Omaha daily bee. (Omaha [Neb.]) 187?-1922, November 14, 1909, EDITORIAL, Page 6, Image 14

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THK OMAHA SUNDAY HKK: NOVEMBER 14, 1909.
Gossip About Plays, Players and Playhouses
At the Omaha Theaters
Dustin Farnum Will Play "Cameo Kirby" Three Nights at Burwood,
Followed by "The Ringmaster" Boyd Offeri Evani Minstreli and
Musical Comedy Cressy at Orpheum and Ward and Yokes at Krug.
ANT an ctrrn of the violently
motional kind might profit
ably go to school to Miss Helen
Wfl- .nrl not nnlv Vi,wn
M
v. i r if
M . . . . . . . 1
omn or inf tagr v no Dark
and bit" furniture could learn
from the srtlng of the lending nornan In
''The Third Degree" company, but many
othera. f
When the curtain dropped at the end of
the fourth ret at the Hoyd last night there
feontlnd'd what ha been to date Hie nio't
successful engagement of the season here.
Not the bent play we have seen nor shall
e, because Mr. Klein's drama, while a
popular success, has several faults, but
because the play wan good enough despite
this to furnish a good o;portunliy . for
Miss Ware aud her fellow players.
Where Mr. Klein was strong there she
shone and where he was weak sire came
to the recue. This was notable In the
fourih act, whlrh when writing Mr. Klein
must have had brain fag. so far does It
drop below the level of the second and
third acts, and particularly the second,
which is far and away the best constructed
and best written of the play. The weak
ness of the fourth act was felt by many
uren these not at all versed In the technic
of play building.
Miss Ware Is said k be at her best In
depicting the elemental moods of an ele
mental woman and In such a character
he, of course, appeared In "The Third
Degree." Satisfactory, at least, she would
be In a part of far different kind, because
her guccess in due, In the first place, not
to temperament, personal charm or any
thing, but a knowledge of the methods
of acting. Those other, qualities she Is
not without, but her chief reliance Is on a
surer bade.
There haa recently been shown on the
lage, though not as yet locally, how sig
nally mere personal attractiveness fails
whn the player . thus .only . endowed Is
calltd upon to act. A matinee hero, manly
of presence and hand's ome of face and fig
ure, has been called upon to play some
thing else than himself and the resul; is
doleful in the extreme. It Is worth noting
In this connection that Faversham, who
has been fighting hard to make an impres
sion as something else limn the- idol of
the caramel contingent, has at length suc
cetded, his acting In "Herod" having
within a few days received the praise of
the best critics. His effort to get away
from romaniic drama or romantic drivel,
as you prefer, has been a great success.
The acting of another character In "The
Third Degree" furnished an amusing dis
covery as to how far many theatergoer
can go In discriminating between the actor
and the part. Countless Jokes about the
hissing of the heavy villain have led nearly
every half-intelligent spectator to reallxe
her that a bad, bad man may be quite
well played, and the player Is sometimes
at Itaat accorded his due. '
But this Is as far as it goes. Malcolm
Duncan played the part of Howard Jef
fries, Jr., a weak, vacillating youth, weak
to the point of despisal. If one may coin
the word. Mr. Duncan waa easily the
second best player In the company, but a
consideiable number voted him poor.
These do not like the character; that is
all. i,
The same people rather thought that the
player of Richard Brewster, the lawyer,
waa as good a they deemed Duncan poor.
Their Judgment, If the mental process may
be so dignified, was qutse as erroneous
In this case, although inversely directed.
The part of the attorney was the easiest
to enact of any In the play save that of
the quite impossible father, and, while
James Seeley did well with it, more might
have been attained. -
Tha play served to confirm previous opin
ions about the limitations of its author.
Mr. Klein's chief strength lies In building
up aome good situations and his dialogue
Is meritorious. He Is not strikingly
original even on a commonplace theme and
when he tackles a really tough subject,
as In "The Daughters of Men," he fails
utterly. But he can please the majority
and his "Third Degree" Is likely to laat
nearly aa long aa "Tha Music Master" or
"The Lion and tha Mouse."
Aa respect attendance at Omaha thea
ters tha last week. It waa a satisfactory
on for most houses. The Klein play did
quite well and also "Tha Man From Home"
at the Burwood. although on a second
visit. "Three Weeks" did not have many,
but a good many mora than deserved.
Whether acting or play waa worse la hard
to decide. The Ofpheum did as usual, and
that Is to aay It sold out practically all
the time and the Krug did well with "The
Cowboy ClrU"
FLAYBILXS FOH TUB WEEK.
1. 1st mt Attractions to Be Seen at Yarl-
Omaha Theaters.
"Tha Ringmaster, said to have regis
tered the first success of the present season
In New York, comes here direct from Its
run at Maxlna Elliott's theater next Thurs
day, Friday and Saturday at the Burwood
with the original cast and production.
While there have been many plays dealing
with financial affairs. It remained for Olive
Porter, for years a stock actress and later
a stenographer In an insurance office In
Wall street, to bring forward a dram a
v.Hch told not only a story technically
correct a to the affaire of tha street, but
ne so Interesting and poignant as to hold
the attention from the beginning to the end
of the atory. John La Baron, whose father
had a reputation mora for astuteness than
honesty, prefera a lire of ease abroad to
that of speculation. II loves Eleanor, the
daughter of Richard Hillary, known as
tha "Ringmaster" of Wall etreet. She
endeavors to persuade Lo Baron to give
up his dilettante existerce and begin a
Ufa of activity on 'change, lie does bo
and at once becomes Involved In a struggle
with tha girl father, who wishes to create
a copper trust, the formHton Including In
lta program tha ruin of a smaller company.
In the working out of this theme a num
ber of strong situations are created.
The Cohan A Harris minstrels, an or
ganisation conceived and promoted by
Uaorg M. Cohan, will be the attraction
at Boyd' theater tha last three night of
tha current week, with matinee Saturday.
Tha organisation, which comprises nearly
19 people, Is headed by George Evana,
familiarly known to theater-goers as "The
Honey Boy," from his author. hip of on
of our best known popular songs entitled
"I'll Be Tru t My Honey-Boy." More
tbaa th usual interest Is manifested In
tha engagement of minstrel ehoa In
Omaha haa been apparent over the en
gagement of this company, due, no doubt,
to the fact that Ueorg M. Cohan la re
sponsible for tha entertainment from It
first part, entitled "The Crlmn Trellis"
to It concluding feature The Firemen'
. umn ct itarrtn minstrel en
teriatnment, has been "written" and pro
duced under the personal supervision of
this prolific writer of musical successes.
It contain all the atmosphere, liveliness
and briskness of the characteristic Cohan
musical comedy. There Is action every
moment from the rise of the curtain un
til lis fall. Mr. Cohan has devised a new
entertainment In minstrel production, and
Iran given to the strigfl what In reputed to
be Its biggest and most pretentious mlnn
trel performance. The old time vaudeville
features have been eliminated from the
program, and have been substituted with
ennembie numbers characteristic of the
Cohan musical shows. At the same time
there In strict adherence to all that mins
trelsy Implies, with characteristic sketches
of vcenes In the southland and termina
tion of a one-act musical minstrel comedy
entitled "The Firemen's Picnic." The first
scene is entitled "The Crimson Trellis."
snd It has been pronounced one of the
most mammoth and beautiful scenic con
ceptions the stage has ever witnessed.
In the semi-circle will be seen such well
known comedians an John King. Harry
Van Foneen, Earl Renham and Sam Dee.
while the vocal contingent has for its
principal star singers John Rogers. Voughn
Comfort and Will Onkland. three minstrel
vocalists, who have gained much renown
and reputation, and are considered among
the very best singers on the vaudeville
or minstrel stage.
At the Boyd Tuesday and Wednesday
John Cort will present for the first time
In thl city the new college girl comedy.
"Commencement Day." the Joint work of
Virginia Frame and Margaret May.
There seems to be the best of Intrinsic
reasons why this play has won excep
tional approval. Two of these are that It
Is native in locale and novel in charac
terization. While the college boy has ben
fittingly and remuneratively exploited on
the stage, the college girl Iras been no
gjecjed, . Virginia .Frame, who Is said to
have cleverly limned the types that
abound in "Commencement Days," has
been fortunate In the collaboration of Mar
garet Mayo, a mistress of stage technique.
But Miss Frame good fortune has not
ended there; she has won tho Invaluable
advantage of Interesting a progressive and
liberal movement. John Cort. possessed of
means, the diapositlon and the discrimina
tion necessary, has given to "Commence
ment Day" a production- that in both
handsome and correct, and a cant of dis
tinctive merit, the latter including Fred
erick V. Bower, the celebrated singer,
comedian and ong writer; Grace Hopkins,
Willard Louis. H. A. Morey. F.dmund Mor
timer, E. V. O'Connor, Albert Roberts,
Amy Dale. Leila Smith, Catherine Carter,
Elizabeth Van Snell, "Tip" Smith and Oli
vette Haines. The company totalB fifty
people, of whom thirty are girls. Two
baggage cars of acenery are carried. A
special Wednesday matinee will be given.
Eugene Walter's celebrated play, "Paid
in Full," will be at the Boyd Sunday and
Monday. It I a play which many aay It Is
a duty to see. People owe It to themselves
to keep abreast of the time In matters
artlstio and literary, and of these the
drama Is no mall part. In seeing this
play there Is a happy combination of duty
Ano and pleasure derived, for "Paid In
Full" Is entertaining to an exceptional de
gree. It I a vital story of modern Amer
ica, and though It scenes are In New
York they might with equal fitness be laid
lr any American city. It is a real and
faithful picture of the world about and
It eeem as If the author had picked up a
home and it occupants from one' own
neighborhood and put them down on tho
etage that the public might behold them.
The cast sent here comes with a New York
repuiauon, where the play ran for
years.
two
A stellar attraction comes to the Burwood
Monday. Tuesday and Wednesday, when
Dustin Farnum appear for the first time
In this city in the new Tarkington and
Wilson drama of life In Louisiana in the
early thirties. "Cameo Klrby." Whatever
Mr. Farnum ha done ha alway been
tamped with the mark of an artlt, and
It haa been regretted that of late years he
ha not had a play that offered him a
good chance to prove "The Virginian" and
"The Squaw Man" are not the only type
that he can portray. .
That this new vehicle from the pen of
the author of "The Man from Home" ha
given him the long-sought-for opportunity
is fully attested by the praise showered
upon him. It Is structurally an excellent
play, full of Incident and action, with here
and there a bit of pathos, and the name
' Adrienne Lecouvreur
D R I E N N E LECOUVREUR,
A
around whom the greatest
glories of the greatest theater
In the world, the Comedy Fran
caise. Is written, was born in
1692, In a little village near
I'aili.
a poor
Her father. Robert Couvreur,
village hatter, moved to Parla in
1W. Educated under miserable conditions,
without the slightest contact of any kind
with art that she conceived a desire and
acquired abilities to Interpret the refined
poetry of the old French dramatists. Is
only another strange story that ore meet
In seeking out the way or genius.
At the age of 13, thl wonderful child
astonished Parisians as a membfr of an
amateur troupe by her recitals of Cor
nellle'a verses and as Pauline in ':Po!y
eucte," displaying a new method of de
livery, unlike tire character of declamation
so prevalent at that time. Adrienne had
an aunt who was laundress and amoug
her customer was La Grand, a aooletUre
of the Coniedie PiaMuaue. I.e Grand was
an indifferent actor, but a clever atrd orig
inal character. Through the patronage of
the Daughin, the eon of Louis XIV. lie
wa given a position wrtlr the theater,
writing light comic play, none of which,
however, survived hlin. but at the time,
attained considerable popularity at this
theater. Le Grand, however bad he may
have been as an actor, was gtod as a
teacher, and through the intercession of
the lauudress, the little Adrienne was
placed In hi charge, and through hi In
struction., which wa most Intelligent and
mot effective, succeeded In eromoting the
development of the child.
At the age of M, Le Grand mad her re
hear before the widow From pre, a well
known actreaa of her time, who waa Jut
about to undertake the leadership of the
tneater tn Lille. So pleased was Urn
rrotnpre with the clever novice that she
wa engaged at once, and ta Lille, Adrienne
part fits Mr. Farntint like a glove. The
stsr haa been guiltless of the practice or
some star s surrounding themselves with
an Inferior company In order that their own
merit may be magnified by comparison.
In the npleuolil parts provided by the
authors. May Buckley, MrKee Rankin,
Maud Hosford. Donald Oallaher. Gordon
Johnstone, Richard Pitman. George W.
Deyo. Ruth I,lovd and Norah Shelby have
added materially to their already consider- .
able reputations. The company Is easily I
one of the strongest of the season, many!
.'of the minor parts, also, being In the hands j
'of well-known people. Llebler A Co. are.
rpHOntiallil m tnr fhn rtrr,H 1 1 nn.1 mm IIia '
time and place offer unusual opportunities
for effective staging, much can be expected
from thin enterprising firm of managers.
The play has been staved under the super
vision of Hugh Ford and the authors.
Matinee Wednesday.
.
"The Little Homestead." a play by W. H.
fatten, tells a touching rtory of human
Interest a story with a moral forcibly told
and beautiful In Its pathos. It appeals to
the finer sensibilities, raises the emotions
of Indignation, sorrow, pity and makes for
righteousness triumphant. It in a storv
which makes one better for the knowing
and Is a tale of dramatic force ttiid virility
In which interest Is heightened by every
word, every situation.
With it realistic settings and capable
Interpretation Dy an unusually talented
compa-ny, the story of 'The Little Home
stead" goes straight to the heart. It will
be the attraction at the Burwood this aft
ernoon and evening only.
William Macauley will appear in the lead
ing part. He is well remembered here for
bin acting in "The Minister's How" and
"When We Were Friends." Miss Leasing,
formerly leading woman of the Burwood
rStock company, Is with the attraction.
A musical attraction of merit and one
which lia.i already made a reputation Is
"Little Johnny Jones." which may be seen
at the Krug theater for two days only,
commercing Sunday, November 14. Few
musical plays produced for many seasons
past have been more widely talked about
and no music has been more widely sung
or is mote familiar to every household in
the country than the melodies of "Little
Johnny Jones." The play Is In three acts
and four scenes, the scenery for which is
said to be massive and realistic.
The pleasant ' announcement comes from
the Orpheum that the special engagement
of Will M. Creasy and, Blanche Dnyne Is
to bo extended throughout this week and
another one-act playlet will be presented
by them. This will be "Bill Biffin's Baby."
In writing this Mr. Cressy has put more
quaint drollery and laughable comedy than
Into any of the other sketches he Is giv
ing this season. Experts In the "acropanto
mlinlo" art are the members of the Willy
Fantasr company, which can always be
depended upon to do something new and
out of the ordinary.
An act direct from Europe is that of
B.Tg's Six Merry Girls. Skill as musi
cians, gtace as dancers and vocal expres
siveness combine to make them extremely
acceptable. The Doherty Sisters call them
selves "the ginger girls," a phrase which
amused the English and puzzled the Ger
mans, but in America Is an augury of an
act that has a spicy dash and palatable
tang. Patsy Doyle, a monologlst, tell
no "old ones" and his remarks have a
humor of decided originality.
The Thalia quartet Is an organisation
Immensely euccessful In Europe. The four
entered upon vaudeville work six year ago
in Newcastle, England. Ck and Stevens
have an act In which one of them imper
sonates a Chinaman and the other a negro.
The dialogue Is exceptionally funny. The
klnodrome will again project the latest of
motion picture and the Orpheum concert
oichestra will play several high class se
lections. j $
Next Sunday matinee and evening will
be filled at the Burwood by the De Vault
Y'lddlhh opera company, including the old
est Yiddish actor on the stage, Moses 811
berrnan. who is as well known In Euro
pean countries as in the United States.
Mme. De Wolf, who has been likened to
Bertha Kallah, is also with the organiza
tion. Sunday afternoon the company will
sing "The Jewess" and In the evening "The
Daughter of Jerusalem." The performances
will be given in the Yiddish language.
f
Ward atrd Vokes will again present "The
Promoters" at the Krug for five days,
star.lng Tuesday, November 16, and
though the same title I retained it will
be found that they have made a prac
tically new offering In this big second edi
tion of their laat season's sucoes. Their
company is one of sixty people and again
presents Lucy Daly as the woman detec
tive. Lew Kelly a Prof. Dope, Charle
(Sandy) Chapman as the "fagged out" hotel
porter, Eddie Judge aa Casey, the dog, John
Munley as the bell boy and all of last
year'a cast of principals. It cannot be
promised that the pretty girl contingent
1 the aame a last year, but It is guaran
teed that this Important adjunct Is a fea
ture ct the big company. The Ward and
Vokes ladles' band Is also retained this
year.
Lecouvreur made her debut In 1708. The
young girl gained Immediate success and
by her original talents and fresh beauty,
it was but a short time before she became
the leading actress In the provinces. After
nine years, traveling about in the country,
she attained, the position of leading actress
In Stra.burg, which possessed one of the
finest provincial theater.
Had It not been for a serious trouble
caused by an unfortunate love affair which
drove her away, it is a question whether
he would have ever gone to Pari. The
faithlessness of Count de Klinglln, who
offered her marriage and then forsook her
to marry a lady of hi own rank, was the
turning point In the career of the girl who
was to become the greatest actress, not
alone In her own time, but of centuries to
come, and also a turning point In the his
tory of the Comedle Francal.se.
It' was Adrienne Lecouvreur s independent
art that opened the eyes of the public to
the empty mannerisms of the old school.
For thirteen years tn Paris she wa the
Idol of ri '.i atrd poor alike. Although she
fought atiin t Intrigues Instigated by less
tnlmted associates, still with her groat in
tellectuality and unquestioned art she was
apritclatpd by the bent men and women
of he r time. . The new elenrent which
Adrienne Lecouvreur Infused Into dramatic
art wa Ju.n whut it had lacked for many
year, and which may be expressed In tire
one word soul.
A contemporary gives the following
graphic description of her art: "fche never
appeared on the stage without seeming to
be penetrated by her part. Her eyes told
you what she wa going to say; her fear,
her anxiety, were pictured In her face. The
spectator yielded himself up to all her
emotion; he waa a, deeply stirred, a
overcome, a she. He feared, walled, trem
bled with her, nay. hi tear dropped be
fore her. This is not aurprlslng at all for
you saw aothtng in her which did not seem
reel and genuine. It waa her emotion, her
voice which spoke to y I
New Theater Opens
Brilliant Company, Headed by Julia, Marlowe and E. H. Sothern, Give
Firit Public Performance in Playhouse Unique in High Object and
for Which Hope for Itt Future if Great in Hearti of Its Promoters.
1TH the best wishes of every
thoughtful person the New
theater ban begttn Its career.
That thin nrny be long and bril
liant Is earnestly desired and
the wlnh la not without some
w
r3SS
prnmls
of fulfillment. The New theater
will have
many problem rather unusual
and vexatious aome of them but so far It
I. an succeeded In "making stepping stones
out or its stumbling blocks."
"Antony and Cleopatra'' was i-Ihwh ror
the opening play and It was enacted by
a brilliant cant headed by Sothern and
Julie Marlowe. Concerning their actlnr;
that Is probably a qtrite fair criticism Is
given here from the New York Sun:
"Mins Julia Marlowe and K. H. Sothern
were well entitled to the honor of inr
priieonatlng the ' chief characters of the
opening play. There In no actress in any
Mt glinh speaking country at present cap
able or disputing Miss Marlow's preemi
nences In the field of classic drama. Her
hlRtrlonle power, her dramatic imagina
tion, her peerless voice, her personal
beauty, are known an far as the stage Is
known, and the present In no time to
descant upon them at length. All these
qualities were In evidence In her embodi
ment of Cleopatra, though the. difficulties
with the acoustics of the theater (tempo
rary. It Is to be hoped) were handicaps
which she occasionally failed to surmount.
Of course, the composition of so com
plex a character is not a thing to be per
fected in one performance or In a doxen,
and It Is certain that Miss Marlowe's
embodiment will grow In variety and ripen
In power with successive representations,
yet it seems unlikely that the character
of Eygpt'a queen will ever be accounted '
one of the greatest of the Impersonations
or ths actress. A a matter of course. It
has its big- moments. Such a one Is the
death of tha queen from the bite of the
asp. Here le fell the true surge of tragic
power full of tremendous stillness. An
other is the outpouring of the qupen's
wrath upon the bearer of bad news. The
leest satisfactory side of the Impersona
tion is exhibited In the love Bcenes with
Antony. Here the overwhelming flood of
physical passion must be In evidence or
the result that follow it as effect from
cause lose half their power of conviction.
That flood does not overwhelm In Miss
AMVSEMESfTS.
rYrMLE
THE BUCKLE OF OMAHA'S AMUSEMENT BELT
rrriTTi
TP WILLIAM MACAULEY
IH
II li I i I I "the JTsw Version of
II 1 1 M M I MU B1 Buooeaaful
At that Ton AU Will
WEE
Company
I01ESTEMQ) ?
ENTIRE ORCH., SOc;
I
I TOr.lORROU,
America Foreaiest
-..Romantic Aclr..
In the Hew Oostnm Flay of Iov and AdTentnre la Old Xioulalana,
(gHI KOKUY
By Booth Tarkington and Harry fceon Wilton. Author of "The Kan T?om low."
Management o XWbler fc Co.
tT Mr. rarnum Baa the Admittedly Beat Supporting Company In the Country.
EVGS., 25c to 51.50-WED. MAT., Seats T5o & $1.00
3 NIGHTS K
I
AM.
s. a uc sauEur,
lac.. Present
RINGMASTER
AW AKZBIOAST FLAT BT OIITB POXTZB.
BZBSCT HON TXB MAXXVB IUIOTT T1Z&TIB, STBW TOBK CXTT.
EVGS., 25o to $I.50.8AT. MAT., Seat 75o & $1.00
Bub. Mat. and Might, Wot. gl D.Yault'a Ylddtab Opera, Co.
mclusively In til Yiddish tongue.) irlc. 85c, fiOo nd 75.
THEATER
PRICES: 15c25e50t"75c
TWO DAYS Starting MATINEE TODAY
OIO. M. COHAN'S P nomiml Musiaal Hit
LITTLE
20.Bi.Son.HiU.20 O IHI II IJ Y
THE r AHOtS AHtKllAM GIRLS jaJT(fT)FI IH ?5
MUSIC-LAUOHrEW-GIKLS
3 DAVSITrToA? NOV. IO-weo.TV
"PERCY a HAROLD" REUNITED
1 P AMD 4
DSWHES
AND THEIR BIO COMPANY OP SIXTY PEOPLE IN
TM PROMOTERS
A MUSICAL. L.AUQH TEST.
till)
"U I
orus I
LUCV
DALY
il IETSY KOLIVAI
Sain
Ctto
SUNDAY BKUL AM POYNTEft In LENA
Marlowe's present Impersonation, and the
loss in effect Is patent."
Responsibility for this defect" must of
course be shared by Mr. Sothern. His
choice ts Miss Marlowe's colleague for thin
unusual occasion wan fully Justified, for Ire
stands In the front rank of his profession.
His record of achievement In fine, btrt he
makes no Inspiring Antony. Physically he
is not thoroughly well endowed for the
part, which demands for best results an
actor made orr more heroic linen. The part
is romantic an well an tragic, and. clad In
the Ronran costurrre Bird wearing the bfard
which tradition demands or this character,
Mr. Sothern Is not a romantic figure. His
reading of the lines ts of course generally
Intelligent, btrt It is distinctly uninspired,
and the love-making of this eminent pair
in not in this performance of the kind for
which wars have been waged and empires
lost. Whether or not It was so. we like to
believe that Antony wn a very volcano
of a Roman, a Titan of a man and as
handsome as a god. Tradition is a trouble
some thing, nowhere more troublesome
than In the matter of whiskers.
Touching the subsidiary character, the
New theater Justified Its existence at a
bound. No Shakenperan play seen here in
years has been so well cast. Authority,
dignity and poise were noted especially In
the performance of A. E. Anson, who was
the Octavitis Caesar, nor was Ben Johnson
as Sextus Pompelun in any way his In
ferior, thottgh hi Scenes vanished from
the play after the dress rehearsal. One
would, moreover, go a long way outside
the New theater before finding "hit" parts
like Thyreus and the Clown, played by
such excellent and experienced actors a
Henry Stanford, formerly with Henry Irv
ing, and Ferdinand Gottschalk. long Iden
' tifled on our stage with eccentric lmper-
sonatlons.
The Kind of Critter He Was.
It was the Cliff Dwellers. Chicago's lit
erary club, and one of the members had
Just made a terrible, irremediable break
abottt another made It In his presence
and that of several other memberp.
"What ought I do now?" asked the
breakmaker, much embarrasseel.
"If I were you." suggested Fred Rich
ardson, the artist, who had heard the
whole proceeding. "I should go out and
wiggle rnv ears and eat another thistle."
Success Magazine.
AMI SEMK.VTS.
:W(o)Cq)RI
AUiiTODAY
Vlay
zak.
MISS EMILIE LESSiNG,';:r;
lacmari iiiiwu t.iiiikih i.iuuiiiUf
Woman of tha Burwood Stook Company.
A Strong Heart
Story ttilh Plenty
lomedy.l caches
Moral Lesson.
ENTIRE QALC., 25c
TUES., WED.
W E D. MAT.
THUnS., IIOV. 18-.1
THE I
The Pewerlal Prima at
Will Street Inlrloue
(rerformano.
MATINEES
Wednesday ani
Saturday
i no-.
3
SOPLE-BO
I
Kir k Uktf
Ladles'
Hand
Frolor
none
RIVERK
AHI'SEMENTI,
13 OVID'S THEATER
TOIVJIGHT and IVIOIMDAY
WAG EN HALS and KEMPER Present
TU.W OBKATEBT DRAMA OI
PAID I
nm omxATEBT drama
NIGHTS Beginning TUESDAY, NOV.
WITH SFSCXAX. PARISIAN MATIHCB WKDXTESDAT, WOT. 17.
JOHN CORT Present
THE COLLEGE PLAY WITH MUSIC
THE
BIG
SUCCESS
of the
Season
a-", 7 7
A COMSDY Or OOttlOB
r TIROIMIA TRIMS
FREDERICK
Price Evening, BSo to
THURSDAY, FRIDAY,
Oeo. M. Cohan' Most Recent
COHAN AND HARRIS
IDEALIZED
nrr
isO
IIS
WITH
GEO. EVANS
ASTD Til WORI.D FAMOUS HO VET BOTS
Presenting the biggest, most Important Hnd highest cIhsh minstrel r nler
talnment the world has ever witnessed, embracing all that extravagance can
possibly conceive, suggest or Imagine.
Netwl Sunday, Monday-"VIA
LIBERAT
...AND...
Grand Opera Company
At HORTICULTURAL EXPOSITION
Council Bluffs, Iowa, November 15-20
Performances every afterrcon and evening. General admission 23 cent
less than half the usual charge for this attraction. Season tickets l'J.00.
Reserved seats for the concert and opera 25 cents. ReaiTvatlons for the
Liberal I performance may he made now for any day or evening. Apply to
E. H. Doolittle, Council Bluffs, Iowa.
SOUSA AND
Saturday, Nov. 20, 1909
TWO GRAN ) CONCERTS
MATINEE AND EVENING
Seat sale opens Thursday,
Nov. 18th, at Auditorium.
Matinee prices 25c, 50c, 75c.
Evening prices 25c, 50c, 75c ,
and $1.00.
PHONBA
ytOUS4
INoAMM
ADVANCED VAUDEVILLE
Week Starting Matinee Today.
XXTUTTB ZYZKT DAY 8rl8,
1TEBT WiaXT 1:16
OsBAT
WILLY PANTZER COMPANY
Aeropantomlmlc Artists
Ftrat Amarlcan Tonr of
BERTS SIX MERRY GIRLS
Berg Sir IiUtlge Wleber
In a Kuropean Keoure Three Seen
Tnoo Olnger Olrla,
THE DOHERTY SISTERS
Singing and Dancing Comedlana
American rebut of,
THALIA QUARTETTE
Favorite English Music Hall Vocalist
PATOY DOYLE
The Droll Monologlst
o Cnca-- Wo Wah-e
COOK and STEVENS
KINODROME
Alway tire newent in motion pictures
New Musical Feature Extraordinary
ORPHEUM C0NCERT0RCKESTRA
15 TALIVTZD AST! STB It
(ipeclal
Engagement Extended for
(second Week,
Wilir.l.Crossy
and
Blanch Dayno
Presenting riisne or r-rogram
Bill BlMln'a Sabf"
rrloa 10c, 860, too, T6c
JEAII P. DUFFIELD
Teacher of Piano
Suite 404-05 i-t Bejd't Theater
IC33
or the generation
I if
16
GIRL LIFE IH THHEB ACTS
and MARGARET MAYO, with
V. BOWERS
$1.60; Matinee, SSe to tl.OO.
S ATURDAY JJ.V;!..
and Talked Abont Saocei
TnvjT
ifflT DAYS
TOFT
WIRELESS."
HIS BAND
ntKA STEAMSHIPS.
ClAM'l 1STK AVnOAX. CfcUlBB
msm rb. s to April it am
TO THE ORIEIlT
Bj S. A. Orosr Barf a erst
THE ONLY ORIENT CRU1.SE THIS WINTER
Under the Able Management of
rBABK O. cuts,
.nnir-thr.. d.yi. Including rwnt-four ttjt in
tirvl '.nil th. Holr Land (wuu ild irlp t.
Khartoum) coning only UU.U .nd up, Includla
.her. .xsumoua. p.ual fatal urn; Had.tr. Cadla,
Till., Alflars. Ualla. Ooaauntlnopl., Atbana.
tioana, th. Klvr.r.. .tn. Tick. is ood t. stos otr
In Hurop., t. Ineluda paaalun alar, ".
CRUISE AROUND THE WORLD
Tb. 6 A few vacanrius yet. H'mtler
Cruls Oct. 16. 'lu, and Feb. 4 '11. 660 aa.
Fin series Burop-Obraitunrgaii l our.,
(370 up. Hand tor prugrarns I please specify).
FRANK C. CLARK, TIim Bid , Naw Vara.
W. g. BOCK. UM rvus SL. OaU. N.k.
HOTELS.
SNAPP'S HOTEL
Excelsior Springs, Mo.
Strictly Modern. Cuisine I'nexcelled. 8er
vlc Ideal. L'p-to-dat In all Appointment.
Hut and cold water in every room.
All Room Equipped with Ixcal and
IvOiig Lilsrarrce Telephone. 100 Rooms
Mostly with Hatlr. Eery Hoonr an Out-
rde Hoom All of Generous size.
Zn Th Xeart of The City.
Broad and Bpaoloaa Trandaa.
&. E. and J. W. GNAPP,
Proprietors.
Call
by 'Phone
Whenever you waut yint
UrlDg. call 'Food Lwugiaj
ta and tnaka It kocwi '
through a Be Want AA
rs
BAND
V.
I)