Omaha daily bee. (Omaha [Neb.]) 187?-1922, May 01, 1903, Page 6, Image 6

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    THE OMAHA DAILY - l!I?Et Fill DAY, MAY 1, 1003.
0
The Omailv Daily Bee.
B. ROdEWATER, EDITOR.
PUBLISHED EVERT MORNINO.
TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION.
Dally 1m (without Sunday), On Year..MO0
Inlly I.ea snd Sunday, One Year
Illustrated Use, One Year j-J
Sunday Bee, One Year f
Bturday Bee. One Tear J-jJ
Twentieth Century Farmer, One Year.. 1.00
DELIVERED BY CARRIED.
Dally Bee (without Sunday), per copy.... to
Illy Bee (without Sunday), per week...lio
Dally Bee (Including Sunday), per week..I7o
fcunday Bee, per copy JO
Evening Bee (without Sunday), per week So
livening- Bee (Including Sunday), Pr
week 100
Complaints of Irregularities In delivery
should be addressed to City Circulation De
partment. OFFICE9.
Omaha The Bee Building. .
South Omaha-oty Hall Building. Twenty-fifth
and M Street.
Council Bluffs iO pearl Street.
Chicago 1640 Unity Building.
New York 232S Park Row Building.
Washington 601 Fourteenth Street.
CORRESPONDENCE.
Communications relating to new and edi
torial matter should be addressed: Omaha
Bee. Editorial Department.
REMITTANCES. .
Remit by draft, express or postal order,
payable to The Bee Pub"lng Company.
Only t-cent stamps accepted In payment ot
mall accounts. Personal checks, except oil
Omaha, or eastern exchanges, not accepted.
THE BEE PUBLISHING COMPANY.
STATEMENT OF CIRCULATION,
fata nf K'.hr. . V TVinlaa County. SO.!
George B. Tssc.huck, secretary of The Be
Publishing Company, being duly, sworn,
Sava that the ai-tuaf number of full ana
eomnleta nna of The Dally. Morning.
Evening and Sunday Bee printed during the
month of March. l0t. was as follows
TUB MILKS BtrvRT.
Any effort to discredit the national
administration through the report of
General Miles regarding bis investiga
tions In the Philippines rlll have no
effect with fair-minded men. It must
of course be admitted that some of the
statements of the report are of a se
rious nature, showing that there hnve
been in the army in the Philippines
men who were unworthy to wenr the
American uniform, but It Is not shown
that there has been any laxity either at
Manila or In Washington In properly
dealing with those who have wantonly
violated the lawa of civilised warfare.
It Is a well-attested fact that officers who
have been charged with cruelty or other
wrongs have been subjected to court-
martial and punished if convicted. Pos
sibly some hnve escaped detection. Per
haps, also, there has In some Instances
been too great leniency on the part of
courts-martial. But we are not aware
of any case where' charges have been
1 29,3 IS
(SleBlO
tttesseeae(i31730
4 u.eio
I.... Bl1M
6e.aejftaeAla0OO( .
T 81,600
(.. TO
si.eoo
10 si, wo
U.,. w.. 61, 7SO
II 81,720
IS...' 81.TB0
It S1.70O
U .8S.530
U. 81.S40
Total
11 81.TOO
U Sl.TBO
II 81,680
JO. 81,40
XI 81.B60
X2 89,21V
2. 88JM
14 81,640
81,810
26 81.T40
17 81.TTO
31 S1.U70
tt .....2,0O0
8) 81,20
U .81,700
.070,008
unsold and returned copies... lo,481
Net total sales..... 09,814
Net average sales BO.WJO
GEORGE B. TZSCHUCK.
Subscribed In my presence and sworn to
before me mis mat day ot Marco, a. -
Uut. M. B. HUNGATB,
ISesX) Notary PubUo.
May Day has come and organised
labor and organized capital are again
face to face.
When the corporations have it In for
anybody the corporation lawyers and
the corporation strikers have It In for
him also.
By a legislative blunder the number
of Justice courts In Lincoln will In
crease from two to three, which la Just
three too many. .
The democratic barn stormers point
with pride to their platform, but they
hare notbeen able to point with pride
to their candidate for mayor.
Republicans afflicted with conscien
tious compunctions about voting for
Mayor Moores should remember that a
vote for Benson la half a vote for
IIowelL
K Unless the building contractors and the
worfclngmen engaged in-' the building
trades arbitrate their differences pretty
soon Omaha will experience a killing
frost In mld-aummer.
The boodle Investigation at Spring-
field partakes very much of the char
acteristics of the Bartley investigation
at Lincoln. The investigators appear to
be trying hard to find nothing.
of inferences. This Is a disposition
which should be earnestly encouraged.
As was said by Senator Hanna there
is always a neutral ground, a neutral
league committee whose assessments
bad been raised and endorsed bis com
petitor, C. O. Lobeck. For this measly
course no explanation has yet been
position where the great forces of labor offered and can not be given unless we
and capital can meet and at least con
sider the situation. The tendency to
find this ground which Is being mani
fested Is a fact In the present situation
which Is highly reassuring.
assume that In their seal for Benson
the tax reform members of the exchange
have sacrificed and traded away Hunter
to appease the wrath of the corporations
and mercantile tax beaters.
WRY DO TIF orrOSK MUOBtSt
All the corporations opposed Frank B.
Moores In the republican primaries and
all the corporations have Joined hands
to defeat him at the election next
Tuesday. It goes without saying that
the - corporations never- oppose a man
who is willing to do their bidding. They
are arrayed against Moores because he
has resisted co.porate pressure and will
not take bis orders from the corporation
managers. The Burlington raiiroaa, ror
example, has opposed Moores because
he signed the ordinance granting the
made that the military authorities have right to the Northwestern Railroad com-
declined or failed to make an Investlga- pany to extend Its tracks Into the Job
bing district, thus destroying the
monopoly of railroad trackage which the
Burlington had for many years enjoyed.
This action on the part of Moores was
clearly In the Interest of Omaha, and
especially of Omaha manufacturers and
Omaha wholesale dealers. But while
Moores has Incurred the everlasting
enmity of the Burlington he has failed
to Inspire gratitude or local patriotism
among the Jobbers who have Joined
handa with the Burlington In Its des
perate effort to down Moores and elect
Howell by projecting Stalking Horse
Benson Into the campaign.
Whether the Missouri Pacific has any
thing In cohimon with the Burlington on
switching grievances Is not discernible,
but Its general manager la openly shout
ing for Boomer Benson when he must
know that Benson has no more chance
of being elected mayor than he has of
being struck by lightning In mid-winter.
While there is no community - of
Interest In terminal privileges between
the Union Pacific and the Burlington,
tlon.
As to the statements of General Miles
they are made, as he himself confesses,
on hearsay and without any proof to
substantiate them. lie obtained them
mainly from Filipinos, who In most
Instances failed to put their charges
In writing. This Is not the sort of testi
mony which the American people will
be disposed to accept as justifying a
sweeping condemnation of the army In
the Philippines. The, reply to the re
port made by Judge Advocate General
Davis must convince anybody open to
conviction that no effort has been spared
In the matter of Investigating charges
against military (Officers. Even now in
vestigations are In" progress as to
charges made long ago and If they are
found to have a substantial basts -it Is
not to be donbted that the officers
against whom they are made Will be
tried and If convicted Will be punished.
It would seem that no rational person
could believe that President Roosevelt
or Secretary Root would shield any
In his latest lecture at Hampton, Vs.,
at the Industrial institute, Booker
Washington hits the nail on the head
when be declares: "The negro Is
seeking no social equality. The
negro Is as proud of his own race
as the white man is of his race.
I believe it Is the duty of the white
people to try to get Insight Into the
domestic, buHlness, moral and religious
life of the negro and this they can do
without Introducing the bugbear of
social equality. I believe the white
people of this country have about begun
to realize that they can't get rid of the
negro. The necro Is not going to
colonize; he is not going to die out and tnln Broadway is the longest street
ROt'ND ABOtT SEW YORK.
Ripples en the Cnrrent f Mfe I"
Metropolis.
The best dressed men In New York are
the Wall streeters. There Is one young
member of the stock exchange who Is fa
mous for bis clothes. He has a wardrobe
In his private office and changes his suit
three times day at 10, at noon and at
t o'clock. A busy session on the Boor will
wreck any suit. Most ot the brokers wear
an old office coat in the shuffle and tur
moil, and there Is scarcely an active mem
ber but has an extra pair ot trousers to
put on after the close ot business. Scores
of little tailors In the financial district
make a good living pressing trousers at
60 cents a pair.
City engineers in the various depart
ments, reports the Times, have become In
volved during the last two weeks In a dis
cussion as to whether New York city has
the longest continuously paved street of
any" city In the United Ststes. Some en
gineers said that Broad street, Philadel
phia, held the record, and others that Dela
ware avenue In Buffalo, leading out to Ton-
awanda, was the longest continuously
paved street In the country. "Some people
yon can't bury him. You've got him
here and the best thing you can do for
him Is to make him a decent, self-re
specting, honest American citizen."
Under the law. recently enacted
county funds may be loaned out at two
per cent per annum, but that permission
Is not by any means to be construed as
a prohibition of accenting as high a
rate of Interest as any responsible bank
Is willing to pay. Douglas county treas
ury dopoplts have been farmed out for
years without yielding any Income to
the county under pretense that the law
did not authorize the deposit of these
funds at a lower rate than three per
cent Now that the limit Is reduced to
the rate that is being paid by the banks
on city deposits taxpayers have a right
to Insist that the funds shall earn some
Interest for the county.
said Engineer N. P. Lewis of the Board of
Estimate. "From the standpoint of length
Broadway Is one of the longest streets
since the names of sections In the Bronx
have been changed. Broadway at the pres
ent time extends from the Battery to the
city line. There is a break in the pave
ment of about half a mile. In a few years
the breaks in the pavement will be filled In,
and then there can be no discussion as to
New York's right to claim the longest con
tinuously paved street In this country. New
York will then have a street fifteen miles
in length from the Battery through the
boroughs of Manhattan and the Bronx up
to the city line. Broadway became the
longest street In the country by the change
In the name of the Boulevard to Broadway,
and also the change In the name ot King's
Bridge road to Broadway."
At a meeting ot the creditors ot the Led
ger Monthly, held last Monday, at which
nearly all those Interested were repre
sented, the concern was sold to J. H. Ble-
bert, who publishes a periodical known as
ine campaign of deception and im- f the Leda-er oomoany. said that the trans- should do something
BETTER GET TOtiKTIIEH,
President Roosevelt Shoal Re Heeded
In Omaha.
Chicago Tribune.
The sentiments regarding the proper
relations of capital aud labor uttered by
President Roosevelt at Omaha wero ap
plauded by a large audience. He pleaded
with capitalists and worklngmen to deal
with matters which Interest thern both
free from arrogance on tho one side and
devoid ot envy on the other. He scored
the demagogue who endeavors to excite
class hatred as the wo rot enemy of the clans
whose champion he pretends to be. He
said and no one will dispute It that "In
the long run and as a whole we are going
to go up together, or go down together,"
and hence the necessity for honesty and
common sense In dealings between capital
and labor, whose interests are so Inex
tricably Interwoven.
It Is said that the president's theme was
suggested to him by cltliens ot Omaha,
who hope words coming from his Hps In
behalf of industrial peace will serve to
avert the Industrial strife which it Is feared
will begin In that city May 1. There are
apprehensions of a number of strikes on
that day and of stormy times. It Is to be
hoped that the president's remarks will
have a good Influence. They were cheered
by those who heard them, and their wis
dom will not be questioned by those who
read them. It Is to be feared that not all
the men who should be Influenced by the
president's advice will pay attention to It.
There will probably be some employers
and also some . worklngmen who will re
fuse to listen to good advice, even when
It comes from a president of the United
States. Even if the Omaha papers act on
the suggestion of the president, and print
for the Instruction of their readers the
concluding portion of the report of the
anthracite strike commission which cer
tainly makes excellent reading labor men
who have formulated demands and em
ployers who have refused to accede to them
may fall to read the report, and If they do
read It may decline to admit that It lays
down a rule of action for them.
The president has done all he can do
in the premises. It devolves now on the
municipal authorities of Omaha, the busi
ness men, and all good citizens who are
Interested In the preservation of indus
trial peace to take the matter Into their
hands and make a united effort to pre
vent damaging strikes or to settle them
speedily. The whoje community will be
affected bv the threatened strikes. It
besides asking the
GOOD RinDAJCK.
th
A revr Pouted Remarks
IMttanara: Wddla. i
Minneapolis Journal. J
If there is anything that will tempt a
sober, soft spoken American cltlsen to wish
for temporary control ot a plethoric vocabu
lary of oplthets and expletives It Is such
an affair as that Yarmouth-Thaw wedding
In Pittsburg.
Here Is an Amerieaa girl at beauty,
wealth and good position who has madly
thrown herself away on a miserable scion .
of a woruout and leached aristocracy, a
wretched parasite, dependent, unprincipled. T
a low muslo hall singer, a greedy dowry J
hunter, who for all his pauperism declined
to marry the girl If she brought mm omy
$80,000 a year.
There are ugly but quite believable re
ports that this despicable matrimonial
fortune hunter who could not get his foot
Into thousands Of American homes actually
delayed the wedding for half an hour while
he haggled over a few more pieces of gold
as the price of bis consent to marry the
Thaw girl. The whole contemptible barter
and sale Is enough to make every American
blush.
The only bright side of this revolting
affair Is the reluctance of Miss Thaw a
mother to consent to the accursed alliance,
but that reluctance Is blemished by her
final consent to add $70,000 a year to satisfy
the greed ot this misnamed nobleman who
would not take the girl and $30,000.
There Is, however, this consolation: Miss
Thaw for all her millions must be an un
worthy daughter ot America, If she Is
willing to mate with such a noble remnant
as the earl of Yarmouth. With his $100,000
a year the earl will probably take her and
himself out of the United Ststes and stay
out, and by that double riddance the country
will bo bettered.
DOBture la to rnlmlnntu Rntnrrinv hv ih . v.. ha hean made, and nrealdent for a kindly word. It ehouid
- - mrj --- I l t-U U ll V,VI I j " ' , . g. . . - ,
general distribution of unsolicited
ha ierT Month owners were now In noe- make a concerted effort to reconcile local
- I O - wwb, av MWU va ' - DV I IV 1 1 v va uu- I " - - 1 , . .
officer of the army who was known to there Is a sympathetic feeling between jTlce and corporation sample ballots pre- e,0 of the Ledger. The price is said capital ana iqcbi ipor,
have committed cruelties and barbarl- that corporation and all the other rail- pared in the name of the alleged Mu- Uound' fibres "abHut SoM.'on.' the TOO MUCH P
ties such as General Miles speaks of. I roads against Moores because Moores
The president and secretary of war are Is held primarily responsible for the
unquestionably as solicitous as any one I raise in the assessment of the railroads
can be for the good name and honor 1 from $206,000 to more than $25,000,000,
of the army. Not even General Miles I The Intense hostility of the franchlsed
nlclpal League of Omaha, which has not
had a tangible existence for years and
Is made up of about a baker's dozen of
business men politicians. It Is a matter
of notoriety that the committee, which
himself Is more anxious to preserve the corporations to Mayor Moores is due to embodies about all there Is left of the
fame of the American soldiers. It may
be said, also, that Governor Taft and
bis associates In the civil government
of the Philippines are the last men who
should be suspected of blinking at out
rages of the nature stated In the Miles
report It Is simple Justice to those
men to believe that If they were aware
of such outrages they would not hesi
tate to denounce them and bring them
to the attention of the military authori
ties. The national administration has
done Its duty In the Philippines and
will not suffer In the resnect of falr-
the position Moores has taken In favor
of municipal ownership, cheaper light
and power and reduced telephone tolls.
The Thomson-Houston electric lighting
monopoly is opposing Moores and favor
ing Howell because Moores Insists that
the . city of Omaha shall own and
operate Its own electric lighting plant
and because he exerted his Influence in
favor of the submission of the ordinance
granting a franchise for. the proposed
electric power canal.
The telephone monopoly Is opposed to
Municipal league, agreed to disagree
and that the circulars to be sent out
were prepared by the rump of the com
mittee for the rump candidate of the
republican convention with a populist
label. ,,
round figures, about $30,
creditors who was present at the sale said
afterward that there had been only two
offers for the property, the -one from Mr.
Siebert and another ot $2,500. "It was that
or bankruptcy," added the disconsolate
creditor, "so we agreed on the sale, al
though It won't pay 10 cents on the dollar
of our claims. The payment waa to be
$1,000 In cash and $5,000 within three da,ys."
Mrs. Barbara Morgan, a colored woman,
who weighs several hundred pounds, when
Remember that citizens who failed
to register last November must present
themselves for registration at their re
spective yotlng districts next Satur
day. This also,, includes the citizens
who registered this spring for the prl-
Moores because he has shown a disDo-1 mnrles, but were not registered last fall,
minded people from what Is said In the Sitlon to respond to public sentiment that or were not entitled to vote at last fall's
. - . ... .1,- - .... I rru ' L :' , x . i . . . .
report or uenerai Miles. I aemanas competition ana a reduction of
telephone tolls. The street railway and
our DErBNSKLESS islands. gas company, which are practically
Attention Is called to the defenseless I under one management, have made corn-
condition of the Philippines in the re-1 mon canse with the, electric lighting
election. The registration of this class
of citizens at the primary election does
not count at the. general election this
spring.
monopoly and telephone' monopoly
against Moores because be has stood
up for Omaha rather than for the cor
porations and has committed himself to
a policy tbey regard as Inimical to their
Interests. If the water works company
It Is not true that Mr. Benson Is a
confirmed tax-shirker. He paid $7.05
Into the city treasury In personal taxes
last year and would be willing to guar
antee doubje that amount for a war
ranty deed to the office of mayor.
Good roads, the trolley and the rural
free delivery are all steps in the same
direction. Coupled with the farm tele
phone they will completely revolu
tionize farm life before the first quarter
of the twentieth century has expired. '
port of General Miles, who renews the
recommendation be made soon after
the naval victory at Manila that at
least one strategic position be fortified
beyond the possibility of capture by
any foreign fleet or fleets. 'There Is
no Immediate danger of the kind which
General
but his
and
will receive attention from the next forced the Issue between themselves and
congress. Military experts both here the people, so that It Is no longer a ques-
and abroad have pointed out that In the I tlon of parties or men, but a question of
event of war between the United States whether Omaha shall govern Itself or
and a European naval power the archl- whether Its people shall submit to cor
pelago would be a vulnerable point and I porate domination.
would doubtless receive the early at-
The democratic state press Is taking
a very active Interest In the Omaha
municipal campaign, not because Howell
stands for reform, home rule and cor
porate restriction, but because his elec
tion would give the democrats a power-
PROSPKRITY.
in. Brother wttfc tbe Palefaee
Poor Lo Can't Std It.
Chicago Record-Herald.
Sad news comes from Oklahoma, where
an Investigation of the condition of Lot the
poor Indian has recently been made by a
renreaentatlve of the government. It ap
pears that the Indians of Oklahoma are suf
fering from too much prosperity. Ten or
twelve years ago they were nusy and happy.
Thor owned land, each head or a lamny
she has had occasion to pass from her had a pony or two, a few dogs, pigs, cnica
room Into the public hall, on West ena and other necessities ot life. a"l the
Twenty-sixth street, she has always man- days came and went with a pleasing, It
aged It by going sideways. Her oil stove somewhat monotonous regularity,
was overturned last Monday morning, and Today the noble red men of Oklahoma ap-
to save her life, Mrs. Morgan broke for vtMT t0 be rapidly oing to tha bad. Their
the door. Ia her haste she forgot, and jana has turned out to be valuable and
approached the opening full fronted. The they are leasing It to whit men at high
result was that she was wedged in the prces. The result Is that the Indians are
casing, and could aot'move. , 1 n0 longer forced to work for a living and
The firemen pulled from in front; tne i the .r. ranidlv falling Into habits oi iaie-
furnlture was burning In the rear. "Dars .... and vloe. The report of the commis
sioner who has been lookipg Into the mat
ter says: ' '
"Prom habits of Industry and tnim jnese
Indians, or most of them, have become
Idlers and vagrants on the face ot the
earth. The heat friends of the Indians are
those who are ia favor ot compelling them
to work. Work la the salvation ot these
Indians and their only salvation. The leas-
the district In a brand new suit of store ing 0f lands has proved to be a great calam
clothes and hat. It was only a short time ity for a majority of them. It would be a
ago that the aged financier whirled Into the thousand times better for them If the leas-
street with a clinker-built auto, letting bis I ing of lands was prevented and the prop
annual pass on the Manhattan elevated go oeltion presented to them flatly to work er
to waste in bis pocket. These Alcibiadian I starve."
a nigger in trouble here," tne victim
shouted. To save her life, a hose was
turned upon her, until she could be pried
out by (he use of a couple ot boards.
Mrs. Morgan Is looking for an apartment
with folding doors.'
Uncle Russel Sage gave Wall street an
other surprise this week by appearing In
BIS CALM, GEXTLEMEN.
Barons of 'Watered Stock Agitated
sisid Irritated. . .
Detroit Free Press.
Whether the gods Intend to destroy the
coal road operators who are under Investi
gation by the Interstst Commerce com
mission in New York Is another question,
but those gentlemen of position and afflu
ence have certainly been made mad. It Is
sure that from the potnt ' of view taken
by all those of their class they are In'
hard lines. ' The Sherman law, which wsk
so long ridiculed as a dead letter, has eudT-1
denly been given a mighty significance.
The law can control the trusts and they
are In a feverish state of agitation.
Heaven forbid that any wrong should be
done the barons who water atock, wear
lightly tho requirements ot law, pay divi
dends and employ labor as they need It.
We would not take one Jot or tittle from
their Importance In the - upbuilding ot the
nation or the carrying out of the general
scheme of salvation. Our chief regret Is
that tbey appear to be losing their grip,
Unnn thA A t im It, ahntif whlrh the tiavM an
long hedged themselves, breaking forth
with the intensity of language and temper
that all the traditions of monopoly and re-'
spectability concede to the fishwife. Only
a day or two ago one ot the attorneys for
the road had a premature explosion ot
wrath that kicked like a rusty musket, and
now President Bair, holding a power of
attorney from the Ruler of the Universe,
has broken forth to. tell men that he is
tired, ot their lying. '. .,
It Is a sad state of nffalrs and one that
appeals to the sympathy of all good Chris
tians. Men who have, devoted their lives
to the beneficent work of stripping other
people of all riches that might prevent
their entering the kingdom ot heaven are
entitled to, . more - consideration, than Mr.
Baer and associates' re receiving. Never
theless, who shall say that. they have not
their reward? In some brighter and better
day, perhaps, their names will shine glori
ously In the Wall street maj-tyrology.
did not expect to go out of business It 'Ul foothold m Dou8Ia county and make feats of extravagance are causing no little This' will probably be discouraging to peo
Miles urges precaution against, also would be booming Benson In the . . OL e,ecuon 01 Kren aemocratlc comment on tne street, wnere r. sage nas p,e( who have longea "
.. . .. -I. . . . nudges this ran and a full democratic I always neen regaraea as a lainy economi-i to notiier ana Deuer iumik".
suggestion Is manifestly sound Interest of Howell. . . " " u IUU emocrauc ' t,.i,f ,J ,,... ,w .h red man i es-
It is to be presumed the matter The allied corporations have thus aeleaUon to the legislature next year. -eara ,:. wai had at a bargain in a sentlally' different from hie white brother?
lcmlfleamt Omission.
Brooklyn Eagle.
Senator Morgan says that the democratlo
party's principles have received the In
dorsement ot the country. , He did sot say
when.
POLITICS MARKS 8TRA.HQI BtD-FKLLOHS.
The Real Estate exchange, which
might, have rendered Omaha Invaluable
service In continuing the legitimate and
laudable campaign for equitable taxa-
tentlon of the enemy. This seems an
entirely reasonable view and should im
press Itself upon congress.
It Is not necessary to go Into an ex
tensive system of fortifications In the
Islands, but the Importance of having
The question that presents Itself to at ,east on strategic position strongly tion ia jn a far way 0f being split and
every taxpayer of Omaha Is not whom fortified Is perfectly obvious and as the J coming to pieces in Its vainglorious and
he would like to have voted for, but worK wm "Quire considerable time It futile attempt to boom Erastus Benson
anouia oe negun witnout unnecessary
delay. The fortifications at Manila are
said to be In very good condition and
with a few changes a fid additions will
be adequate. Equally strong works at
some other strategic point would prob-
Perlak tno Thomffht
Chicago Record-Herald.
When the kings of England and Italy met
they kissed each other four times. Let
us hope there la nothing to the theory
that germs may be carried In whiskers.
who among the candidates stands any
chance of election and who will be In
fluenced least by corporations and con
tractors.
into the mayor's office. In their en-
thnelasm the Bensonlan members of the
exchange seem to be oblivious of the
fact that they have put themselves In an
unenviable light before the community
by entering Into an alliance with the tax-
one Restful Snnday.
Baltimore American.
President Roosevelt went to church; lis
tened to a sermon, rode fifteen miles on
horseback against a high wind, talked to a
bunch ot people at a soldiers' home and
yet they persist la saylnge spent a rest-
iui sunaay.
Members of the original steel trust
syndicate have received 200 per cent ably be sufficient for the security of shirking corporations and tax-shirking
profit on their original Investment and the Islands against a foreign power and I jobbers who are arrayed against Moores
the bulk ot this enormous profit has
either been wrong out of the earnings
of labor or out of water coined Into
gold. In the end the consumer pays the
freight
The managers of the American Can
company are very much perplexed over I
the problem how to pay seven per cent
on $41,000,000 of preferred stock. That
Is precisely the problem that will con-
rront otner concerns that nave guar
anteed dividends or fixed Incomes on
super-lnflate4 stocks and bonds.
v ltn two or tnree Honorable excep
tions the federal office holders of Omaha
exhibit the same Indifference with re
gard to the success of their party In the
municipal campaign that they did lu the
campaign of 1900, when the republican
national committee had to set apart a
special fund for persuading disgruntled
federal office holders to vote the repub
lican legislative ticket; so as to Insure
the election of two republican United
States senators.
And now we are to have an astron
omy trust with all the star gazers and
eky prospectors of the world under one
general management, with a yiew to
making explorations of the heavens a
systematic business In which every
member of the trust will be given an
assignment Instead of promiscuously
roving about In universal space, trying
to discover new worlds and watching
for the appearance of long tailed and
short tailed comets.
moreover wguia oe valuable as a pro
tection to American sovereignty there.
SUM AFPRtBlXDID STR1KKS.
Today, It has been understood, would
witness the Inauguration of strikes by
organized labor In all the largo cities
of the country. It appears likely that
strikes will be less general than appre
hended. New York advices state that
employers and employes there for once
are of the same mind In desiring to
avoid any Interruption of work this
year and several of the largest building
trades have been granted their de
mands. Doubtless the other trades in
this line will get what they ask or come
to satisfactory terms with the em
ployers, so that no new difficulties with
labor are expected in that city. Re
ports from other .eastern points are
hardly less reassuring and indeed it
appears to be quite generally the case
that employers are disponed to follow
the example of those In New York and
grant the demanda of labor, where
these are shown to be fair and reason
able.
The deliberation that has been given
to this matter has evidently had the
result of creating very generally a con
servative sentiment Both Intelligent
worklngmen and the employers of labor
appreciate the fact that widespread
conflicts would be most disastrous to
every kind of business and would give
a severe check to the proxperlty and
progress of the country. There Is con
sequently greater willingness on both
sides to reach an amicable arrangement
from selfish motives under false pre
tenses and incidentally are trying to
puulsh the men who have brought relief
to the great majority of Omaha tax
payers by equalizing the assessments
between the corporations and the home
owners. '
In the battle for tax reform waged by
the exchange last year Erastus Benson
was not even a figurehead, lie was
distrusted by the men "who were In the
forefront of that battle and took no
active part either on the tax committee
before the Board of Review, before the
council or In the public arena.
The very fact that the mainstay of Mr.
Reason, outside of the exchange are the
allied corporations, who are furnishing
the sinews of war and all the merce
naries at their command to assist 'the
Benson boom, shows clearly that the
enemies which the exchange made In its
tax reforpj campaign have put that body
In position to club Itself to death.
The Real Estate exchange Bensonltes
have not only played Into the hands of
the corporate tax-shirkers and dis
gruntled jobbers whose assessments had
been raised by the Board of Review, but
are also exhibiting a lack of appreciation
of the services rendered by Mr. William
Hunter as a member of the Board of
Review. Mr. Hunter stood up courage
ously aud manfully against all the
pressure of the corporations and jobbers
to sustain the tax committee of the ex
change In Its efforts, but Instead of
recommeudlng Hunter to the voters the
Bensonlan exchange menitters have
Joined wllh members of the Municipal
Stranaro Scarcity ot Water.
Chicago Post.
A locomotive combine has been formed In
Great Britain embracing works that em
ploy 7,000 men and turn out 600 locomotlvss
a yesr. And Its capital stock la only $10,
000,000! There must be a severe drouth
over there.
Broadway store. ' He saw It In a window
marked 110.60 and admired It greatly. He
did not buy at once, but waited until the
early June days waned Into August, when
It was marked down to 18.73. Then he
Jumped la and bought It for cash.
A young man who was born on a ranch
and who, while getting his education In the
east, has turned westward again every
summer and baa thus maintained a fine,
strong physique, recently danced with a
young woman of some two hundred pounds,
in a village not far west ot Rahway,
reports the Evening Post. He noticed that
the danelng was uphill work, and, when It
was over, sank Into a chair In the Incipient
stages ot exhauation. The young woman
looked thoughtfully across the shining sur
face of the floor and threw a glance of In
vestigation at the corner where the punch
bowl stood.
"Doesn't It strike you that the floor Is
very sticky tonight?" she inquired.
The young man gallantly denied thinking
so.
'It seems so to me," the young woman
observed. Then she looked down at her
foot, protruding from a silken flounce, and
exclaimed:
"Why! I've got my rubbers on!"
Pnttlne; It on tho Clonda.
San Francisco Call. .
The Southern Pacific company seems to
have won the palm for the Invention ot the
most extraordinary excuse to evade respon
sibility for a train wreck. In a suit for
dsmagea recently tried ths company won
the case by accusing a cloudburst and fixing
blame upon It. n
Startling Innovation.
Baltimore American.
The police commissioner of New York
Is a very remarkable man. He declined
an Invitation to address a political meet
ing on the ground that as be had Issued or
ders to the force under his command to
keep out ot politics It was but duty to set
them ths exsmple. Such consistency
novel enough to touch on the revolu
tionary.
Silence Beat Becomes Him.
Indianaoolla Journal.
General Tyner expresses astonishment
that the postmaster general and other high
officials should have acted aa tbey did In
his case, and thinks they have lost their
heada. This Is probably because be has
lost his a humiliation be might have
avoided if he had not acted on bad advice
and permitted members of his family to
compromise him before the public.
Ten Contmnndnicnta Heafflraacd
Brooklyn Eagle.
Judge Grosscup'a decision Is not revolu
tionary. It merely comes at a revolutionary
time. There cannot be any serious danger
to business or to national prosperity In the
reaffirmation of the ten commandments In
a courthouse, with peosltles attached. That
la all the rebate decision amounts te. We
are not ao rotten that the enforcement of
plain honesty and fairness between ms Is
going te iuet ua
OVR PBOSPERITV PERMASEJtT.
Not a Note ot Pessimism Heard Any
where In the Last.
Kansas City Journal.
'I have been studying ths statistics of
our commerce tor twenty yesrs, and I havs
never known the time ia which they Indl
eated a greater activity in agriculture and
manufacturing, or In any of the producing
Industries, than at present."- Bo says O.
P. Austin, chief of the Bureau of Statls
tics ot the Treasury department. His con
elusions aa to all indications pointing to
a continued prosperity in this country are
fully supported by every authority that bas
considered the matter.
Railroad men, bankers, farmers, manu
facturers and wholesalers In all the large
business centers appear even more san
ulna than the statisticians. There is not
a note of pessimism anywhere in the land
The facts sre In accord with all these
cheerful predictions.
Exports for the twelve months ending
wlthMarch amounted to $114,000,000. Cot
ton and grain exports bave greatly In
creased over last year's figures. Exports
of Iron and steel, however, have slightly
declined, but tho authorities And in Ibis
fact a striking evidence ot prosperity. In
that ths horns demand tor these staples
has Increased and la greater tbaa the out
put of all the foundries and factories
working more days In the yesr tbsn ever
before.
If tbe well known axiom of political
economy be true, thst prosperity Is Indi
cated by the consumptive capacity ot a
nation, then this Incressed use of home
products, together with the tremendous
revenues of government from custom duties
far in excesa of previous years. Is a posi
tive proof that tks prosperity of ths United
States has come te star.
Is the Indian the only one wno can &
broaden out and progress In Idleness?
PERSONAL ROTES.
The Chicago police raided ten get-rlch-
qulck concerns last week. What a strenu
ous Job, this keeping the fool and his
money together.
Paris Is preparing a royal welcome for
King Edward, but It Is pretty certain that
be won't have aa good a time aa on soma ot
bis former visits.
Whether the door is kept open or closed
it seems to be pretty generally agreea
among shrewd observers that Adam Zad
will manage to steal the horse.
Count Montesflulou says the American
business man appreciates the ' beautiful as
he himself does. Whst Is more beautiful
than a $5 ticket to a $1.25 "conference" on
art?
t'nlted Statea Senator Daniel ot Virginia
said in a recent speech at Baltimore mat
the nineteenth century produced Ave aol
dlers to whom the world bas given the title
of great Napoleon, Wellington, Von
MoUke, Grant and Robert E. Lee.
On Monday last Joseph Jefferson, the
veteran af tor, visited the grave of bis fa
ther, Joseph Jefferson, in Magnolia ceme
tery, Mobile, Ala., and left a bunch of
roses upon tt. The elder Jefferson fell a
victim to the yellow fever during the epl
demlo Of 1842.
Joseph Chamberlain, who is regarded by
many Englishmen as one ot the cleverest
politicians In Europe, owes much of his
success In publlo life to the fact that be
has splendid capacity as a business man.
He is thus able to bring to besr on ques
tions ot high national or International Im
portance the trained mind and clear per
ception of a man of affairs.
"They all look up to J. P. Morgan down
here," asld a Wall atreet broker, "and any
one ot us would break our neck to get a
tip from him, but no one loves bim. There
Is not a msn who would not go up against
him snd break bim If he could. Not be
cause they bave anything against Mr. Mor
gan, but that's the spirit that rules In Wall
street. First, do up the public; second, do
up each other."
SMILING LINES.
do you believe In predestination?"
I don't b'lleve In none o dem
foods, no san.'
!Jane,
"No. sah
new-fangled breakfuea
Cleveland Plain Dealer.
The Broker Don't you find It easier to
shave some men than others?
The Barber Yes; don't you? Tonkers
Statesman.
"I'e glad to see all dla here philanthropy
goln' on." said Uncle Eben, "but I reckon
it's gwlnter be a good while befo' you sees
aa big a crowd at a free library as you
does at a base ball game." Washington
Star.
"Ixok, papa! The duke has brought h
coronet."
"Tell htm to m ahead and rilav it.
don't mind the noise." Brooklyn Life.
"You take orders from both the colonel
and Mrs. Allaore, do you, Gabriel? Don't
you know a man can't nerve two masters?"
"Ym. V kin hnia Vnn imt Ha . V. . a
mlnsuH tells ye, an you'll git along all
right." Chicago Tribune.
ths
'1
iisA
"That's a queer deitlgn you have In
corner of your billhead," said Slopay.
"It's merely a little flower," replied
tailor.
"Think that's appropriate?"
"Well, yes. It's a forget-me-not." Phils
aeipuia tr ress.
"I don't have any luck at all," growled
the burglar.
"Yoj didn't get caught when you broke
Into that Ust bank, did vvj?"
"No; I didn't get caught, but the rashler
had been there ahead of me." Chicago
Post.
Grace Why, Hthel? How could you tell
all the news In Mary's letter so soon? You
haven't even read It.
Ethel Well, you see. dear, I read the
postscript flrat. Yonkers Statesman.
"You told me Hlbbs was an accomplished
musician. He says he doesn't play any In
strument whatever."
"He's a musician, just the same. He un
derstands muxlc, and can tell good music
from bad. Can't a man be a good theologian
without being a preacher?" Chicago Tribune.
IN MAY.
John Burroughs In the May Century.
When grosbeaks show a damank rose
Amid the cherry blossom white.
And early robins nests dlaclnse
To loving eyes a joyous sight;
Whert columbines like living rnals
Are gleaming 'gainst the llchened rocks.
And at the foot of mossy boles
Are young anemones In flocks;
When gtnger-root beneath twin leaves
Conceals Its duoky floral bell.
And showy orchid shyly weaves '
In humid nook Its fragrant spell;
When dandelion's coin of gold
Anew Is minted on tha la.wn.
And maple trees their fringe unfold.
While warblers storm the groves at dawn
When these and more greet eye and ear,
Then strike thy tasks and come away;
It la the Joy-month of tha year,
And onward sweeps tbe tide of Msy,
Waltham Watches
They are carried
all over the world.
"TKt TerfecfeJ American Wsich," n GkstraieJ took
of Interesting information tboat uitxJiet, t& It tod
fret upon request,
American Wilihun Wtich Company,
Wtlifum, ibss.
s