Omaha daily bee. (Omaha [Neb.]) 187?-1922, September 04, 1898, Part II, Page 20, Image 20

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    -50 THE OMAHA DATLT BEE : SUXDAT , SEPTEMBER I , 1SOS.
; CHILIAN ! ) THE UNITED STATES
Eolations of the Two Countries as Viewed bj
the President of the Tornier.
NOTABLE TALK WITH PRESIDENT ERRAZURIZ
Tlio Miuiroc * Doctrine , .Men run lie
Canal anil Intercontinental Rail-
roml UlNiMiHKfil 1)5 tinHiail of
II 1'lllUrC'Nllt I ! ltUial > llc ! .
( Copyright , 1S03 , by Frank G. Carpenter. ]
SAMIAUO , Chill , Aug. . ' , IS9S. ( Special
Correspondence of Tlio Bee. ) It was by ap
pointment that I called upon the picsldctit
of Chill yesterday afternoon to have a chat
with Mm concerning matters of mutual In
terest to our respective countries. The
president Is ono of the progressive men of
this progressive people. He Is the head of
the liberal or progressive party , and IB at
the flout of every movement to make Chill
prosperous. He comes of one of the oldest
families of Chill , his father having been one
of the most popular presidents of the p.ist.
Ho Is a very rich man and his personal In
terests In the advancement of Chill are
great. Ho Is now In the second } eai of his
presidential term , and as ho has three jcars
more to serve his views upon International
matters arc of especial Interest. My audi
ence was arranged through our minister to
Chill , nnd at the tlino set for It , 2 p. m. ,
Mr. Wilson nnd mjEelf entered the doors
of tbo Moncda.
The Moncdn Is the Whlto House of Chill.
It Is a vast three-story building situated In
the beait of Santiago. You could put our
"White House" In ono corner of It , and Its
Kround floor Is. I Judge , larger than that of
the capltol at Washington. The bulldlnf
covers more than four acres , but It Is con
structed after the Spanish stle , with Its
rooms running about patios or courts , so
that there is much waste space. These
courts , however , are filled with flowers. In
some of them fountains play , and they form
the only gardens of the ptcsldent's home.
The Moneilo contains not only the offices
nnd tl'p private apartments of the president
but also tbo olUccs of several of the depart
ments of the government. He has his prln-
clrcl fnnlnot secretaries In the same house
with him , nnd a large part of the building
Is shin up to rlerlral work. As we entered
the Moncda wo passed tbo guard of soldiers ,
whtdi always slands there with drawn
ewords In their bands , and It was a military
olllrer In uniform who led us Into the pres
ident's room There Is a gre.it deal moro
pomp about public olllces 'here than In the
Vnited States , and the president of Chill
1m ; a military guard of 200 cavalry , which
tir"oiipanlcs his carriage on all state occa-
Hlons His carriage Itself Is far more pre
tentious than President MKlnloy's. . It la
drawn by four magnificent horses , and the
coachmen and footmen are dressed In gor
geous liveries.
Tin * I'rc-lilmt of Clilll.
We first met Don Edwardo Phillips , the
nshlstant secretary of state , and the chlel
medium of Intercourse between his cx-
colltncy and foreigners. Ho told us that the
president was expecting us , and a moment
later we were In the president's room. This
Is larger than any of the business rooms
of the Whlto House. It Is rather plainly
furnished , and It was at the back of it
thpt President Errazurlz was sitting nt a
desk vhlch was Uttered with papers and
documents Ho rose as wo came In and
Bhonk my band as I was presented to him.
I was rather surprises ! to find him sc
young a man Hj ilocs not appear to be
over -10 , and ns yet there are no graj
strunda In his hair. Ho Is of slender build ,
but very straight. Ho has a rather dark ,
hut handsome face , and his manner IE
quite dlcnlfied. His excellrny asl.ed us to
bo seated , and. tnMni ; a chair beside us ,
rhntt'-il for half an hour very entertain-
Inch- one of his friends , Mr. Edwardo
MacOlure acting as Interpreter. As we
, T ( sc , to go , however , he said bo would prefer
Qufcv should write out my questions , and
fioo fiild glvo mo his answers In writing ,
torpr 'lr ' > Mas "Inco done , and the matter
jH. h follows Is made up of the questions
| (
. th translation of the Spanish document
1 'avo lust received from the presidential
mnilnn
Correspondent Will your excellency
jpUnse state whit Is the nosltlon of Cblll
is to trade with the United States , and
sucgert Pome wa > s In which It might be
Increased '
11 The President Among the best meas
itrcs to Inpiraso this trade- would bo the
stnbllBhmcnt of no\v Btenmshlp lines. There
phould bo moro frequent steamship com
munication between the two countries. An-
'other method that might be adopted tc
further trade would be the estibllshnienl
lof expositions to show the respective- pro
ducts of the countries Chill should have
Biich expositions In the United States , and
tht > United States should establish them in
Phlll I think that the consumption ol
faltrato In the United States might also ba
{ stimulated by practical experiments anl
hctlvo propiganda.
Correspondent There Is now mud
( American capital seeking foreign Invest'
( ment. What are the chances for such capl-
ital In Chill' Is foreign capital so InvchteL
( safe , and what especlnl fields now otter thi
i bc t opportunities foi profit ?
Tlu. Pi esldent There are a number ol
Investments In Chill which will yield gooil
.profit to foreign linestors. Among them
are banking establishments , the working ol
I the nitrate llelda , the exposition of minerals ,
nnd especlnllj the development of our gold ,
copper and slher mines. As to whethei
i American cnpltiil is safe In Chili , I would
I Bay that all foreign capital circulates here
f subject to the sniuo conditions as native
ll"apltal without other risks or other bur-
Wens to bear , and that American capital maj
( enjoy In Chill all of the advantages that arc
njoco ti > capital from any other source
Coi respondent How about the conccs-
Blons which the government offers to capi
talists for tbo establishment of steel am
( Iron Industries ?
The President Congicss recently came
to the assistance of persons Interested Ir
the iron business , but this does not meat
the protection of any monopoly In favor ol
native capital Any rcponslblo foreign com
pany will iliul equal protection under oui
laws and customs.
Canal anil RnHna ) .
Correspondent What does jour cxccllenc ;
think of the Nicaragua canal , which , as yoi
know , the United States Is about to build ?
The Pii-sldent I consider the proposal o
\ the United States to open the Nlcaragu :
canal as worthj of high praise I am I :
favor of It or of any other undertaklni
Vvvblch. will facilitate communication betwcci
tthe west coast of South America and tin
lUnltcd States and Europe. Every advance
niont of this kind will bo of especial ad
'vantage ' to such an essentially marltlra
'country ' as ours. (
„ { Correspondent Chill la the chief rallroai
I builder among the countries on this side o
the Andes It built the first railroad 01
the continent , and I would like an oxprcs
felon from jour excellency as to what jou
1 people think of the Intercontinental rail
r ay Is U a practical scheme and will I
/over be built ?
: The President Chill applauds every move
'picnt toward the completion of the Inter
ttcoutlnental railway , but she considers thn
nil Is still a long way off On her own part
qChlll U endeavoring to extend her railway
jjfrum one end of the country to the other
Ilk'r territory U very long It Includes i
\llTg \ part of the Pacific coast line of thi
n , < ontlncnt , and her railroads will contrlbuti
to a certain extent to the proposed Inter
continental railway. I think the advantages
of this proposed International line will beef
of great Importance to all Interests.
Itnllrnnil O\rr thr Amir * .
After this the Interview continues as follows
lows-
Correspondent How about the Transan-
( loan railway which Is to connect the At
lantic and Pacific oceans , running from
Valparaiso to Buenos Ayres ? I understand
that Chill will complete If
Thrf President The Trantandean railway
Is a woik which has been carefully studied
In Cblll and It has been steadily protected
As you know , less than fifty miles of road
nre yet needed to complete It and part of
this Is on Chilian and part on Argentine
soil At present , on account of the extraor
dinary demands of the companies proposing
to finish the work , the road Is belnc more
carefully considered. There are some dim-
cullies In the way of Its extension along thb
lines proposed , but It will be without doubt
continued as soon as these difficulties are
removed
Correspondent How about the rallwas
that Chill Is building In the south ? I un
derstand they will open up much new coun
try which will be available to Immigrants.
The Picsldcnt The southern rnllwns era
destined to be of great advantage to Chill.
They will give easy access to the richest
agilcultural regions of the country. They
will glvo a gient Impulse to the establish
ment of agrlcultuial colonies and will stim
ulate Immigration. Chill earnestly desires
Immigration and as far as lies In its power
endeavors to encourage it. It considers It
one of the chief factors of Its progress.
We need moro people In Chill nnd we have
here n country which , If properly cultivated ,
would support many times our present pop
ulation.
Tin- Monroe Doctrine.
After a question as to tbo nitrate deposits
which the president answered by salng
that the Investigations show that they will
last for a long time yet , I asked his ex
cellency what Chill thought of the Monroe
doctrine. This was a rather delicate ques
tion , as many people down here think that
the United States v.lshcs to control the
policy of the two continents. His written
answer , however , was ns follows-
"The International policy of Cblll has al
ways tended toward the maintenance of
peace and the strengthening of her political
and commercial relations with the nations
of the American continent , and I believe
that this policy does not depart from one ol
the phases , perhaps the most important one
of the Monroe doctrine. "
Correspondent Will the neiidlnir ques
tions between Olilll and the Aigentlno be
amicably adjusted or is there likely to be a
conlllct of nrniH ?
The Proa'dent I nm confident that the
matters now pending between the Argentine
and Chill will be peaceably arranged and I
believe that both governments are anxious
that they should be ? Y'jls closes the Inter
view.
How Clilll In C < n erneil.
Chili is a republic , but there are a num
ber of differences between Its constitution
and that of the United States. The Chilian
president Is elected for five ) ears Instead
of four , nnd he Is not eligible for a second
term. The presidential election day Is June
25 of the fifth year of each presidency ant ;
inauguration day Is September 18 , of th (
same ) car. Both of these dates are In the
winter months , nnd the 18th of Scptembfi
Is also the Chilian day of Independence cor
responding to our Fourth of July. The prea.
Ident of Chill gets a salary of $18,000 , and
ho has in addition an allowance of $12,00 (
for expenses. This Is , howver , In Chlliat
mono ) , so that it Is equal just now to nol
moro than $11,000 In American gold. Presi
dent ErraztirU probably spends severa !
times this sum every jcar. The presldenl
has the veto power as our president has
but his veto can be overridden by a two-
thlids mnpority of the members of congresi
present at the time the measure Is brought
back , and the political situation Is such tha
when a presidential measure falls It Is
usually the custom for the cabinet to re-
Bli > n , so that Chill has a now cabinet , I en
fold on the average once a month. In ad
dition to his cabinet , which Is made up ol
ministers after much the same lines as
those of our cabinet , the Chilian presldenl
has a council of state consisting of five i/iem
bers appointed by himself and six chosen b )
congress.
Tin * riilllan CoiiKrrnH.
Chilians cannot vote until they are 2 ;
i years of age It they are unmarried , bill
married men can vote at the ago of 21
Members of the House of Deputies , whlcl
corresponds to our house of representatives
must have an income of 100 sterling f
I ) ear , and senators must each have Incomes
1 of 100 , or $2,000 a ) car. Congress sits Ir
regular session from June 1 until Septembei
1 every year , but the president can call ar
extra session whenever he chooses. Th <
building known as the house of congress \\as
burned a ) ear or so ago and Is now bclnf
rebuilt. It was and will bo the finest buildIng -
Ing in Santiago. It covered a full square
of ground and lookexl not unlike some of oui
great buildings nt Washington , save that li
was made of brick covered with a terra cotlr
stucco Instead of granite or marble. The
walls of the building still stand and withlr
a short time It will again be ready for occu
pancy. At present the lower house Is meetIng -
Ing in one of the halls of the Unlversltj
or Santiago , and the senate holds Its session !
In ono of the buildings devoted to this gov
ernment departments. The sessions of coti'
gross are often very stormy. The Chilian'
nre fond of politics , and ) ou will hear more
political talk hero In a day that you heal
In Washington In a week. There are twe
great political parties , the conservatives am
the liberals , each of which has a numbci
of subdivisions The conservatives are thi
more compact , but tbo liberals are much tlu
more numerous , and they are represented
by the party now In power They are the
progressive party and they advocate populai
education , the elevation of the masses am
everthing modern. The conservatives art
more what their name Implies , and thej
Include also the clerical or church element
which hero In Chill has enormous Inllu-
ice.
Church mill State In Chill.
One of the curious divisions of the presl-
| dent's e-abinet Is the branch or department
of "worship and colonization " Catholicism
Is the slate relig on and the Catholic church
receives a certain amount every ) car from
the government treasury. Nearly all of the
Chilians are Catholics and all church affairs
of note are attended by tho'government
otficlals On the Chilian anniversary ol
Its "day of Independence" the presldint and
all of his officials , Including the officers of
the array and navy , attend church The
oilier day a celebrated bishop , who had
been dead for I don't know how long , was
honoied with a new monument In the
cathedral of Santiago , nnd this was made
the occasion of a great celebration. I went
In company with the American minister
and found that nearly all of the foreign
diplomats were present. The president , the
general of the army and the admiral of the
navy were there In their official dress and
I during the ceremonies all kneeled again
and again In uulbou with the priests and
other church dignitaries. I nm told , how
ever , that within recent years other re
ligions have been moro tolerated by Chill
than almost any other South American
country. There are two large American
Fchools here In Santiago , ono supported by
j the Methodist and the other by the Prcsby-
I tcrlan churches of the United States , and
there nro other missionary colleges and
churches In different parts of the country.
These are tolerated , however , on the
'grounds : of inodtrn progress rather than
from any desire of the Chilians to change
their religion The ) are. I believe , satisfied
| with Catholicism , though the educated
Chilian man does not llko the way In
| which the church meddles with political
mailer ! ) HP < 1or < ) not go to church except
on Sundays and ( east days , anil , like many
other men outside of Soutb America , ho
letves most of the church rxerclscs to Ills
wife and daughters The women of Chill
are one of the strongest elements In up
holding Catholicism and Its Inlluence. They
are very devout You see them In the
churches rek day and Sunday kneeling on
the stone lloors and saying their prnyets.
You meet them on the streets golnn to con
fession or mass , each carrying n prayer rug
In one hand and a iirnjcr book In the other ,
and If you will enter the rhurchcs jou may ,
perhaps , see n pretty devotee who will look
nt > ou out of the tall of her c > c ns she
mumbles her prajers v , Ith a cross old
duenna In the background. As In Peru and
Bolivia. the women In Chill wear solid black
when the ) go to church They cover their
heads with black mnntas , and a church
congregation makes jou think of a nunnery
with nil of tbo nuns clad In black. In
deed , to wear white at such times Is a sign
of grief and shame rather than of purity
and joy. It Is tbo custom for women who
have done wrong to put on white- clothes
and ehroud their heads In white shawls to
show- that they are penitent and art re
solved to be good for the future I have
seen sc\eral very pretty girls so dressed
and as they passed have thought of Haw-
thorno's story of the "Scarlet Letter , " and
wondered If in some cases there should not
bo a. priest walking beside them
Worth S100 , 000,000.
The Catholic church here Is enormously
wealthy. I ha\e heard It said that Its prop
erty In Santiago alone Is worth moro than
an hundred million gold dollars. It has some
of the best business blocl.s of the cit > . The
whole of one aide of the Plaza , which Is the
very center of the most valuable of Santiago
business property , Is taken up by the pal
ace of the archbishop and by the cathedral ,
and there Is other property all about this be
longing to the church It has acres of
stoics , thousands of rented houses and \ast
haciendas upon which wine and other
things are made for sale Nearly all of
tills Is controlled by the archbishop , al
though much of the church property Is held
by 'ts different organizations. The Car
melite nuns of this city are the richest body
of women In South America , If not In the
world. They ha\o whole streets of rented
houses near their nunnery and own also
largo farms , which bring them In n steady
Income. These nuns never allow their faces
to be seen by men , and If for any reason
men must bo cmplojcd In the nunnery for
the making of repairs , etc , the nuns
shroud their forms and heads In thick black
cloth when passing by them. Of course no
ono Is admitted to the convent proper , but
tJirniipb n frlonil who has some Influence
with them I was admitted to the beautiful
chapel which they have established for the
use of their employes and outsiders. In
getting the permission wo talked with the
nuns , though we did not see them. Our
speaking tube was a dumb waiter , and the
voice that came down was singularly sweet ,
and as I heard It utter the soft musical
Spanish It seemed to mo a shame that It
should , as ts the rule of the establishment ,
be confined to a whisper.
The Dominican Friars also own millions
of dollars' worth of property In Santiago.
I walked for blocks past houses every
one of which I was told belong to them and
paid them rent monthly. They dress In
black bats and gowns , with soft whlto flan
nel undergoing , and they look quite- Im
posing as they fling themselves along the
streets. Their church Is perhaps the finest
In Santiago It Is almost n cathedral In
sbo and appearance , and Us altar Is one
of the most beautiful on this hemisphere.
AVhen the altar was ordered from Europe
the size of the church was not considered ,
and when It arrived It was found that It
was too big for the church. The good friars
did not know what to do for a time , but , as
the altar had cost thousands of dollars ,
they concluded to build a new church. Hero ,
howe\cr , another mistake was made. It
was found that the church had been en
larged too much , and that the space left
for the altar was now as much too big as
It had formerly been too little. They filled
In the space , however , with other material ,
so that today the costly altar looks rather
patch ) ' , after all.
all.PRANK
PRANK Q. CARPENTER.
II.I.S M3AII AM ) PAH.
Will T. Hale.
I'veno objection to the one who has the
tears to bpare ,
A-vvofp ir over misery beneath some fur-
Rut secerns to mo here close to homo that
sorrow s not so rare
T1"\.t \ ? ? , can , look an > s ° o no wrong , an1
llstnln' , hear no sigh.
Wy , north an' south an' east an' west ,
there's merit clothed in rags ,
An Innui cnro alone , alone , while lust laya
Wh" °
If folks have feelln's that extend to woes
ne.ir an' away ,
All well an1 good-but I'm afeared they
tnktf lee long a Btrlde
rnat tlmrli ) a the best that helps the weak
that round us lay ,
Nor llko the Lovlte passes by "upon the
'inn oi.
John W. Ma > nard , who recently died In
Michigan , was the man who succeeded In
having the state university located at Ann
Arbor , where ho and his family donated
the land for It.
Thomas Tucker Wise , fleet paymaster of
the British navy , who died not long ago ,
was bom In 1804 and was said to be the
oldest nion In her majesty's navy ,
I Idiuis Poiothv Iiurrln , whoso death Is
announced from Concord , N. II. , was prob-
Ubl } ttlCt 111 St WHillj kliOUIl btuihtl u .Oug
tbo eighteen socluies In America. She
earao to the Shakers at Canteibury when
she was only S joirs old.
Loicl Uuftcrln , who Is now more than 70 ,
Is taking up the study of Persian with a
zest equal to that of Cato , for whom , at
SO. the study of Clrcek had no terrors. His
attainments ns a linguist are already great ,
but ho is desirous of adding the poetic and
figurative Pcisian language to his stock of
knowledge , and Is making progrcsss in It.
Mrs. Nancy Ifurger IB the oldest patriot
In New Jersey. She has lived 107 years ,
' and her home Is In a quaint little log cabin
on a mountain clearing sl\ miles south of
Uellefi nto Her husband , George Burger ,
a strapping forgcman. fell fighting on Commodore -
modoro Perry's flag ship in the grtvu naval
victory on Lake Erie In the War nf jLfitg ,
her two eldest sons were killed at the bat
tle of Antletnm , and now her grcat-grand-
' eon. a boy of IS years , ts serving In the
present war as a member of the rifth
I'ennsjlvania volunteers , at ChlcUamauga.
Grandmother Burger recently became the
1 recipient of n pension of $12 a month , with
tbo largely accumulated back pay. Her
son Samuel , aged 70 years , resides wlfhher.
TO OMAHA.
\vondrous city of the plain ,
Where onro the red man pitched his tent ,
1 Where wivage war cries o or the slain ,
To trackless wilds their terror lent.
Now all Is changed from pathless wood ,
Most beauteous scenes bcforo us He ,
Where lowly frontier cub'ns ' stood ,
Our pennants proud on mansions lly.
Hero made wand ban spent Its might ,
I Ah ! Palaces In truth arise.
Here groined arch In heavenward flight ,
And turrets climb unto the sklcn.
Her nolden court hero Ceres holds ,
Pamnna hero her empire sways ,
Here Tlora In her nmplo folds
Heneus again her ancient days.
Hero art * ias built her latest nhrlne ,
And lavl h pours her treasures forth ,
Horn wealth of Held and vvoalth of mine ,
Are garnered up from south and north.
Hero gathers strength to Freedom's cause ,
Here pence and xlatelv order reign ,
Hero lovaltv to self-made laws.
Here Justine rules ho wide < lnmaln
-M VON HOHHNFEI.S.RnTNHARDT.
Chlcaco. III.
IA1 * ( I\ I T"I"PIM1 PPniACMTIl'P
DEAD LEI TEH llRlOSlllLS
Exhibit in the Government Building of
Special Interest.
VETERAN RECOVERS AN OLD PHOTOGRAPH
Exposition Soinrnlr 1'oMnl Cnriln ,
Without Any Aililrt-NM , Are Aortiiiiii-
Unildlj | at HitMr it n eli 1'oM-
Ollloe mi ( lie liround ,
An exhibit possessing as much dramatic
Interest as an ) In the Government building
is the collection of photographs Edit by
soldiers of the civil war to friends at home ,
and which by reason of Incomplete address
never reached their destination. At the end
of the war the Postolllce department hod
on hand 5,000 photographs of this sort , which
wore placed on exhibit at the dead letter
ofllco in the hope that they would be
Idontltlcd by visitors. In the years which
followed 2,000 of them have been claimed
by those for whom they were Intended , and
there \vero many pathetic and dramatic
Incidents In connection with their discovery.
Wives and sweethearts came across the
pictures of loved ones who bad disappeared
without a word , and It was possible by the
Index on the photographs to put them in
possession of the letters which had been at
tached Tor some time after the war these
Identifications were of almost dally occur
rence , but In the last ton- } ears such dis
coveries have been growing less and less
as the ante-bellum generation has faded
away and the soldier boys of the civil war
have outgrown their appearance at that
time.
Although the collection has been exhibited
at all the recent expositions. Identifications
of the pictures have been of rare occurrence ,
and the department has given up hope of
locating the greater part of those remainIng -
Ing During the last three months several
of the collection have been partially
Identified by people who Imagined they saw
a likeness to some person they knew , but
In only one case has the assurance been suf
ficient to justify the ofllcial lu charge In
surrendering the portrait.
Identifies n PliotoKrnpa ,
On August 13 Miss Gorman , daughter of
J. J. Gorman , assistant superintendent of
the Omaha Street railway company , was
examining the cabinet of war photographs
when shr > came upon one which she lecog-
nlzed as her father's. It had been sent in
a letter from the military camp at Indian
apolis , Ind. , to his family at South Bend ,
Ind. , shortly before Mr. Gorman's regiment
had been ordered to the front He left
shortly afterward for tbo south , and had
no opportunity to communicate with his
friends for a long Interval. The letter had
miscarried , and the photograph had oc
cupied Its place In the dead letter exhibit
for over thirty-five years. Colonel Urovvn-
low , In charge of the exhibit , has received
tbo following acknowledgment from Mr
Gorman :
W. G. Drovvnlow Dear sir : I received to
day from my daughter the photograph that
she found at the Government building at the
exposition grounds. It Is the same I sent
through the mall when I was In the arm > .
I belonged to the nighty-sixth Indiana vol
unteers. Company D , and I am greatly
obliged for the return of the picture.
J. J. GORMAN
The dead letter exhibit contains a vast
number of other relics which have ac
cumulated owing to the haste and care
lessness of the American people As an
example of these traits there Is a collection
of souvenir exposition postals which have
been mailed at the branch office In connec
tion with the exhibit , and which can never
bo delivered. Over 100 have been mailed
In the last three months , an average of
over three dally , containing Interesting
communications on ono side , and on the
other no address whatever. Most of these
are from country people anxious to send
word to their friends , but who are In too
nervous a state to attend to the detail of
Inscribing the address. Most of them are
signed "Father , " "Brother , " or "Your
Loving John , " and hcnco there Is no way
of locating the senders.
C'onflNciitcs n Ilomb.
One of the most Interesting specimens In
the postofiico exhibit Is a bomb addressed
to Seuor Don Antonlus Eulato. commander
of the Vizcaja , Intended to bo derivcred to
him while his ship was anchored In New
York harbor. The package excited the
suspicion of the department , which was on
the lookout for matter of the sort , and
had used Its privilege of opening anything
In the form of a package addressed to
parties liable to suffer at the hands of
fanatics. The bomb , which bad evidently
been sent by some enthusiast in the cause
of Cuba's freedom , was made of a strong
pasteboard box , and contained enough dyna-
nilto to wreck a ship. The package of
course never i cached Its destination.
Another Inferesting death machine was .
revolver contained in a box wilb thr
y
ger so connected that the weapon v\ > , >
discharged in the direction of the ' * -
undoing the lid. It bad been deslgueu „ >
a rejected suitor In Baltimore , Md. , whose
proposals had not been favorably received
by an heiress of that city. lie accordingly
mailed her the Infernal machine , which she
opened without harm , as the suitor had
proved a poor machinist , and the trigger
connection had not been well adjusted.
A number of piactlcal jokes have also
found their way Into the collection which
the Intended recipient was too acute to
accept The method usually used Is to
send some ponderous piece of freight , llko a
brick , with the postage Insufficiently paid.
The person for whom It Is Intended Is no
tified by the department that a package ad
dressed to him Is held for postage , and the
amount Is usually forwarded to the sup-
pos > ed satisfaction of the Joker. The amount
of postage collected on such goods some
times amounts to several dollars.
One envelope In the collection contains aleck
lock of Gultcau's hair , which ho sent to a
wealthy widow In New York , from whom ho
j hoped to obtain assistance. The woman
had gone to Europe , however , and after
following her for some time on her travels
the token landed In the dead letter olllce.
Under another case Is a valuable porce
lain tra ) , containing a painted landscape
burned Into the surface with remarkable
skill It Is the work of a famous Russian ,
and Is valued at several hundred dollars ,
but was Bent by parties traveling abroad
! with an erroneous address.
A curious method of sending money
through the malls was adopted by n Georgia
mau who wished to remit $1 to the director
of the geological survey for a Manual of
Topographical Methods. Ho pasted paper
on both sides of the coin , writing the ad
dress on one side , with the stamp , and the
order on the other. The communication
reached Its destination.
Every two > cars a grand auction sale Is
conducted at Washington to dispose of the
accumulated merchandise. The articles on
hand are done up In packages containing
general Information na to the contents , and
bids are received either at the sale or pre
viously from th list catalogue. The pur
chase Is farpply a lottery , and It Is found
tbflt the articles bring CO per cent moro
when Bold on only a partial knowledge of
their character.
You dlsappoplntment when you ex
periment. HeWltl's Little Early Risers nre
pleasant , easy. thoroiiRh little pills. Thev
euro constipation nnd sick headache just us
sure as you take them.
Captain Jonathan Norton , reputeJ to be
Just dosing hl 101st year , aided In raising
the Stars and stripes on a new clgo * > foot
I pole In the publ1" park In East Lee , Mats ,
I after the surrender of Santlaco.
New effects in
A FINE ASSORTMENT OF CHAIRS , TABLES , SIDEBOARDS'
CHINA CLOSETS , BUFFETS , ETC , IN
i ,
Dining Room
Chairs ,
126 Designs
65c to $20 Each ,
EXTENSION TAHLIJS.
76 now patterns in round iuul square.
$4.00 TO $125.00 EACH ,
Furniture Co. ,
1115-1117 Farnam Street , Omaha. SIDEBOARDS ,
117 Different Styles ,
Established J864. $10 TO $240.00 EACH
BLOOD
A SPECTALTV
Primary , Secondary or Tertiary
BLOOD POISON permanently
Cured in 15 to 35 Days.
You can be treated at home for same
price under same guaranty If you
prefer to come here we will contract
to pay railroad fare And hotel bills ,
and no charge if we fall to cure.
IP YOU HAVE
taken mercury. Iodide potash and still
have aches i id pains , Mucous Patches
In mouth , Sore Throat , Pimples , Cop
per Colored Spots , fleers on any part
of the body. Hair or I'ycbrowg falling
out. It Is this secondary
I I I
exd tea tmal
we uuaranfeo to t ;
We pollclt the most obstinate cases
and challenge the world for a case we
cannot cure This disease has always
bullied the skill of the moat eminent
pbjslc'nns '
J"i6u,00o capital behind our uncondi
tional guaranty Absolute proofs ? ent
sealed on application , 100 page book
sent free.
AlfclreN * COOIC IIKMHDY CO. , 1401
MnHonlc Temple , Chlcnun , III.
And Only Genuine.
SAFE ilntr * relUU LAOit
l > ru dit fur CAichetiert Ftipttt'i
> ( In l p < t ted ( * * IJ
bo id SLAlaJ w | ( & blue rihbou ao
J no other. rtfnt ding from ivbtt- - *
imntand imitation * Atlr lif cr ieod4e.
la M pi ft r j rllealr , t itlmoaUU to *
, * * Hller for io < tlpm'MiiIrrbr by rttara
f „ Mall. 1O.OOO JeillmonUli ITameMprr. .
I Chloirti ! > r CUerulcal Co. , M-dU t q ,
boU bj & 11 LocH DrujSliU. I'll 1 L M ) , I' A !
STENCILS !
BADGES ,
terms
Man1. !
rr
Patronize
Home Industries
lly I'lirrlinsliin Cixxls 1111110 at HitKol -
loitlnu : M liranltii l'actoritMi
AWNINGS AND TENTS.
i oMMiv Tivri KLiiitnit co.
I ( Successors Omaha Tent and Awning Co )
Manufacturers tnits , awnings , jobbers la-
illes' and prnts' Mackintoshes. Tents for
r -nt. 1311 Farnam St , Omaha.
BREWERIES.
OMtllV imUAVIMi ASSOCIATION.
Carload shipments made In our own re
frigerator cars llluo Ribbon , Elite Export ,
Vienna Export and Family Export deliv
ered 3 all parts of the city
BOILERS
OMAHA llOII.EIt WORKS ,
.tons u. i.oxvnnv , i rop.
Boilers , Tanks and Sheet Iron Work
Special facilities for doing repairs , etc. Tel
ephone 1309
CORNICE WORKS.
j. p. IPIMTIR.
nvca.i : CORMCI : WORKS.
Manufacturer of Galvanized Iron Cornices
Galvanized Iron Slt > lights Tin , Iron and
Slate Rooting Airent for Klnni'ar s Sttul
Celling. 10S-10-12 North Eleventh street.
FLOUR MILLS.
S. P. ( .11.MAN.
Flour , Men ! . Feed , Bran , 1013-15-17 North
17th street , Omaha Neb. C E. Blatk , Man
ager. Telephone E9J
IRON WORKS
DAMS A. ( OUCH.I. , IKON WORKS.
Iron anil I'mnn rounder * .
Manufacturers and Joblx rs of Machinery.
General repairing a spcilaltj 1501 , 130J niid
ILu'i JmlvBon .suict , umaiia ,
LINSEED OIL
WOODMIN LINSEED Oil , WORKS.
Manufacturers old process raw Unseed oil ,
kettle boiled Unseed oil , old procnsH ground
linseed cakes , ground and screened flaxseul
for clruggltta OMAHA. NEB ,
OVERALL AND SHIRT FACTORIES.
K \ TMJI..NS tUMI'AM.
Mfrs. Clothing , Pants , Shirts , Overalls.
OMAHA. NEB
SHIRT FACTORIES
.1. u. iv \s.
MIIII.\SIC.V blllllT LO.MPA.NY.
in Omaha
are to be found In
Omaha's Palace Office Building
Strictly fireproof
E ectric light by clay and night
Periect ventilation
Day and all night elevator service
Steam heat
All Modern Conveniences.
The best janitor service in the city. Offices rented at reason *
able rates. Prices include light , heat , water
and janitor service.
Directory of Bee Building Tenants :
GROUND FLOOK
E. STRINGRR , Real Estate and Rentals
tORCST LA\\N CUMHTUIIY ASSOCIA
TION.
UUG BUILDING B\KBUR SHOP , Fred
I lluelow , 1'ioprlctor.
'
JOHN ICiiIUNNY. The Lobby.
IFIRST
i nnn BUSINESS OKPICE.
OMAHA WATER COMPANY.
SUPERINTENDENT UEE BUILDING.
SECONE
HUGH MURPHY , Contractor.
DR. HIPPLi : , Dentist.
DR. DAVIS
C S. ELG UTTER. Law Onico.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE READING ROOMS.
NORTHWESTERN MUTUAL LIKE IN
SURANCE CO. , Jehu Steel. Gen. Agent.
THIRD
CANTON BRIDGE CO , Ward & Tovvle ,
Western Agents.
PR MURIAKTY , OeulHt and AurHt ,
Dr. R. A. MITTELSTADT , Dentist.
II. W PATRICK , Law Olllce.
, DR O S HOFFMAN.
EQUITY COURT ROOM NO. 6.
U W , SIMERAL , W.M , SIMERAL. Law
Olllccs.
WEBSTER , HOWARD & CO. , Fire Insur-
I anco.
THE OMAHA LOAN AND BUILDING A9.
SOCIATION , G. M. Nattlngcr , Secretary.
MUTUAL LOAN AND BUILDING ASSO
CIATION
ROBERT I R1TCIIARD , Loans.
R. E. CAMPBELL. Court Rotunda , Cigar *
and Tobacco.
FLOOR.
WESTERN UNION TELEGRAPH OF-
FICE.
J B. SMITH , Paving Contractor.
FLOOR.
DH. CHARLES ROSEWATER.
EQUITABLE LIFK ASSURANCE S0
C1ETY.
READ & BECKETT , Attorneys.
DR. A. K DETWILER.
NEW HYGIENE INSTITUTE.
VI OOR
Dr. S. J. QUINBY.
\ I VVI COVIl' VV
OMAHA WHIST CLUB.
Dr. AQNES V. S WETLAND. .
PACIFIC MUTUAL LIFE INS. CO. , A. 7.
To Id General Agt-nt.
PROVIDENT SWINGS LIFE ASSUR.
ANCE SOCIETY OF NEW YORK , M. l-\
Rnhr < .r. Agent.
THE GR\NT PAVING COMPANY. Street
Pavements ami ttldcnalks , John Grant ,
Siipuuiieiidcni.
FOURTH FLOOR.
F J SUTCLIFFE. Stenographer. THE BANKERS UNION OF Tim
FIDELITY MUTUAL LIFE ASSOCIA WORLD.
TION , PHILADELPHIA , PA. , Wm. II. OMAHA r-OAL EXriIANGE.
Blown , Manager. WASHINGTON LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY -
DR. FREDERICK F. TEAL. PANY , New York : F C. Tym , Gen. Agent.
NASON S. NASUN. Dentists. CHARLES L THOMAS , Real Estate.
H. B. BOYI.K3 , School of Stenography. PENN. MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO.
G W.SUE3 & CO. , Solicitors of Patents. DEXTER L. T1IOMA.H. Real EsUte.
PROVIDENT LIFE AND TRUST COMPANY '
DR HANC'HETT.
PANY , Philadelphia ; A. Lansing , General , A. R Cl'YLER Ki CO. . Dentists' Supplies.
Agent. EQUITY COURT. Room No. 7.
DR L A. MERRIAM. THE ROYAL OAKS
C E.ALLEN Knights of the Forest. '
BANKERS' LIFE INSURANCE CO. , ot
JOS. R CLARKSnV
Des Molnes , Wm. Ive , Goa'l. Agt.
CLINTON II. BRIGGS.
CENTRAL LIFE I.NaURANCE CO. A. R JONNECTICNT MUTUAL LIFE IN8UR-
EdmlBton , General Agent. ANCE CO , John Sylvan Uruwn , Gen.
FLOOR.
ARMY HEADQUARTERS-DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI. ,
SIXTH FI/OR
W T GRAHAM. iCHAS E WILLIAMSON. Agent.
WM. ' ' G. URE MANIT . \r-TURERS' AND CONSUMERS'
BEE EDITORIAL ROOMS ASSOCIATION
BEE COMPOSING ROOMS. O E TURKINC.TON. Attorney.
II 8 GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE. MUTUAL RE.SRRVE FUND LIFE ASSN.
STATE Ml'Tt'XL LIFE 1NSURNl'E CO. WESTERN COMMERCIAL & ADJUST.
Worcester , Mass , J. W. Cnilg , ( , ' < n Agt. MENT CO.
SEVENTH FLOOR.
ROYAL ARr\NM'M LOUOE ROOMS.
11UOM 105. roil RATES , KTC. , APPLY TO THIS