Omaha daily bee. (Omaha [Neb.]) 187?-1922, November 02, 1911, Page 13, Image 13

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    SILK HAT HARRY'S DIVORCE SUIT
fliTH An 0 ER.PR A TUFiVTRE l"'!' I
VNS&OTD A I , ( Iht M iN-E- I .
rft-E TMITX vWETK- (I HEJiE I'M NOR KINS-AV HEE r Aw SwALklHiV. ''ir v
SO 80REO AT HOM J hjW I Fin G-EICJ TO THE BONE TO me OrF.cEP SLFAnrncai. )
p IriN.NfrTOMAtfi&TH A o P-n i n 5- tiD I Sv-.-J
I ESOi .eCT ANO VtW JAmEA nickel.- t r '
I 1 5?sT ;, I v . ffB i-
Married Life the Second Year
Warren Objects to "Pussy Purrmew," but is Won Over
by Mer Wiles.
By MABEL HERBERT UUXEU.
Helen opened the door to a messen
ger boy with a covered basket.
"Mrs. Warren Curtis?" he asked.
Helen nodded.
"Sign here,
please."
"But what la It-"
I'm not expecting
anything."
" don't know,
ma'am," the boy
grinned. "I waa
told to handle It
mighty careful
that't all."
Before she oould
question him fur
ther he had gone.
As Helen took up
the basket there
was a curious
little sound fron
inside and then a
distinct "Meow."
Hurriedly she
loosened the cover,
J'
5
tiny gray
paw
reached up and then with a bound, a
fluffy little Persian kitten Jumped out.
For a moment it seemed bewildered, then
It ran "under the couch.
In the basket was a small envelope.
Helen tore it open: " TusBy Purr-mew'
for little Winifred Curtis." '
A kitten for Winifred! But who had
sent it? There was no name on the
card. Stooping down, Helen drew out
from under the couch the frightened
ball of fur and cuddled It lovingly.
"Oh, you dear little thing!"
The kitten purred and rubbed against
her. A tiny collar was around Its neck,
with a silver bangle on which was en
graved "Pussy Purr-mew."
"Pussy Purr-mew Pussy Purr-mew!"
Helen repeated it aloud. "What a dear
name for a kitten!"
Then she took it in to Winifred, who
v US yit&ymg wilii K Biliuil wuui y oiicvy
on rollers. At first she seemed afraid,
then with a gurgling laugh she put
out her hand and stroked Its soft fur.
But the kitten wus still shy, and It
Struggled away end ran under the bed.
Again Helen went back to the basket
and shook out a piece of pink canton
flannel that lay In the bottom, hoping to
find some clue as to who had sent it,
but there was none. Who could it have
been? Certainly none of Warren's peo
1 pie, for they disapproved of children hav
ing live pets.
"Delia," Helen nailed Into the kitchen,
"bring me a saucer of milk. There's a
Mitt klttnn fn harp thnt MftmeonA has
sent Winifred."
"A kitten!" Delia came to the door in
astonlshpient. "Oh, ain't It a purty one?"
"My, that long hair I ain't never seen
one like that."
he brought the milk and the kitten
lapped it up eagerly, and then proceedeC
to wash its paws and face with the grav
est kitten dlpnlty. Helen found a piece of
pale blue ribbon and tied a butterfly
bow on Its collar.
"Oh you dear, soft, fluffy, furry little
thing!" as she put the kitten on a chair
and adjusted the bow."
Hut could she keep it? Would Warren
let her? Hhe knew he had never ap
proved of pets In an apartment. It was a
very valuable kitten. Its long fur and
fluffv tall proclaimed that. And If she
couldn't keep It what would she do with
It? Since she did not know from whom II
came, she could not return it
Meanwhile the kitten went to sleep on
the chair, trusttuly unronai'lous of the
uncertainty of Its future
It was later than usual when Warren
came home, and Helen could see that he
was not In the best of humor. She had
fixed a box for the kitten In the nursery,
and now she shut It up in there, not want
ing him to see.lt until after he had had
his dinner, hoping then he would feel
more kindly inclined.
"Steven's a fool," ne declared, as he
watched Helen break open a large baked
potato and fix it up for him with butter,
talt and paprika. "You know I warned
him not to go into that Lewlson deal,
and now the bottom's dropped out of the
whole thing. Just as I said it would.
"And he lost what he put In It?" asked
Helen, pushing the potato toward him.
"Of course he lost what he put in
over five thousand." dlgtflng into the
potato with bis fork.
"Perhaps you'll want a little more
fcaprika. dear, that's stronBer than any
we've bad and I was afraid I'd get too
much."
"And now the wboio concern Is down
and out," he went on. Ignoring her com
ment. "And It starves them right they
were crooked from the start, and I told
Etevers so ait alotiK. See here, is this all
the bread you've got? Whst shout that
whole-wheat bread you ordered?"
"They d dn't deliver it today I don't
know wty. I'D phono them in the murn-biCT
J
'Well, if they don't deliver It promptly,
get It from some place that will. I'm
sick and tired of this French bread."
After dinner Warren settled down with
his papers by the reading lamp In the
sitting room.
Helen put Winifred to sleep and then
came out w.th her sewing, leavlnir the
nursery door open for the kitten to fol
low. She had resolved not to tell hhn,
but to let Pussy Purr-mew announce her
self. The kitten ran around the room, but so
noiselessly that Warren did not hear it,
and he went on reading wholly uncon
scious of the little Intruder.
At last with a yawn he flung the paper
to the floor. The kitten, which had curled
up on the edge of Helen's skirt gave a
quick bound and landed on the rustling
paper as It fell.
"Thunderatlon!"
The kitten gazed up at Warren coquet
tishly. Its little claws dug In the paper.
"Where did that come from?"
"Someone sent it to Winifred, dear, I
don't know who. It came by a messenger
boy. In a basket, but there was no name
only this card," rising and taking from
mantel the card that came with it.
" 'Pussy Purr-mew' to little Winifred
Curtis," (Warren read frowningly. "H'm!
Well you can t keep it here you know
that, don't you? An apartment's no place
for cats."
"But It's such a dear little thing, and
It would be so much company for Wini
fred," pleaded Helen. "I don't think It
would be any trouble. We might try It
for a while."
Here, to her amazement, the kitten
Jumped up on Warren's knee. And be
fore he recovered from his astonlshmsnt,
It had crawled up to his shoulder.
Muttering something Helen couldn't
hear, he took hold of It firmly by the
back of the neck and set it on the floor.
But almost Immediately it again Jumped
to his knee and again started to climb
up to his shoulder.
"Jove! You're a persistent little beg
gar!" But this time he stroked it be
fore putting it down.
Just then Helen was called out by
Del a, who wanted to know If she
should throw out what was left of the
parsnips and If the fruit was to go In the
Icebox or the pantry.
When she came back the kitten was
curled up on the chair beside Warren,
snuggling down so close that it was air
most hidden by a fold of his coat only Its
little head was visible, while Warren
was again reading the paper as though
unconscious of its presence.
Helen picked up her sewing and wisely
mado no comment. But she knew now
that the kitten might stay.
r
Proved
J
Tiie skipper was a man who had a good
opinion of himself and his notions. He
had pulled through stilprec, mutiny and
other perils of the deep, but he came a
cropper once. For one of his voyages
he bad shipped a boatswain's mate who
bore something of a reputation.
One day the skipper ordered him aloft
to examine a sail on the royal yard.
" 'Tain't safe, Cip'n!" pretested the
boatswain's mete; "the foot ropes lias
got to be fixed first."
"Do as I tell you!' 'thundered the cap
tain. "The foot ropes are all right. I
know they ar."
The man went up.
Five minutes luter he came tumbling
dow nthrough the rigging from the top
of the mast, a distance of over 100 feel.
With a bang he landed on the belly of
the mainstay and bounded Into one of
the canvas-covered boats.
The' sailors, thinking him dead, crowded
about him tn a circle.
To their amazement he sat up.
His eyes wandered vacantly auount un
til they rested on the leathery face of ten
skipper, when they lighted up with In
telllgence.
'Cupn, he said, slowly; "you was
mlBtaken about them foot-ropte."
r
Curious Facts
J
The New England Palladium of August
30, 1MJG. describe the killing of a large
rattlesnake With 73 rattles.
Margaret McMullen, who had been on
trial fur several days in New York for
being a common scold, was acquitted on
October 21, 113.
In Scotland a landlord gives his tenant
notice to vacate the premises by "chalk
Ing the door." It 14 done by a "burgu
officer" upon the verbal authority of the
Give Him One More Chance, Mr.
11 Ji u
0EX 5HI86 PE$ Ot THE ATTfLfT'Ci
.5TO0O IN THt CEHTEH OP TH.
ROOlA NlTX rHE. OOUfi-H t?AO
while arouho Hrw Aee rue
CHrVrfPiONS SNAIT7N6- FOR THCI.
SWAP-e OP THE JvNAtj 2BM WAS
GOINCr.T0(VA A iPEECH AtJu
HCKE rWNAdfe OF THAT P-ACT
Hli i-OOCS BACH CooG-HEO AND
THEN THROvVNt OUT Hli CHEAT
-51" Bovs, i no now vjhv
N H0 SUCH ACINCH- THE
ATM-ETCC rP Att-ANt A-N9
TX GfANTi COUt-OHT BEOET?
QUICK BAKJEK,
TH& B-ACK BAT.
HA-HA-8IU. IiR GOT
A OflCH Op A JOB -J'MVfUTH
A 0N& JllNCr
tmcu J THAT HAS A, TEXT
KNO ONE I'AA
0A.tjUER.TfCK.CT TSKS-P.
CAlMiS, and MOST
CVCPs TVW N Or TMATi
OP Awv IMPORTANCE
i &er uf at ru fimd
AN EMpTV LOT IN THE
HBH-tDvNN Kid TMC
JHOvn Put up TMETEnT-
Sherlocko
THE ADYENTURE OF THE SUSPECTED BARBER
'R. SHE.RLOCKO.I " I THE NIPPERS, NATS0tl I ( I'M A DETECTNE I 1 A 1-tXPe.CUD--',;
I HAV SOME SECREtU- V 7 J 4 I ARRE ST TOU ON AS Jrl, J? f t
FORMATION FOR XOVpS . ICHAROE OF H0MrCDG J com- 1
SH.-THE BARBER UU ) eVJ -COt4e'ENCg ' 1
OUR VILLAGE 4 aT J P fOMT N1AK.6 ME LAU&HJ 7 f
MURDERER C t?fUT lOI MAT CUT THIS GZl
VJE'U JUST BE Wj VCUfcTOMEIn ) f
time RtKer-K. S Bi-ra r " 1 I
ItT . Jr THE FEED T0UF0RSATIN4V5 DRUfl40,0P THE 'CENTRAU
NEiSHBoit, but ALFAifoT) jgffi c-T" " thn" HNwumipl Pharmact; told ne CT
THE HAT AND FEED J id'Hi? v ) THE eARBCDy HAIRcurtO SHOULD Be)
VIELL
AWf FACTi TO JU4T1FT "HOD I
I I kl rAk.l rVCkJilikue iiis-i m"
TALK
Dur
HAIRCLfTTO AS AJ
CRIMINAL
THK r.KK: OMAHA. TIU'RSPAY. NOYF.MUKIi J,
The Judge Is Wise
I NA$ D0P0
H 5TA6GF120
rXE EntPETJT 8ASn?A-(. SCtll$E
WHOJAiO TMATntE ATHLETIC
HAD NO EAPTHW CHANCd TO Vv'N
Sat at mi DDK tme oavaftex
TWEV HAD t3ae.E-2.EIO N ON
The cfN JTT2MP gee. how wi.
I STAfiT VW J7Z!tw H flPEP
I'M TH 0iOrG-e5T J003 irt TDWV
Ar-fP EVQWO P. if TE-i- rs &
AE 0. I'M LC0l'N0- fOfl.N OUT
&EH" HOW imiu. i Pi s 0 'T ?
0r fcor ir iU. i-TAPX i-iT
TMiS AviO h vNftcre -IFTHEV
cau- Philadelphia
THE. UNCori 5COU CiTV
NNMVT OO TXtrV tOCORAOO ?
GET VOOBTCrCtTS
r-oMvta Cjoncew aft-eh
V.ANIMP THE hops e,
OARiEu-TitlcEO, SEtxr
THE. AUOIENCfc., SCl-l.
pEAixoT J 00 A 8 ACE
BACK STZNT Ar0 ATTE.
twe Show, Puu-THt TEKT
OOWH PfttKlT IN THE"
TRAin ANO fit Hi
MAiLET.P VNlTHTKS- HOC J E .
Sri 12
the Monk
I DON'T LIKE TO IvVEU. ilft.TOU've
ABOUT A NCGH8GftJl SPfKADiNi. UNFAVCRABIE
T. . r . HI W f- Or irv a.. . '
vvjok. oN TELL TOU
7)'. " rc (MINGS v " .?icll
to Women Alright
THrj!-f.'J
TnO KiMOi
7
Cop. By Tad
THE. CApTAiN Ai
OOwM rue. JTARJ.
IT VW A VIILO MOKNiNCr I N THE
EXH4N CrC irEELW!
DOiNfr THE HlG-H AO J-OFTV
TUMMJUNO- ACT A IT (AM N&jh
Done befc.. & siocs
PoiHt For, the riceR in
de coisr-e-R. Cafe, betoh-c
GOinCj Fcji?TM ET- MAie&lN M ATT
SOT THcTRE Pin.iT WHATi V?
MATT TUBS Cdiero. VM44TDOS
ITJAV. IN A T?Ci 0 LN tj V0C
VATT 5A,0 Si-OWt-- .
C.'-'CA6rO 5A &T VMlCK-Et
Bur &E vNHl-2. VOL! OUGHT"
TO H7VR DAni AS COS
Y06-i7AV APTEri. SCHOOL .
SOOf2fc
T5 OOTILC
4
By Gus Mager
Coprrldit, nil. NtiouU
NawS Awutilsilon.
REEN
THAT FELLOW A BARfitu!
lir-l ...
LCOkT AT NY fuiu I L,r-
VOUciHT TO fcG IN SlNflT
111 1 I , II Il I
' I e . ' M . - :
age
j jjjjj
Funis cases
Onw
OF
'"I eMUO LILLlT I
MAO A PCU-OVi
UPBFFOKE (VH TH
MAOnT TAA-ETN Hli I
IFF. TO A ShOvA
5liM.e TVCV VNETlC ,
l.Tn-rrr rr J r l
:i i !;1 r ..v
1
Lend a
ny icLLA vhi
In the aparlnipnls and luuisrs of well to
do people In New York ninths ure destroy
ing enough half-worn clothing to make
glad the heni ts and homes of thousands
of poor pc'opli!.
There Is a free
kindergarten where
poor children are
being t u uk lit those
wonderful play-lessons
which give
them a foundation
of order and con
centration; and this
school Is very
thankful and glad
to obtain money
or clothing which
ran bo Utilized for
the children,
.Just now the sea
son of cold weather
Is facing these poor
families and thosn
who have enough heart and time to
think about them might do one of God s
errands by writing to Miss Knox, No,
13 Bt. James Place, Urooklyn, and find
ing out what will be of service to her.
We must all remember that clothing,
as well as food, Is much higher this
year than last, and the struggle for Ufa
grows harder each year In this greut
Manhattan metropolis.
And while we criticise the pnoplo who
cause the necessities ; to be high rrtced,
we must not forgot that we can do many
things to relieve the strain upon the
goor, especially tho little children who
are wholly blameless In the matter.
And we must not forget how many
splendid men and women are working for
little or nothing, trying to relieve the
suffering In the city.
The free klnderwnrtens are tauglit by
noble, sweet women, who receive barely
enough to give them the mere' n,eedg of
life.
Miss Knox cays of her school. In a pri
vate letter:
"We are situated in a very poor part of
Brooklyn, In the building of the Uttle
Mothers' Aid association. The mothers
mostly go out by the day to work, and
leave the children. In the care of the
'little mothers" or older sister. These
I
I
i
1
;te..:-
The American Boy
Liberty or Prison.
lly THOMAS
i.
Five thousand dollars was embezzled
by a young iron und dissipated I" high
living, lie confessed nffi received this
sentence from the Judge:
"You fli&ll slay at home nights. You
shall remain within the limits of tills
country. You shall not pluy billiards or
pool, froqtlf lit cafes o;' cliink iiituxicutllig
Ihjuor, and you shall go Immediately to
work and keep at it until you have paid
back every dollar you stole. Violate these
terms and you go to prison."
This has been referred to as a "novel"
sentence. It Is, however, one of the most
remarkable sentences ever pronouncd
upon a criminal. Ho Is described as en
American boy. 2 years old. The Judge
could have sentenced him to a prison
term, or he could, as he did, throw a life
preserver o him arid tell htm to put it
on and swim back to the ship of slate,
off which lie Jumped with another pas
senger's money.
What do you, American boy, think of
this sentence? Would It bo trtttc r for the
boy in tho long run, to go to prison say,
for a term of years, or get down to busi
ness at once and return, one by one,
the V.W0 he stole.
It is ugifced, I believe, that a prlwm
term is not always a successful form of
correction. Men rurcly return from prison
to society ss better citizens. The loss of
liberty breed liu'.rcd.
Hatred sciurs a man s nature und stimu
lates revenge. And tevenge Is a pour
asset for solving the problem of life.
A boy of twenty who goes to Jull for
twenty years bus lost practically all his
youth and young manhood yeais. lie u
taken away from bis country us ho
knows It and kept away su long thai
when lie. returns ho does not know It.
Worse still, It does not wunt to know
him. Ami worst of all he, returns with
out the skill to master the cuminou prob
lems of the new life ubout him.
These are dlHcouiagliig conditions.
The American boy riferied to ul the
beginning cf this ai'lh le U no l-es a ci-iiu-luul
because hi) has not actually to spend
a portion of Ills life In Jail. H U In thu
yeurw to come he Will do sevrru! i.iiior
Ulit thlhK.
He will re'U.
Il will fight the buttle of hfc and
Irani all about it; oiluiui-c hu cumin
icwsy.
I'np'ljM. 1I! I, .'1trwil S
in
I N How FUNNV
lN Ml-uA -
I II IV ' '
V;Si
Hand
J
i;m:u wilcox.
girls are taught how to sew, cook and
have a happy lime after school hours.
"In order to help the families the osso
rlntinn serve a hot lunch nt noon for '
tho kindergarten pupils, and in some cakes "
they remain until S o'clock.
Our kindergarten Is supported entirely ;
by subscriptions, and soma years we have "
had more money, but this year thpre I .
need of great financial help, as some of,'
the subscribers have left the city and
taken up Interests In the new places.
"The unnual dues are HO. but we are
very grateful for any Interest, whether In
doming or minis.
Free kindergartens In these congested ' '
districts ere preventive of crime late
on.
Whatever a small child learns of systerrr H
and order before It Is 10 years of age Is
an unti-toxln fur crime.
A prison warden once suld that if he"'
could hnvo had all the men in his prison,, .;
illlili nicy vtf-rv iv yt'lllB ui BKe, SIO onBa .
mrmild hnv lin.m tVwir .1 w Ua h.ilnni ".'
the first ten years of life were the cruclOL.
years. It may be argued that many men-"
and women of refined and cultivated:?
families become criminals. 'J.
Hut refinement and cultivation anii,,f
wciUh do not always produce common-
snsa parents. '"
On the contrary, too often the fathe"
and mother leave the education of their,1,,
small children to servants and governesses
Hnd make no personal -effort to discover''
in JuKt what direction the minds of thelr'j
offspring are turned. '-"i-
The poor child, given the advantage'"
of a free kindergarten training, stands
a hotter chance to Imbibe good normal, ,
healthful Ideas of life than the children.,,
of luxury.
itnr w innnr inn K nfii.rirn n An lnonn
children have nothing but the association.;,
of the street nnd the slums to leave an.'
IliUTTiiuiv ilia, n u)vii .,,1. im7i!i, ....
There are may rrltlclHins to he mado
upon our public, schools. Hut the kinder-
garten system Is ono of tho most beautl-' -ful
things over brought to pur shores.
And our free kindergartens are better
than all tho Sunday schools of earth, to "
I ...... 1 1 1 . 1 .. ....... Ir II...... t V. . . I nl.alln n.ln.1.
lend little children In right paths.
Ind ft hand. Copyright. 1311. by the
New York Amcrlcan-Journal-Kxamlner.
J
TAITHIt.
lie. will begin to build a character for
himself. '
Hy tho rules of the game, set by the;
judge, the boy Is insured aulns. a tljfi
usual foims of tulf-destructlon. ' '' '
Ho can sentence himself yet. If he is a'
coward. That is, he can violate the rules
and go to prison if he prefers It. '
I lmuglue that every American boy who
reads the wordi of the J'ulgo will say;
"That 1 a great sentence.' i
And they will aree thut this unfortu
nate young American Is really fortunate,
considering the circumntnnces.
What, then, la there in it for tho
American Hoy, ut large, besides his
feeling of admiration for the Judge?
There is this in it:
I.ct every American Hoy pass the
sumo sentence on hlniHclf.
What will be the result, not In . t'.ie
limited sense of the sentence, but In
spirit?
1. You will be true to your home.
2 You will be true to the "limits of .
your country;" that i you will be Amer-.'
lean Hey ot fixed abode instead of ft .
wanderer.
J. j ou w ill noi waste umo m uic ui- r.
terly foolish things of life. -
i. You will keep nut of unwholesome
plUCCN.
6. You will never unfit yourself for -"puymg
back" by being lutoxtcuted. ' .
ti. You will keep at wurk.
1. As for the. S-'.'H, or any other sum, "
you will i;i t, not to pay buck to unoihcr .'
inuii, but to Ke. p for your ow u prese nt ':;
protection mill future cointort.
8. And, luxtly. If ou do not care lo
do these seven things, you will go to.,
prl.soii, not to the .ing Sing kind of
prison, but to a f ir Worse tine. To t'i
prison of llfo thut Is limited, or destroyed,
by lioinelesi ncss, bud habits, waste of ",
tlnio and Idleness.
t.'eitulnly It Is u great sentence. '.
lAt every American Hoy pass tho same :.
sentence upon himself.
Indelicacy of mentioning the ae of
women is not a modern notion. Womt ti-
are referred to in -largo numbers In the .
Old Testament. Vet there is only one :
Hen all. Ab.-aiium's wife) whose ago is re- '
corded. ,
live a
tultaldi;
hint to tlm m;:n
the, thill, bvilu.
'of sense, iul
"(if!
wm
I house owner.
'e.
t