Omaha daily bee. (Omaha [Neb.]) 187?-1922, November 05, 1909, Image 1

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    Omaha Daily
Bee
WEATHF.R FORECAST.
For Nebraska Fair.
For low a Fnlr.
For wenther report pee pauo 3.
'Oh ali rm tw- t Hr
OMAHA BEE
A r.-Sl if THE WL3
VOL. XXXLX-NO. 122.
.OMAHA, Hill) AY MOUSING, NOVUM BKK
5,
1PM-TVKLVK 1(1KS.
SIXOLK COPY TWO CENTS.
THE
House of Commons
Takes Final Vote
on the Budget
Government Has Majority of 230,
Which is Larger Than Min
istry Expected.
DEPARTMENT OF
STATE KEEPS OUT
Assistant Secretary Wilson Refuses
to Allow it to Be Drawn Into
North Pole Controversy.
GEOGRAPHERS MAKE REQUEST
The President is for Deep Waterways
IG0OI) CHANCE
FOR THE TICKET
Western Counties Come to Aid and
Republican Ticket May Yet
Maks Good.
NORTH DAKOTA
IS PAST CRAFT
New Battleship ii Speediest Fighting
Machine of Dreadnought Type
Afloat.
MAXIMUM BATE OF 22.25 OOTS
This Exceeds Record of Delaware and
the British Ship Bellerophon.
DEVELOPS 35,150 HORSE
v?
Kickel Composition Propellers Di.
280 Revolutions a Minute.
ITS BUILDERS ARE DELIGHTED
LONDON, Nov. 4.-The Home of Com
mons tor.lght passed the third rending of
the finance bill by a vote of 379 to H!.
The scene In the house wna a memorable
e. Seldom has there been a larger at
1ance of members and peers and the
rtatlc galleries wrer crowdede to ca
ll Chancellor Lloyd-George, Trcmlcr
and Mr. Balfour, the leader of the
. all spoke, and tense evcltement
ll present appearing to be lm-
he historic character of tho
v
Flrat Vessel of This Claaa to
Pitted with Turbine Engines
Farther Test to 1)0 Made
Today.
Be
ROCKLAND. Me.. Nov. 4. The North
Dakota la the fastest battleship of the
Dreadnought type afloat as well as one of
the two most powerful ships In the world.
Its screw standardisation tests over the
Rockland measured mile course today de
veloped a maximum speed of 22.25 knots,
an average of 21. S3. Both marks are In
excess of the best performances of either
Its sister ship, the Delaware, or the Bel
lerophon. the leading Dreadnought of the
British navy.
In attaining thla surprising speed the
turbine engines of the North Dakota were
forced to the davetopment of more horse-
' power than has been reached by any bat
tleship afloat. A maximum of 35,150
horae-power was recorded, while 33,875
horse-power waa the mean amount. The
maximum number of revolutions of Its
nickel composition propellors was 288 a
minute. It was found that 2B3 revolu
tions In this time were sufficient to
maintain the contract speod of twenty
one km Is.
The I rth Dakota, by Its performance
today, t u 1. e .1 precedence aa a general first
claaa battleship. Ita slater ship, the Del
aware, which waa given Its trials over
tha mile course On October 23, was In
uncertain possession of Mils honor by Its
trial performance, but the figures re
corded for the North Dakota today sur
pass those of any other Dreadnought.
There Is but one euch battleship afloat
ot the present time whose attainments
may exceed those of the North Dakota,
Thla la the Neptuna. Juat launched for the
British navy. Tha Neptune, however, will
have to attain to figures much In excess
of specifications to accomplish this. The
Bellerophon of the British navy has made
but 221 knots, as compared with the
North Dakota's norf nrmance today of
22.26.
Comparative Records.
Comparisons between the trial perform
ancee of the North Dakota and Delaware
Bister ships, are as follows:
North Dakota. Delaware.
Fastest speed; .v &.o 21
VI..K -need 2I.8".8 21.440
Kant Vininn newer 85.150 VO.OHO
Mian horse Dower 33.875 2S.578
Unofficial.
It waa on the first of Us runs over the
manured mile course, -following severa
ptellmlnnry rounds, that the North Dakota
made Its record. The tide was In Its favoi
nnd this Is not subtracted from the best
figures. In the recorded mean, or average
however, tidal corrections are made. The
five trials over the mile course were re
corded aa follows: 22.25. 21.41. 22.13, "1.505
and 23.1a.
The Influence of the tide on the vessl
speed Is shown In a comparison of the time
In BUCCitdlns miles. While the flvi speed
runs were being reccrded the North Dakot
was also undergoing a two hours' frBt fo
consumption of oil and coal. The Delaware
and the North Dakota are the first Rattle
ahips built for the United states nnvy t
use the oil spraying method. The showln
Is understood to have, been satisfactory.
H. S3. Smith, representing the. Forerlv.
Knlp Uiilldlr.f company, builders of th
North Dakota, was pleased at the ease.
1 with which the turbines "-orked and the
horse power developed.
V" First Tarblne Battleship.
In this connection It Is Interesting
note that the Delaware la equipped with
reciprocating englnea. The North Dakot
is the first American battleship of th
first class to have turbine engines in
stalled.
Captain Edward O. Evans, who narrowl
escaped detlh hen the tug Nexlneott
was sunk o!T Cape Ann several month
ago, was In charye of the North Dakot
today. A working crew of 400 men pushed
the vessel to ita record performance,
Beginning at 7 o'clock tomorrow mornln
tha North Dakota Is to be put through th
second test, a four hour run ' at twenty
one knots. It Is expected that an average
of about 11.75 knots will be developed. Th
' run will end off Boston Light, where th
North Dakota Will anchor and prepare for
Ita twenty-four hour run at twelve knot
Following thla It will undergo another
twenty-four hour test at nineteen knots.
Within six months It Is expected the North
Dakota and the Delaware wll lake the
places In the van of the American navy
line of sea fighters and will then rank aa
tha greatest battleships In commission
throughout the world.
it, In a brief speech, closing
hm said that It Is Incumbent upon
those who objected to the government's
taxes to provide some alternative! scheme
meet the nation's necessities. Where
was this scheme, he asked. Sooner or
ater Mr. Balfour must show his hand and
It would have to be a hand that would suit
the game of the tariff reformers.
The government, continued the premier.
mlsht be well content to rest Itself In
patience. There were only two Issues be
fore the houses the taxes proposed by the
budget or tariff reform.
Division was then taken and the an
nouncement of the vote showing the gov-
rnment's majority to be larger than had
been expected, was greeted With prolonged
ministerial cheers. The coiiervatlves had
counted upo na score of liberal absten-
lons, but apparently only two liberals
oined the nationalists In abstaining from
voting.
The bill will be formally passed on Its
first reading In the House of Lords tomor
row, the debate on the second reading,
which will determine its fate, beginning
November 22
Corn "Licker"
Cause of Pellagra
All
Products of Cereal Declared
Likely to Produce New
Disease.
Society Asks Office to Cable Minister
Egan for Aid.
WANT TO SEE DR. COOK'S DATA
Would Bring Pressure to Bear on
University of Copenhagen.
COMMITTEE GOES TO DENMARK
COLUMBIA. S. C. Nov. 4. Not alone
corn and ordinary products of food made
of that cereal, but the distilled spirits of
that grain, corn "llcker, ' plays an Im
portant part In the cause of the dread
disease pellagra.
This was declared today at the second
day's session of the national convention
on pellagra by distinguished physicians
In attendance.
There Is also a growing conviction, ac
cording to several of the speakers, that
pellagra already Is attacking horses,
cows, hogs, etc., as well aa human beings.
Tonight a permanent organization to be
entitled the National Association for the
Htudy and Prevention Of Pellagra was
perfected.
Farmers' Congress
Opens at Raleigh
James Bryce, British Ambassador,
Hillay A. Herbert Are Princi
pal Speakers.
RALEIGH, N. C, Nov. 4.-The Farmer's
National congress convened here today.
The principal address of the day will be by
the liiitish ambassador, James Bryco.
There al.o will bo an address by Former
Secretary of the Navy Hillary A. Herbert.
Secretary of Agriculture James Wilson la
expected to attend the congress.
Hundreds of delegates from the west are
here. The first session was delayed a day
so the western delegates might have time
to arrive.
State Department Will Take No
Action, Urcanse It Might lie Con
strued Official Endorsement
of Peary'e Claims.
WASHINGTON, Nov. 4. Refusing to be
drawn Into the Cook-Peary North pole
controversy, the State department today
declined a request that it cable American
Minister Egan to Copenhagen, to request
of the University of Copenhagen permls
slon to examine the records of Dr. Fred
erick A. Cook when they are submitted
to that Institution.
The request was made by a delegation
from the National Geographic society,
which will appoint a committee to visit
the foremont . Danish scientific Institution
to which Dr. Cook Is to submit his rec
ords. The desire to have the request for
permission to Inspect . the records go
through the official channels was made
at a conference between Assistant Secre
tary of State Huntington Wilson and
Messrs. Gannett, the government's chief
geographer; Edson, former president of
the' Board of Trade of Washington; Gros
venor, editor of the official organ of the
society; Gore and Colvllle, all prominent
members of the National Geographic so
ciety. Wkr Request Was Made.
The request waa made on the ground
that the examination would be by scien
tists of attainments particularly valuable
to the adjustment of the polar problem.
Every effort was made to surround the
delegation's visit with a veil of mystery,
one of the members even denying his
Identity when approached by a newspaper
reporter.
The department took the request under
advisement and later decided It could not
accede to It. It was felt that such action
would constitute official recognition of
Commander Peary as against Dr. Cook;
that any unusual action on Its part might
be Interpreted as an Indorsement of the
claim of one or the other of the two ex
plorers as to priority of discovery of the
pole. The department has ntlfled Secretary
Grosvenor of the society of Its attitude.
The - members of the committee which
will go to Copenhagen for the Geographic
society will be provided with the usual
letters of Introduction from the Blate de
partment to American diplomatic officers
abroad, asking that the committee be given
all courtesies or assistance possible con
sistent with the official duties of the dip
lomatic representatives. Letters of this
character are frequently Issued to citizens
of the United States traveling abroad.
Will Ask Cook for Data.
Determined effort will be made by the
committee to secure the Cook data. Dr.
Cook will be afforded every opportunity to
place his records or any Information bear
ing upon the trip before the committee,
which son after Its appointment will com
municate with him directly. This com
mittee will advise Dr. Cook of the recent
action of the society's board of managers
in awarding a gold medal to Peary and a
medal to Captain Bartlett, who navigated
Peary's ship to the far north and back,
and of Its virtually "marking time" aa to
other polar claims pending Investigation
and research. It will advise him of the
committee's desire to have ny data he
may be willing to present.
to
FAST RUN BY SILK TRAIN
Shipment by Milwaukee Itoad Will
Cross Continent In Less Than
Six Dnys.
CHICAGO, Nov. 4. B rilng acc den; whs
is exptcted to prove the fastest transconti
nental freight shipment ever made, reached
Chicago today, and with little delay was
sent on to complete the Journey from
Tacoma to New York.
Last Sunday four carloads of silk were
received from Japan at Tacoma, and at
6:45 p. m. this load, together with four
cars of salmon consigned to Minneapolis,
started over the Chicago, Milwaukee &
Puget Sound railway. The fish were left
at Minneapolis and the silk arrived here
today at 2:19 p. m. Within eleven minutes
these cars were transferred to the Penn
sylvania railroad and tomorrow the ship
ment will be In New York, thus muking
the entire run in lesa than six days.
Commission Plan
for Buffalo
Des Moines System is Adopted at
Recent Election by Decisive
' Majority.
BUFFALO. Nov. 1 Late election re
turns iln w that the Dea Moines charter
plan of city government by commission
waa adapted In this city. The total vote
In elghty-eeven of the 116 election districts
In the city on the plan was $,437. Of this
number T.217 voted "yes" and '1.230 voted
"r.o." The proposition having received a
majority In Its favor It Is now up to the
common council and the mayor of the city
to take action.
The total vote cast In the city for mayor
was eMU
Mr. and Mrt. t'lessa separate.
BALTIMORE. Nov. S-That Mr. and
Mrs. Henry Clews, Jr., of New Yoik. have
separated and that a divorce probably villi
follow, waa admitted tonight by Mrs
Clews sister, Mis. John ('. B. Pendleton.
Mrs. Clews first husband was Frederick
Gvbhardt of New York. In her maiden
hood she waa known aa the beautiful
L4.M hlorrir
SUFFRAGETTES 10 BE TRIED
FOR ATTEMPT ON BALLOTS
Mrs. Chapln nnd Mies Nrllana Are
Held for Attacking rolling;
Places.
SULLIVAN CROWDING FAWCETT
Full Returns Necessary Before Exact
Outcome Mav Be Given.
COUNT SLOW IN SOME SECTIONS
Two Big Counties Are Yet to Be
Heard From.
RESULT CLOSEST IN YEARS
Final Kesnlt Will Depend on Repub
lican Success In Twenty-Four
of the In reported
Counties.
Complete returns from sixty-seven coun
tirs of Nebraska. Including a number of
western sections which were expected to
nld the republican ticket, and Incomplete
returns from a few other counties, show
Judge F:wcrtt still nhead of Judge Sul
livan, though the margin Is not large.
The figures for these counties are; Dean,
Tfi.tX); Good. "ii.i".;i; Sullivan, 78.959; Barnes,
R0.573; Fawcett, 79.640; Sedgwick, SO.OnS.
Two years n-to these same counties gave:
Reese, 89.C91; Loomls. GS.301, a plurality of
21,?30, while Fawoetl's lead over Sullivan
In the same territory Is 2.SS1.
Complete Comities.
r a
COUNTY.
w W -
! : n r. m
Eft L w
J "
3
i
Of course, he
From the Minneapolis Journal.
is; and be is likely to need them right nway.
Antelope 1019
Banner tvo
limine 171
Hoone lo
Hurl (n:t
Builer KtM
Buffalo 17 i
Cedar lmi-i
Cheyenne 2-ii
Clay l.,i;;
Colfax V(if
Cuming Il.i2
Custer
Dakota
I Hwes
640
LIQUOR AND FEDERAL LAW
Court in Oklahoma Holds Interstate
Shipments Cannot Be Seized.
MUST BE DELIVERED FIRST
After They Are In. Hands of' Consiaraea
They Became 8ubet to State '
Un Tne-Ctat "aw
Case.
4. Mrs. Chapln, the mill- j
who made an attack on
during the Bermondsey I
LONDON, Nov.
tant suffragette,
a polling place
by-electlon last Thursday, was committed
for trial by the magistrate at the Old
Bailey today, on the double charge of
having unlawfully meddled with the ballot
box and caused grievous harm to the
presiding officer.
Mrs. Chapln broke a bottle containing
corrosive acid on a ballot box with the
apparent Intention of destroying the bal
lots which the box contained. The acid,
little of which found Its way into the box,
spattered upon election officials, one of
whom was severely burned.
MUs Alison Neilans also waa committed
for trial, charged with a similar attempt
to destroy ballots In another booth at the
same election.
Water Company Officials
Lock Horns Over Sidewalk
GUTHRIE, Okl., Nov. 4. Judge Cotter
11 In the United States district court here
today reaffirmed his decision that state
officials cannot Interfere wth interstate
commerce shipments of liquor before they
have been delivered to the consignees.
A determined fight between the state
corporation commission and a number of
tha larger railroad companies In Oklahoma
to test the constitutionality of the 2-cent
fare law and certain freight rates fixed by
the state, began in the United States dis
trict court here today before Judge W. C.
Hook.
The railroads are asking for a temporary
Injunction forbidding the enforcement of
these rates and today Judge Hook heard
arguments on the plea of abatement filed
by state officers, who contended that the
railroads had not exhausted their relief In
the Etate courts knd that the federal court
had no lurlsdictlon In the matter. On con-
cluslon'of the arguments Judge Hook an
ruunced that he would return an opinion
next Monday or Tuesday.
In making the announcement Judge Hook
asked:
"Assuming that the decision of the court
Is adverse to the defendants, how long will
It take the state tj prepare to conies.
tiieaction for an injunction?"
Replying, Attorney General West re
quested that the time be made indefinite,
as he did not anow how long It would
take to secure data to prove his conten
tion. Judge Hook finally, through the agree
ment of Attorney General West and rep
resentatives of the railroad companies
etated that if the decision on today's plea
of abatement was against the state, he
would hear arjuments on 'the application
for an Injunction In St. Loula Tuesday,
December 7.
The plaintiffs in the suit are the Atchi
son, Topeka & Santa Fe, the Oulf, Colo
rado & Santa Fe, the Missouri, Kansas At
Texas and the Midland Valley railroads.
All the plaintiffs are subject to the 2-cem
passenger rate excepting the Midland Val
ley railroad, which upon showing it a
not making a fair profit under the 2-cen.
rate, was exempted In accordance with t:..
stale law and permitted to charge 3 cents.
'Possums Are
Used in Taft
Day Decorations
There Is a possibility of the Florence
pumping station being shut off from the
public.
For years this beautiful building with Its
marvelous machinery has. been the mecca
of thousands of visitors, some of whom
have come long distances to view it.
A fight, a bitter fight, Is on between two
factions In Florence over the laying of a
sldewalV, and It Is this which may result
In the denial of tha pumping house to
public view.
A. U. Hunt, superintendent of the Omaha
Water company, and Harold Reynolds,
chief engineer of the Omaha Water com
pany, are leaders of the contending fac
tions, and Mr. Hunt Is the man who threat
ens to deny the water plant to the public.
Reynolds is also city engineer of Flor
ence, and It happens that the city council
of Florence Is with him.
A few days ago the council started to
lay a little walk from Reynolds' residence
to Minna-Lusa, the home of Mr. Hunt,
next to the pumping station, but thla
walk would have been Inconvenient to
thousands of people who visit the station.
Hunt maintained and he opposed It. He
wanted the walk laid diagonally from the
public street to the pumping station. One
day when Hunt waa In Omaha the city
workmen started to lay the walk aa Rey
nolda wanted It. This provoked a war and
everything but the militia waa called out.
Mrs. Hunt, perceiving what was about to
be done, hove to the scene of operations,
members of the city council appeared and
Mayor Tucker was routed from tha soli
tude of his languid rest and forthwith Mrs.
Hunt said things calculated to stop the
progress of any sidewalk. This particular
sidewalk work stopped. All she sought to
accomplish was a cessation of work until
her husband could be reached.
And there the thing hangs. . Hunt de
clarea that If Reynolds persists In his
plans he will shut off the pumping station
from the publlo and Reynolds says he will
persist.
Mr. Reynolds things his contention U
proper and just, as walks are usually laid
on corners instead of the bias, and fur
thermore, because cutting acrosa would cut
him out entirely. He says he did not start
the move for the walk, anyway, but wat
aimply following out the council's Instruction
TAXATION BOARD IN FIGHT
WITH PACKING CONCERNS
Wyandotte County Commissioner
Issues Compulsory Order for
I'lunta to Show I p Records.
KANSAS CITY, Nov. 4. The contest be
tween the packers and the commissioners
of Wyandotte county over the question of
taxes has reached an acute status. The
board Issued a compulsory order today di
recting Sheriff Becker to feisa the books
of Swift and company. Another summons
was Issued for I. H. Rich, manager of
Swifts, who waa arrested yesterday for
falling to obey a former summons.
"If the sheriff fails to obtain the books
of Swift and company for us, we will ob
tain a writ of mandamus from the Kansas
supreme court compelling him to act," C.
W. Trlckett. attorney for the commission
ers, said this morning. "The board expects
to use every bit of authority that It haa
under the law to compel the packers to
produce their records. There may be some
fines and sentences to Jail for contempt
before we get through."
President Greeted by Thousands of
Citizens of Macon at the .
' .. State Fair.
MACON, Ga., Nov. 4. It was nearly S
o'clock this morning when President Taft
awoke in his private car. He was wel
comed by the varioua committees of Macon
citizens, who had gathered at the union
station, where the train had been parked
over night, and was then escorted to the
residence of Congressman Charles L.
Bartlett for breakfast. The breakfast party
waa small.
From the Bartlett home the president
was escorted to the state fair grounds.
The welcome accorded the natlon'a head
was one of the most enthusiastic received
anywhere on the tour. The streets were
lined with thousands of citizens and school
children, the schools having closed for a
half holiday.
The decorations also were Buggestlve of
"Taft" day, live 'possums and persimmons
forming part ot the elaborate scheme
Stores, offlcea and homes were gay with
the national colors, mixed with a liberal
display of the confederate emblems.
The president made a short speech.
From the fair grounds the presidential
arty went directly to the train and de
parted for Savannah, where they will ar
rive about 6:30 this evening.
Governor Brown of Georgia and other
stats officials accompanied the party.
GOVERNOR ADMITS HIS TALK1
Nebraska Executive Says He Boosted
Ex-Governor Francis. ,
OTHER DEMOCRATS FALL IN LINE
the
Banks in New York
to Be Merged
Gotham is to Have Another Hundred
Million Dollar Institution.
NEW YORK, Nov. 4. New York is to
have another "hundred million dollar
bank," to be known as the "Mechanics and
Metals National." The new banking insti
tution is a consolidation of the Mechanics
National bank and the National Copper
bank. The meiger, already approved by
the two directorates, will represent com
bined assets of $100,000,000.
The Mechanics National bank, founded
M years ago, has a capital of 13,000.000, a
.uiplus of $3,000,000 and deposits of nearly
40,000.000. The National Copper bank, or
ganized less than three yeara ago, has a
capital of $:'.OU0O0, a surplus of nearly $3,
000.000 and deposits of $33,000,000.
Gates W. McGarrah, president of the
Mechanics National bank, will be president
of the new Institution.
Trip Down Mississippi One ot
Fleaaant . Incidents of Tern
W. K. Andrews 8toj 1
Lincoln,
(From a Staff Correspondent.)
LINCOLN, Nov. 4. (Special.) Even
though he Is on Bryan ground. Governor
Shallenberger does not repudiate his In
terview nominating former Governor Fran
els of Missouri as the democratic candi
date for president. Instead Governor
Shallenberger said this morning that his
mention of the former governor's name
as a democratic candidate and probable
nominee was heartily received by the dem
ocrats on the presidential trip who heard
his address. The morning after hla state- 1
ment had been made public many of the
prominent democrats aboard came to the 1
Nebraska executive and Informed him that
his statement had not been taken as a
Joke, but that he had touched on a live
wire.
Former Mayor Frank Brown of Lincoln
was one of the first callers tne governor
had upon his return to Lincoln.
"I want to congratulate you on the nom
ination of Francis of Missouri for the dem
ocratic nomination for president," said the
cx-mayor, who is one of Mr Bryan's closest
friends. "He would make a strong candi
date." Then the mayor went on to explain
that, of court-e, he hoped that Mf. Bryan
would flnully be elected, president and that
if the Nebraskan would consent to make
the race a fourth lime he would be -for
him. In fact, he would be for him for any
office he wanted. But In case Mr. Bryan
did not care to make the fourth trial for
the goal he Would prefer Francis to any
other man in America,
The governor's statement was made at
the conclusion of a banquet on the gov
ernors' boat at which Governor Hadley of
Missouri had been somewhat of a Hon by
reason of the fact that he had been the
first republican elected governor of that
great etate for some thirty years. Gov
ernor Hadley had told hla hearera what
a great state Is Missouri and that the
president could find anything he deslrod
in Its borders, not excepting his voice,
which he lost In Texas.
Governor Shallenberger In his talk re
ferred to himself as having a career
somewhat similar to that of Hadley In
that he was the only living democratic
governor of Nebraska. Then he added
to the things Hadley suit of Missouri by
saying that three times Nebraska had
tried for the presidency and lost, and
the democrats of liH state nnd abiut
concluded that perhaps it would be a case
Dawson 1.U7
Deuel 27
Dixon I!
Dodge lMKi
1 I oiiliis 7221
Fillmore lt'.3
Fiankiln lo2J
Furnas Iln7
Gage 1H13
Garfield 2W
Grant 74
Greeley 711
Hsll Kil'.t
Hamilton IXC
liuiian 810
Hayes 22J
Hiiclieock 45
Hooker M
Howard llou
Jclferson 10(H
Johnson k0
Kearney .,
Kolih 2.14
Kimball 122
Lancaster 351S
LoKan 119
Madison 1201
Merrick S".j
Moi row 240
Nance 704
Nuckolls 112K
Otoe lo!"6
i'awnee 75
Bcrkins 215
Fierce sii7
1'helps 900
Folk 10.K1
I'latte 1V7S
Red Willow.... W1
Richardson .... lfilit
Sarpy 7H2
.Saunders 184
Scott's Bluff... 412
Sew ai d 16k
Sherman Wl
Stanton 712
Thayer 12itf
Thomas .")
Washington ... 2
Wayne fc-D
ensier 116a
York lti;U
VS9
IA
145
1124
MS
18i7
Ii22
i.3
2.11
li4
4ii
1178
2.00
,.fn
f,3l)
132.1
2,1
7N1
1810
727
U'8
1001
llol
lHi'3
2.(7
70
745
1121
14:2
Mi
221
480
08
107
1089
m;
287
117
3il2
114
12.10
873
210
tiiltt
U(i0
10.12
73
214
840
1124
11 33
1,!U
7H0
1522
TM
20b9
40D
lb20
Of.7
704
1249
87
962
r.97
1128
1S26
1009
1.2
161
ll.2
1.22
17i
I. 4
13.ri8
2.19
II, 15
827
nn
22 ,5
filifi
641
1X5
24
72
1S44
7tl6(l
lw.fi
1013
1147
l!7i
216
77
76.S
1650
lXa
8B4
222
4M
58
Uu7
ll'Ji
133
lit!
lw8
H6i
1014
1744
1118
3,9
1641
ill
!.I8
1700
625
0,9
141Hi
474
3o
It j
IKK3
li09
02
102 J
2TM)
273
lit!
337
1674
1310
M3
214
600
76
7!M
10W
135
li
lit
11 Ul
V76
1716
1103
3M)
1U36
4W
900
1213
631
tkH
1374
470
813
1777
D229
1. 01
HI
ltihi
2710
268
117
28
1038
1118
13
177
..1
.16
10.4
1740
nr.
340
1.")2
677
i.s
t.28
6lM
13,6
4liu
910
17)
9010
l.,l4
875
1007
Z7'fl
2u2
115
Ml
H2'
13.0 l.M
836 804
J07K JfrO
87 im
929
22
121
3' .04
113
12' Kl
948
232
725
ltl
1034
717
214
SCJ
932
1128
19(10
802
1523
743
1939
46S
1579
868
8
1252
92
1027
689
1129
1715
372
229
4W4
99
1411
940
339
897
1146
15D8
1146
226
W0
1125
9i9
7h0
9N8
1300
649
1749
(84
1310
583
621
1412
08
H6il
804
1133
1969
276
497
TS
768
14'.
10 '6
793
343
214
4647
99
1401
940
MS
878
1145
1043
11S.1
225
w
1092
924
73
9i0
1371
bii
im
801
1293
669
619
1378
04
1171
T94
1127
1978
Incomplete Coantlea.
Cass, 21 of 25...
Cherry, 14 of 29.
Frontier, 4 of 26
Lincoln, 24 of 41
iJeuianu, 3 of 19
Thurston, 2 of 9
622
2U1
79
4Mi
152
137
631
2bl
81
484
169
138
317
259
81
600
157
141
494
2tf
850
204
110
496
280
108
880
188
122
2.7
492
73
820
1524
lfc-2
793 .
3. si
219
4682
KM
1391
U.6
847
878
1140
15S0
1126
220
005
1077
064
792
982
1301
648
176ti
910
13,8
649
615
1377
05
1163
788
1167
2131
497
2J
106
841
201
114
Totals..
.7tn;s3 76550 789 80378 79640 80038
(Continued on Second I'age.)
Troops Are Called to
Ward Off Night Riders
Turfman Oat of llausrer.
NEW YORK. Nov. 4 H. Thomas, the
Kentucky tuifman, who waa stabbed by
Jockey Carroll Schilling at Kheepshead
Bay last Hunday. Is now out of danger.
LOUISVILLE, Ky., Nov. 4. -Jackson la
quiet for the present and Mason county
has again taken the center of the stage,
one of lis residents having called fui
troops as protection against night riders.
The supplicant Is Benjamin Longnecker.
whose young daughter some nights ago
held back attacking night riders at the
muzzle of a rifle.
Longnecker has made his call througil
the department of the adjutant general,
but the Information at Frankfort, the state
capital, la that when the sheriff of Mason
county offered Longnecker protection, th
farmer refused to tell who waa threatening
him. For this reason. It Is said. Governor
Wilson ia disinclined to send troops.
The Lexington company, under Captal.t
J. R. Sams, is today at Jackson to main
tain order until the present session of the
grand Jury adjourns on Saturday.
Last night'a freedom from shouting and
disorder at Jackson is attributed to Sheriff
Crawford, who was refused direction of
the troops on the ground that they mlgiil
as well be turned over to feudists. Jack
son citizens appealed to Crawford, af'.er
the wild election night, and he used ills
Influence to restrain the mountaineers last
night
LEXINGTON, Ky.. Nov. 4-The Lexing
ton company of soldiers on duty at Jack
son for the last trree days was withdrawn
today and returned here. Everything la re
ported quiet at Jackson,
CHALQIvEri ENFORCES NEW
IAW WITH REVOLVER
Former II units nd of Authoress Com
pels Chauffeur of Auto to Help
Manoae Fractions Horse.
COBIIAM, Va.. Nov. 8-John Armstrong
Chaloner, divorced husband of Amelia
Rives, the authoress, now Princess Trou
betskoy and brother of Lewis Rtuyvesant
Chanler, fornjer democratic candidate for
governor of New York, and who( a year
or more ago was exonerated by a Jury for
the death of John Glllet. who waa shot and
killed In a scuffle with Chaloner In tha
Merrle Mills, Chaloner'a home In Albert
county, today held up an automobile loaded
with passengers on a publlo road at the
point of a revolver.
He forced the chauffeur to descend and
lead his horse, which had become fright
ened, around the machine and out ot the
way of danger. Thia la the first time that
the Virginia law requiring a chauffeur to
render aid In such, contingencies has ever
been enforced In such a drastic measure
and by a private citizen.
Chaloner maintains that the revolver,
which he says he la in the habit ot carry
ing, was unloaded.
FUNERAL OF PRINCE IT0
Magnificent state Ceremony at Hloya
Park, ToUlo, Tester
day.
TOKIO, Nov. 4. The mneral of Prince
Ito, who was assassinated at Harbin, took
place today. It was a great state cere
mony, magnificent In point of display. The
popular demonstration of sympathy was
the most widespread ever seen In Japan.
The funeral ceremony at Hlbya 1'ark
ai ded at noon and the interment will take
place at a later late at Omorl.
DODGE AGAIN HEADS VETERANS
fteneral Is Analn Elected President
at MeetlnsT Held la
Columbus.
COLVMBL'S, O.. Nov. 4.-Before adjodrn
Ihk the convention t''ay, the Society of the
Army of the Tetinesseo elected officers for
the ensuing year.
General Grenvllle Dodge of Council Bluffs,
la., was re-elected president and Mrs. L. D.
Montgomery of Council Bluff waa batued
as vice president.