7.ini- their beauty, to whloh hard
pencil lines could not do justice.
As he showed me his drawings, he saw
before his mind's eye the models he had
used and 'every moment he exclaimed:
"How wonderful the shoulders of that
woman are! This line Is of perfectly
ideal beauty 1 My drawing Is too clumsy.
1 have really tried, but here Is another
drawing from the same model.' It Is a
little better and still-" '
"Look at the wonderful charm of those
curves; it is of almost superhuman fc-race."
"And look at that! What admirably
curved outlines, and 'what splendid soft'
hess of the surface covering the musoles.
One Is tempted to kneel down la adora
tion." ,
The expression of his eyes showed that
he was lost In old memories; he was like
an oriental In Mahomet's garden.
"Master," I asked him, "is it always
easy for you to find beautiful models T"
Tes."
"Then beauty Is sot scares la our coun
try?" ' "No, I tell r."
' "And does it last long?"
"It quickly changes. I will not say
that a woman like a landscape Is con
tinually .chanting with the moving sun,
but the comparison Is almost true.
"The true youth, in which the body
Is still developing and full of grace in
every movement seems at the same time
to . dread and to call for love and this
phase of beauty lasts only a few months.
"Without thinking, the longings and
passions of love, quickly change the tis
sues' of the body and destroy, the outlines.
The girl becomes a woman, bar beauty Is
changed; It Is' still admirable, but less
pure." ....'.
"Don't rou think that antloue beauty
was greater than modern and tbst mod-1
How to Be
One of my friends writes me that she
l;an ccclded to dye her hair.
''I have thought It over, and see no
.reason why I should let myself get gray.
than I am, hasn't a gray hair In his head,
ar il people are commenting on the fact
I hot I' am getting white first. Do you
think dyeing the hair is dangerous?"
Men ato well as women have dyed their
hair since etu-llest historic times. The
mother of Rameses the Great la said to
V.ave set the fashion, and It is a style
ahlch. will continue until women become
perfectly Satisfied with the way nature
deals With them, which, believe me, will
be never.
There Is one thing about woman that
' snows In some respects. .' he . Is much
raver than man. The tragedy of the
' first gray hair does not make her pete
and weepy. She simply stains her hair
I and appears before the eye of her dis
cerning women friends with a heroism
worthy of the Old Guard. Che dyes, but
DKFREXE.
ern women ' are far Inferior to
those
Phidias used as modelsT"
"Not at all."
"But the beauty of the rtreek Venus T"
"The artists of that time had eyes to
see with, while artists of today are blind.
The Greek women were beautiful, but
their chief beauty was In ths mind of the
artist, who used them as models.
"There are today women who are ex
actly like them. The women of modern
Italy possess the very same Mediter
ranean type of beauty as the women of
Phidias. The most prominent character
of this type Is the broad shoulders and
hips."
"But did not the Invasions of the bar
barians into Italy destroy antique beauty
by Intermarriage?"
"No. Even if one ' supposes what Is
perhaps possible, that the barbarian
races were less beautiful than the Ro
mans, time- has wiped' out 'the defects by
the mixture. of races and again produced
the .old harmony of the original type. .
, ';When the, beautiful and ugly mix, the
beautiful always conquers In the end.
Through & divine ' law, nature always
comes back' -to the best, and always
strives toward perfection. ' ,
"Besides the Mediterranean type there
Is a northern type, to which many
French women as weir as the German and
Slav women belong. In this type the hips
are very broad, while the shoulders sre
narrower. It is this form of beauty you
see, for instance, in the nymphs of Jean
Uoajou, and In Venus In the painting of
"The Judgment of Paris" by Watteau Or
In Diana by Iloudoa. ' . '
."To -tell the truth all human figures
have their beauties. You -must only know 1
how to dlseover them. ......
' ' "With infinite pleasure T have drawn
little dsnctng girls from Cambodaha who
one came to Paris with- their ruler. '
"I have made' studies from' the Japan
ese actress Hanako. She had no fat at'
all. Her muscles stood' out firmly like
those of a fox terrier. Her tendons were
so strong that the joints to which they
were fastened were as big as the limbs
themselves. She was so strong that she
could stand on one leg as' long as I
wanted her to, stretching out the other at
a right angle. She seemed te be like a
tree rooted to the ground. . Her anatomy
was ' quite different from that of the
European woman, still . she . was very
beautiful." '.'.
A moment later he expressed a thought
that has occupied him very much:
"Beauty is everywhere; It Is always be
fore our eyes, but we do not: see it.
Beauty . is character and expression.
"In all nature nothing possesses more
character than the. human body. By its
strength or grace it calls forth the most
different Image. Very often It resembles
a flower,. the curve of the upper part of
the body resembles the stem, the smile of
the bosom or the head, ths brilliancy of
the hair resembles an open flower. Then
again the body may remind of a flexible
vine, a wand with graceful, bold curves.
"When I saw,' Odyesseus says to Nau
stcae, ' T thought I " saw once more a
palm who arises toward the sky In front
of the altar of Apollo at Detvs.' Or the
human body, bent backwards Is liks. a
spring, like a beautiful bow on which
Eros places his Invisible arrows. . ..
"Then again 4t is an urn. Very often I
have asked a model to sit down .on the
ground turning her back towards me. In
this position appears ths outline of the
back tapering toward the waist and
growing wider at ths hips, like a vase
of wonderful shape. The human body Is
first of all ths mirror of the soul,' and In
this lies Its greatest beauty.
"What we admire In the human body
Is even more than the outside form; ft
f la the Inner flame which seems to hin
through It." ' - ' ' '
Beautiful
does not surrender. . '
irowever,( to return to our dye pots. I(
you want to Stain your hair there are's
few things to' remember. First of all it
Is slavery for life,-for few women ever
stop once they have begun.
Then not all scalps will stand strong
dyes. Many people have a very send
the akin and the chemicals,-in them
selves often perfectly hsrmleas, of which
most dyes are composed, simply don't
sgres with these people, .Just ss others
cannot eat sea food or strawberries with
out bad effects; for Instance, or. become
very ill when they take quinine. Many
people oan't 'apply glycerine to their
faces without showing a bad looking
burn on their skin. It Is. Just so with
hair dyea Unfortunately you never can
tell whether you are Immune or not until
you try. -
Never dye your hair yourself If yea
can possibly; avoid It and never get any
dye but the very best. Home-made dyes
always will give your secret away.
One of the best ways to do In atalulng
la ttH
IT WAi I N PlOnT 0 P TM CAF4T
Ofi LA PA IN rKAil THAT AffNO
KVr Son OCN4N TO (tetiT NiTH
AC&-9 $UMT BeOjLft. TV1CN
AMOKCNTV 0 rAMcrCrS tTH
Tocfccr rHyvNe.Q CrOOOOK-
AITERHOom . SvDOETiLV
A MANvNirwouT 0 HfT CAr&
M A v W fV J"Mi i-4 tj- TOWARD TWCr
HEM '6U- net-DJ A.H0 HC
3AR.iCD It ?GlKA " PrlWHAT
POrtEjAVWAO'pipCO pADtw.'
rlGSAyJ JXDMAC IPTHC
KETTLE BCHLET) OVcTP- NAottO
THE MTWeH I(NC.
,SAY. I eA8pfiO AT0BF
ftcfn e.A. . . w.
rvr i nn ) Kir
JTANO ATJOOTM FgRBV
At 30 Am fur
THE. ICA AtflUNfi THE
Ar0 PwT
itujm
: ;Watso's
aH.come to
2
YES,
LQOK AT MT
SHIPS ?
I AM
i
r
c ...
JVCKt KIND Of Twe3
I CanMiesi vv I I
I H0SriTABtC TO A --- ;
SrEAUNO THE ,rVMlRAL'i
BOAT iHERtOCPtO MUST
EAR-op fH
ths hair a darker shade, especially when
It has turned gray, Is to separate a little
of the front hair and of that on the
temples well If It shows a few white
threads. Dye the rest but don't touch
this and your bslr will louk m ore natural
' ' 11 li4sffSBsSBBSMBa'
it......
-3
VOft-feeTrtNCr TO TUH.M liAtfc MS
rfrHvKic nro ro"-eAorr on
"MQJ ATTHC Jji rtwtt A.N0
IN TVa fLAtC A MO M 15
Pi?e Nevr5UT thc vNfitK-t
-ATtrB. Ht NNOItfi. OpN
HoJPiTXu r0 CaulimCt tvte
uaslir omrs. vn h 1 1 p etxht)
h HCT-caa.- JFATWO'
WHEELED CA8 ISwanJovs
AHYPIEOPLAhE.?
QliTlWfe FEMAtE CP
THIS 5peCiC5 ISMQrtE
OEAOW TV AH TVS MALC
CLtaHTMe frt-ASSES fit
o?THSVHOPOTrL65
?UT Trie CAACrATJsiCi
OUT on THE JTAriO CUE AH
COUNTE. Aso rvaiC Cp
THE SlOrtsi, TH&M AX PAV
Au-iKAvf to. 00 fjTO'
JSUUTKK iTOFf-. AT1A M
I PUT AU.TMS.jftFF AwAy
WN UE?TiU. J 30 A m
THA OUT
otmb C(ta-
ANQ QPB UP AC
AIM'
Adventure With the"
ADMIRAL, i
I DEDUCE FROM
THAT BOAT. THAT
XOU ARE SOiNy
ON BOARD TfcuV
PERMIT ME TO I
INTRODUCE MrSELFJ
.OS.WAlSO. THC
IFLAaSHjP
FAMOUS DETecTNE 'J
eisBsvsBssaBBt Mra I M
ACTION TO TH8
TMBFT OF THE
AT ONcb-t
BOAT I Mi&ieD
m TSip mitM
THB ADMIRAL
and softer around the facs. That la tbs
worst things shout dyed hair It makes ths
features look hsrd and sometimes al-
most coarse, for nature changes the color
of the pigments In trie skin to suit ths
change la the hair and while we can,'
A
Pop fcNMCDTHftyM0TiJr
MADfria. Boob J gated oton th
J"tACr6 H FuLU Vf ierW OP THE
Aupexce- otrof.& rne Acr
apoasjjcd rne caovmo
AviAiflr. " fiiLU HAWC THC
BOO0 UNOfft rAy poWiTP. H.CnQ
MINtjTE Hff VNOfUCcTD ON H rj
JoBjECTA MieiuTC O n TW(J
ANO TV CH U50ir4 6-MM SQvhKtL
(N THSTSVa AiO."Vov; CA.NNOT
CAK, -sOW CANNOT SfNi
THe 009 i-OOIteoof vnT IN A
twin vva&b-w voice Mi
viHm me piicorr auejr does
The tho i-OA.,
7MR0fi HM AN AnCHO2
HOTHtH
to oo nu.
uurAwivA.uw
If
CWTrtsM, JU. National
news. Aasooiaiion. .
Admiral
tCS DR.VATiO, And ip
TOU AI1LL WAIT A Few
Minutes 1 will return
AND TAKE TOU VNiru mc I
.... .
V6RT SIMFLH. VVATSO.-r-VJ '
wis-r. i iuu 4uejjJtO THAT I
THE AFFABLC ADMlRAU WAi
FOUMTLUfcHO, iNDuva-iNo.
Improve on nature we are generally less
thorough and pslnrtaklng than she la.
To those who want to change tVe
color of their hair 1 cannot lut repeat
Mr. I'unch'i famous sdvlce to the
about to be married. ''Uoa'L"
A LUtltW
4.
i 11
2 C
"
ii
n
PLAY I'l -i
Phases
v.
Bj ADA
ua call her Emily, though her name
might be all womankind and mankind. I
saw her this morning In such radiant
mood that I have chosen to always re
member her In ex-
actly thst mooo.
I know Emily
well. Therefore, I
have' not always
seen her as she was
this morning. Hers
is a mercurial na -ture.
Her spirits
are , addicted to
high upa and very
low downs. They
soorn commonplace
middle ground.
Bo rt Is that I
'A .
have seen Emily
v H
when the baro
meter had reached
Its lowest point I
have seen her so
enveloped In mental fog that I wanted
to run as fast and as far from her as I
could, for there Is not In all the category
of ills any thing more "catching" than
low spirits. Low spirits lengthen the facs
and paint the world Indigo. They extract
all the Joy from the heart of everything
They ,make the singing of birds a dirge
and the passing of busy persons In the
street a vast, endless, funeral possession
They breed a subtle, self-polson as deplet
ing and In time as deadly as' any noxious
drug sold us with warning of dark red
paper ah white skull, and cross bones
Not seldom have I seen Kmlly In this
mood, 'when she haJ dropped to It there
was no comforting her, for she resented
cheery counsel ss an Intrunlon, and re
ceived every suggestion that thlnge were
not as bad as they might be, or at any
rate ware susceptible of Improvement, as
something she must fiercely combat
found myself turning cowardlyv when
Kmlly's face was heavy and her eyes
brooding, . and much Inclined to escape
hey.
. I have seen her wben her spirits were
a little higher than this, but when they
burnt Into a violent criticism. Her friend
Jane- had sense or she would not have
lot her, engagement come such a cropper,
Brother John was an ass, eles he would
have made his business more profitable
and his wife less extravagant. Mary
was a false friend because iti hndn't
called for three weeks. What If It were
houset leanlng time. Mary could not pos
sibly be as busy as she, Emily, was, Is
and always wilt be. She could not tolerate
Busan because ' her speech wss affected
since she lias returned from the young
ladles' seminary. If you ars so bold as
to tell hfcr that Busan's speech Is correct
and that nothing should be regarded as
F
Little Bobbie's Pa
lly WILLIAM
Well, sed Pa last nlte, wen he wss reed
ing the paper,, well wire, wnai no jruu
think of thla, I wud like to Know t
What Is It? sed Ma.
This poem of Mister Klpllngs. sed Fa,
about the men & the ladles. look at It.
sed 1'a, look at It & aree with me that
Mister Kipling l the greatest singer
- . ... r ....i
nl in' e the rtays or uyron anu ona-n. u
at It, I ask.'
What In the world are you gltling so
exit tod about, sed Ma, lot ms see this
wutKlerful poem. I will reeslte It to you,
sd Ta, at least the first verse, it ssys:
Wen th lllminalayan peaeant sees a ne
. bear In his pride, '
Ills ahout will- ofirn chase thst bear
Hut the she-bear, thus accosted, rends
Iliti pt-aiiunt louin anu iih,
Kor the female of the species Is desdller
than the mule.
in,i,.iii I nlwavs aav the salni to you',
tied l'a, & dldetit I always say that Mla-
ter Kipling was a grate poet. I felt so
guod en I resd this, sed Fa, that I rote
two veraes like It cummlng up on the
aubuay. Mere they are. aid l'a:
Wen the men thut work like biases from
the morning till the nils
Gil oil the heme oiir' auuwsy they are
apt to lose their sits,
Uecauao the Indira' naiplns are sharpsi
than a nail
The femnle of the species Is deadlier than
the male. '
I knew a honest farmer onst. Wen 1 was
Me ''drank too much hard elder calm
hoem with to much ov.
His wife was walling In the door ft hit
him with a flail.
The ft-male of the species Is deadlier than
the male.
What wonderful Intelleck you have,
. . -
1
of Emily
rATTEItSON.
affected that Is correct you are over
whelmed in a flood of further criticisms.
or are beaten to earth by an angry atare.
From this you will oonrlude, that
Emily fs variable and not always agree
able.' Well, she Is human. But let me.
show you another phase of her. ' Thlv
morning she had burst the shell of self,
She had been busy for two weeks helping
a youtwr friend buy. her trousseau and
make plana for her wedding. Emily
eyes were bright. Her chin was upturned
and. as always, the upturned face Is more
attractive than the drooping one, and,
of more youthful appearance. Emily
looked ten' years younger. As she smiled
a cheerful selfless smile ten more years
fell away. Her voice had lost Its strident
strain. There were new toft notes In It.
Her mood warmed the hearts of all wha
met her as the rising sun warms a black!
landscape.
If ones mood was a frosen one. It
thawed under the spell of her happiness,
It one were joyous, the Joy was multi
plied. One basked In her mood, revelled
In it, felt that all was right In the sadly,
wagging old world, after all.
Reluctantly withdrawing from her presv
ence I thought that It I should neve
see Emily again It would be happiness tc
remember her as I saw her then, at he
best. But why not always remember hef
thus. I may meet her again, once, twenty,
a hundred times, and she may run the
gamut of her varying but always lntens
moods. But why not regard all ths
as temporary eclipses of the real
Emily whom I have but Just seen In he
clear radlancbt
Human beings, our brothers and sisters,
deserve the Justice we grant the moon.
When we speak of the moon we think ol
her at her best, swinging a serene, bril
liant globe across the calm- face of the
heavens. We have seen her. suddenlly
hiding behind clouds. We have seen an
Inconsiderable fraction of her make its
first curved swordlike appearance In the
sky. We have seen her a shapelena red
dish mass, " fading slowly into the far
horizon. 1 We have seen her utterly
eclipsed, have sought her with smoked
glasses. In vsln. Itut when we hear her
name we think of none of these fractional
or unworthy aspect of licr. The name
summons the vision of lier at her full
splendor, the moon unfretted by transi
ent circumstances, unscreened by pausing
clouds, the real moon.
8o It Is with those persons who walk
our way on the high road that Is llfs.
It us remember them when they have
passed, and try to regard them while
they walk beside us, at their best. For
these are tholr true selves, the most
real aspects of themselves.
J
1 K1KK
sed Ma, to be sure. It seems strange that
a man with yure branes cuddent cash
them In for a sou. The trubbel with yure
poetry, sed Ma, Is 'that you rite It In the
Hunway & then It goea Into the cellar.
Why doant you try , politics, or some
thing that means reddy munyT You was
newer cut out to earn yure living with a
pen or a tlperlter, unless, maybe, In sura
buHlness house.
I doant give up that eesy, sed Fa. I
am a panliunt man. I reellze that sum
uv thene fine days 1 am going to maik a
grate hit In llteratur. & untlj.that time,
cuius 1 shall newer give up trying. The
frniule of the speeds may be dedller than
the mule, l'a red, but It talks a man to
be game & reetuae to quit. .'
Yes, yes. ed Ma, 1 know. It talks a
man to be gunie, data It, and refuse to
null? My deer, liunlmnd, sed Ma, the only
time that a man refuses to quit U wen
sumbody says to him, Uoant you think
ypu iiave had muff for one nlte? Duant
you think yuu outcht to go hmiia? That
is the only time lie haa tlto curtuge ta
say No, said Ma. As for that poetry of
yuresMa sed, I can inulk up t verses
rite now without UHlng a pen or pulper.
Jest as good as yure versos. Lisaen, sed
Ma:
Wen a mm has worked like blaites front
the morning till the nlte
& then has pUyeil at blly-ards till the
East Is alreekwl Willi lite.
No wonder that Ida wife at tioam cas
maik him shake &-rtall
The fcemale of the specios Is gamer tha
the mule, i
That Is enuff, thst wtil do. sed Ta. I
doant care to hear the next verbe.