Omaha daily bee. (Omaha [Neb.]) 187?-1922, February 10, 1895, Part III, Page 19, Image 19

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_ _ _ . .Crn _ } U\HA' LY DEE : SUNDAY . , FEnn.UARY ; .rio , " ' 189 i. . 19
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WHEN HEARTS ARE TRUMPS
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Facts fad Fancies \ ! Woven Around 8t.
Valentino's ' Day
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POPULAR AMONG A lU5Y PEOPLE
2taw and ovcJIIIIOVltloo In "n\cnUne , .
l'rllellrnl n Well RR Srllthllf'lIta\-
. " ; ; ugarallnnl Ho"rlIn/ : At-
tr"etl"o TrillcR
.1
Americhns : are a practical , busy people , but
13t. Valentino has managed to retaIn his
hold ) on theIr hearts Valentines are ns popular -
ular aji cyrr , and dealers and manufacturers
declare that the makIng of valentines has
never been such a recognized Industry as It
Is today Wo arc n9t limited to the old . fash-
toned lace valentine , such as your grand-
mother can show you In Its embossed ye ! .
Jaw envelope although you may buy exactly
such . a one , for the call , . for this style never
seems to grow less
. When one pauses to think for a moment of
.Cho orIgin uf St Valentine's day-that an-
l1ually recurrIng season of sentimental observances -
, servances which have been so fondly cher-
1shell through many centuries by callow
l youths and also by those of maturer years-
the question naturally arises , what manner
of man even was thIs same pious Individual
whom the church thought worthy of canon-
Szatlon ?
Surely he-must have been guilty or occa- ,
elonal lapses from thc cmtemplatlon : ! or things
, celestial , else his name woulll never have :
come to be Identified with the lover' hell-
day ,
As a matter or tact , the character of the
good saInt Is deeply wronged by such 'a distinctly -
tlncl1y secular reflection , nllli Chriolemlom
has plainly acted In n most unwarrantable
and presumptuous manner In devoting the so-
called day ofStr Valentine to the exchange
or love tokens and the blighting or tender
oWQ. _
011 reference to history we smply ! learn
that Vatentlnus bishop or . more properly
presbyter of the third century was cast Into
the l\lamertlno \ prison by thE Emperor Cla d-
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r-- ! ' A TIIEAT R COSTUME I
lUll for too zealous proselyting ( ; that while
110 confined he cured the Jailer's daughter of
blindness , thereby convertng ! both the maiden
and her father to Christianity and that finally
'he ' was haled to death , being first beaten
with clubs , and then beheaded In the Forum.
And yet , notwithstanding this unvarnished
tale , the poets , while always assumIng that
the "feathered songsters of the air" are
mainly : rCl.'ponslble for the annual outbreak of
senfinent ( at the approach of spring , also are
I wont to Imply , with unbounded license , that
poor St. Valentine so evidently approved or
the bIrds' amatory example In his time that
ho actually entered Into some acct of a. sec -
c crot compact with them faa the bmefit of hu-
nanny ever after.
Old John Donne fcr Instance the poet
divine of the seventeenth century thus Ir-
- , Ovently apostrophizes < the saint :
"d . hall Bishop Vnlt'utlnel whose day this Is ;
All the air Is' thy ( lIcc se.
And nil the chirping chorIsters
And ether bIrds lire thy pnrishtonera
Llkewse : graceful Ilia who ought to have
known bottt-r , utters thIs rhapsody :
hail to thy returnIng festival , old Bishop
Valentine ; Great Is thy name In the rubric ,
thou venerable archbishop of Hymenl Im-
mortal go.betw . who and what manner of
parson art thou ? Thou comest nt-
tended. wIth thousands and tens of thousands
of little loves and the aIr Is "nrush'd with
the hiss of rustling wings. " Slngng : cupIds
arc thy choristers and precentors , and Instead .
stead or the crozIer the mystical arrow ! Is
borne before thee.
, Wheatley In his "l11ustratlons to Common
Prayer " published In 1648. coolly observes
that "st. Valentine was so famous for his
love and charity that the custom of choosIng
valentines took Its rse : from them. " Jt Is
needless to mention , perhaps , that the ex-
plnqatlon 'Is quite unsatisfactory. Love and
t charity are not uncommonly attributed to all
reputable saInts durIng their earthly careers
VALENTINE NOV LTIES.
A bran new and appropriate Innovation for
Valentino : day Is to bc the exchange ; or
photographs among frllmlls. As always , the
fashion originated In the minds of n leading [
coterla of socIety girls , and thc leading photographers -
tographers say that already there Is a phenomenally
nOlllenally large placing of orders for handsome -
some IJhotogr\IIhs. : \ These : will be sent out In
place of Valentino cards and will arrIve In
the morning mall or by messenger with a
Valentino } / I1(1I8agoHlllen across one corner
All : autograph on the taco being de rlguer ,
All expensive addition of this photographic
method of oblervlng ( bo day Is the rage for
miniatures. One cannot give an exquisite
miniature or ono's self to any but OM'S near-
eat and dearest , but artists end jewelers say
they have numerous orders for miniatures
to be finished before ! Valentine day They
. are framIng miniatures mntllly either In gold
wreath ! or exquisite workmanship or In ! n
lucceSiloll of small diamonds or pearls. !
The demand for valentine Rifts-which cnn ,
bo gauged accurately only by specIal orders ,
there beIng little way of tracing the use to
whIch ready made goods are pllt-Is not
- large tIle custom of chancing gifts on
that day' not being very general , But such
call as there Is thus far Is largely for small
pieces 6f Jewolry. The Urownlo craze Is
dyIng out , and the next thing on the docket
will ! hd mIniature copies of all the golfing
1mplemellts , Titus tar UIOSO are not In
stock and IIInat bo made to order , ThE !
daintiest Jewelled trifles for valentines ' are
tiny laurel wreaths ( whIch have supplanted
the bow knot so poplllnr for the last two
aOalions ) , alai miles of wings that for the
IleASOn In .qu stron are ascribed to Cupid in-
.tead of Mercury
For the I\Q\V photograpblo valentine a
tram hi 1 > a matter of course Sliver leads
for medium priced frames Ivory Is the
thIng It money Is JlO object , and II very dell.
cato and charming triune Is of cobweb - like
linen embroldercd with true lo\'ers' knots
and cupIds playing pranks with wreaths cf
e flowers done In the nnturlll tints of wash
UQ , The embroidery Is marvelously fine
and the frame , while as delicate liS lace
can bo cleansed without fading as long a
thol)1luturo Inta. i
' AuoIIorYlllentlll.Q , novelty this year will
ti. bo &everlll betrothal announcements ThIs
Is A pretty conceit and If lovers can : conceal
their devotion for a week or two , or a few
days . In order to announce the choosIng of
. their 11\IIfe 'cn ) O\lllld'4 \ day , the day IIIIY COllie
to be looked upon at Icred : to that rite
The most fnahlona\lls \ , of tlllt Fifth venue
caterers has I'll order for" betrothal
luncheon .10 be glovg on VallDUne's day , at
whIch riD Is gains . . iq serge the Ices In thr
form or cullltIs anti iloves. The doilies tor
the Anger ! bowls win bl the fiance's gifts to
\ler guests . It being t\ new lid to make a col-
Jec lou 'ol ' these Uaelc.sa ! and elegant vanities ,
eAch. ono , . dUfetgnt Irons very other one ,
xhtw : are to bll'lclrclea + of silk gaunt bearing
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valentine cupids encircled , If you please , In
Valenciennes lacc. The taco Is the real thIng
and each dolly Is worth the larger part of
a . $10 bill.
The cards bearIng the guest's names will
be pink-tinted rose petals , as natural as nature -
ture , with the names etched . upon them In
gold.
CHEAP VALENTINES. I
A sheet of rough , water-color paper will
prove the most useful foundation upon which
to build. For the first , style , cut two cards
from this sheet , each two and three-tourths
by four Inches In size. Upon each of these ,
near ana end outline a butterfly In different
positions. Those you can trace 'Irom pic-
tures whIch will be easily found , It you are
not acucstomed to drawing : Now with n
small brush color these with water-colors ,
perhaps one yellow the other light brown.
Add a few dots and 'dashes or deeper color
and paint the body brown if you have
soma gliding , add a few dots of that to the
wings , and print with It In odd letters , the
words : "To My Valentine , " across from
ono card to the other. Finish by tying the
two cards together' 'WIth a narrow yellow
ribbon , through h les 'cut with buttonhole
sclssora. The . resultivill'be ' very satisfactory.
If you have not theJpjInta and have a set
of Brownie stamps , - a very runny little valen-
tine may be made JJ1.tho same mnnner as
the one just descrl6 d , by stamping two or
three or the Brownies In place of the butter-
Illes. Each corner of , the cards may be
elided nad the sarno l tterlng used as upon
the other or the letterIng may be done with
lien and Ink. Rod Inlf.'Is ; pretty for this
pu rpose , , .
Another ! card five Inches square , has the
corners glided and a Drownle stamped diagon-
ally on the card near each corner Yhllo
through the center run the words In gilt let-
terIng , "With best wishes to my Yalentlne : '
If the tour corners are occupied by an artist ,
a musician , a policeman and a dude , no mnt-
ter-the recipient cnn count them upon her
buttons after the manner of the "rIch man ,
poor man beggar man , thief " and decide
thereby which her future husband Is to be.
A. . card about four inches square Is cut heart
shape ; the edge Is glided all around with irregular -
regular strokes and the surface wIthin Is
covered with clots of the gilt Then wIth gll:1- :
Ing or different shades , as bronze or blue--
green , or wIth n pretty shade of water colors ,
the words , "Each dot means love for you , "
are traced In fanciful lettering with a mall
brush Two smaller hearts may be cut and
tletf together with ribbon , and ( the edges IIn.
Isll\J like the larger heart , while letterIng ,
stamps or outlines may be added ,
A pattern : which may be familiar Is that or
a . shoe sole A row of email dots near the
edge Indicate the nails , und the words "I
love you from the bottom ol my sole " are
straggled over Its surface ,
A plain card , or one cut In heart shape ,
which cannot fall to delight the recipIent If
she have a spark of fun In her makeup , has
two raisins glued , or better still fastened to
Its surface with a few short stitches , antI the
words added , "J love you for two raisins , "
Another means of decorating the valentines
Is by the use or the embossed pictures which
children paste In scrap books Cards cut
from the water-coler paper may have two
small pictures pasted neatly on , In place of
the butterllles , and then be tied together as
directed. A heart shaped card may also
have a pretty picture , t\ head or a flower In
Its center and the edge finished like the
others described A pretty quotation nicely
written upon one of these rough surface
cards , and a dainty bow of rIbbon tied near
one corner males a very pretty valentine ,
much prettier than could be purchased with
no greater expense , The rough surface of
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this paper given an artistic Amish to the
simplest bit of work If cnreruly done
The lace paper which : comes upon toilet l
soap boxes rlllan boxes and confectlonery-
often large squares are used 10 corer the
caedles : In boxes-may bo IIlade tu play nn
Important part In theyalenllne makIng.
Strips of this lace pap r may be made to
finish the four shies 'Ot II. card , and pictures ,
stamps or gilt lettering be added to the
Inner space ; ar ' two wIde strips may tie
fastened to opposite Ades meeting m , the
middle ; these are to open back and show a
pIcture or letterIng beneath A squard of the
lace paper will servo to , , , make a valentine
quite equal to those In the stores ' ' Ole }
edge : of the card I. turned forward aad'tho ,
edge of the lace IiqulJrQ 11 paned over , thli
and forms on upper leaf l 'A verse'plglure \
of butterf lea may decorate ' the lo'wrrs.loa.f , ' :
and perhaps an ombosatii plcture be hllagttio
the lace front. Datuty.htlored : ; paper Is
even prettier with thelll , than the ! 1t" \ ,
Sl'itIIi $ TY . ,
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Sklrta ! Whler-5leeves. NoL Ulmlnl blld'f f-
folk JukelA with J.vlllberTrJwwln/ '
, NEW YORK . , Feb. \iipeclal'-1'houab ! ) , a
few models kayo ! bunt prematurely front the I
ra
cocoon of fashion styles for spring gowns
are stili In a chrysalis stage.
It will tale just four weeks more , truthful
couturieres admit , to bring the new crop of
butterflies to modish perfection ; but even
then It seems quite safe to assume the.
highest excellence of the comIng season will
'
not yet bo born.
It Is not for the early bird Dame FashIon I
puts forth her best worms , but rather for
her who , waiting until the season Is well on
Its feet profits by all the mistakes her
rushIng sisters have made , and so achIeves
perrectlon.
But , ns our , dear dead Stephenson has
written . "to be overwlse Is to ossify " In
time.
Instead of an admirable waiting , Instinct ,
a quick eye for a good thIng may rather be
desired ; and among all the "Ieft-ov , "
"renovateds" and wIckedly ugly things that
are heralding the coming month , two new
sprIng costumes may bo mentioned ns things
to look upon and not fear.
The first a strictly walking suit of black
English serge Is made with a full flared
skirt , and a short , cutaway coat
The shape of tile skirt differs In no great
degree from the winter model of the front
gores and godet blck. : Instead of the deadly
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SLNrIIOL ONIUdS A'lUVG
- - ,
heavy haircloth , however the Interlining Is :
of the lighter grass cloth , a Iaqulnvlro
braId giving the proper stand - ott effect nt
the teet. The jacket , whose short bottom
fiarcs slightly over the hips and lies at this
back In ! two Inturnlng pleats , Is tight fitting ,
Jt opens over a trim , hlgh.collnred vest .ot
blue and wblte pique and the large sleeves
are glgot-ahapod and held In place at the top
with IIhlrrlng. This slurring by the way
mnrks all the new tailor sleeve tops The
cutaway jacket , too , Is offered as a rival for
the longer cOat , and a younger fancy for thIs
than the one described Is to have the tall
ripple slightly all round
The best tailor sleeves yet seen are . as
heretofore huge mullen . leg affaIrs , cut on
the bias , They are not perceptibly stiffened ,
but are held gracefully _ out by a solid linen
Interlining , arid often good effects are made
by laying the lower InsIde scam In pleats
ThIs brings much of the tullnella from underneath -
derneath and It Is balanced by a cluster
of pleats at the upper Inside seam , the two
causing the sleeve to fall over the arm In
heavy half.rlng aIds. Another becoming
sleeve beIng adopted for now tailor gowns
III mad with a vast upper arm puff and a I
long curt , that fits the forearm IIko a glove , : .
, This puff drops sharply trolll the shoulder ,
this outward bulge that now distinGuishes all
modish sleevescol1lng , ! only It the lower ) part
As to new wrinkles In skirts authorltl
dIffer on the all-Important matter , A gentleman .
man tamed for swagger English gowns vows
that , they lire .to bit more stiffened than ever ,
' , mon < wired In the bargaIn , and that at the
: , baclq ; the great cages o\vlll rlyveU out Irons
' .tho waist with a Ilttll\ hqurpuraeffect . A
, Judy with French leauings.ewears ! solemnly !
dhal . the ngllsh gvnUelllln speaks with a' '
, forlied tongue : c1all11l 1g' tllst though the now '
. skirts will be wider than ever bafore their '
! grace and dash will bEt a. platter only of cut .
She illualratea her sermon with two captlvat-
Inlt models
Pile ol black crepon , whIch material we
'ara Informed ; I. to be more popular than Vl/r. /
lit ! ! \v\h \ ! bias .cnOQthtleal ; over the hips : and
N
half way down to the knee , beginnIng then
to suddenly undulate until about the feet ! , It
falls In 1I0unce-liko fullness : all round
Thl second : , , a walkIng , aaqr ! of brown and
white whip cord , has thQtnoveity : of having
only ! threp seams . TIle clotji , { Is yery wide
one great piece compassing entirely front and
sides. The back Is cut after Jhe , godet principle
clple but Is In only two gores ; they are
caught underneath with j elastics Into tour
graceful folds , and grass-ploth , , Is the Inter-
lining.
This skirt formed part of the second ! costume -
tume already mentioned as 0. good thing that
,
should be recognized on slg t.l Its trimmIng ,
which took the shape of two yellow : leather
bands , was put on In a unique tashlon.
Neither came any furtherthnn : theo limits of
a wldlsh gore the top , flpo" " , beIng shorter
than the lover and each finIshed nt the end
wIth a smart leather buclil < ; . Ths : leather
was repeated Injhe body vq ICh was a French
Imitation of an English Norfolk jacket-and
'vast. Improvement' on th $ stiff , original , of
course .
The Norfolk effects woi r0 nade by slash-
Ing the whip cord to sho\ straight leather
bands sowed on the lining , "and the collar
and belt were also leather . neatly fastened I
with buckles like those on this skirt. Two
short , flared tabs hung like 0. tall tram under
the belt covering only the hIps , thus back
space beIng filled In by the skIrt , which wa
uncommonly full at thIs poInt. Sleeve .
large mutton-legs , with turnover pointed
cuffs of leather.
Together with the little Eton bodices that
have long proved their elonomlcal ( worth , ,
Norfolk jackets or Norfolk effects , are !
quoted ' to flood the later
'as . likely spring
.
market. .
When It comes tD vlsltlnil toilets , or other
very dressup frocks , It 18 , plain to bo seen I
that extreme fu\lnfss \ Is l to be the order of
the new day Distinct contrasts In color ap-
pear too , to bo an established principle
An adorable vIsiting .tollet by Worth , that
master of lone harmonies Is of golden brown
crepon and mOss greefilpodu de sole The
skirt , whIch Is entirely 'of the crellon and
untrimmed , IIJ the full French circular bape.
The bodice begIns wIth round yoke of
golden brown velvet ; a i fr this hangs a
blouse of green peau do sole : , made trIm at
the back , with a light gat1llirh1g and hanging
In a bag front The large ' aleovea are of the
peau do sole with crepotaca s , and nt the
wrIsts , all well as about the round neck of I
the blouse there Is rlch"ewel
. a embroIdery I
In ! dull copper ; belt and coJlar < ' of brown velvet . :
vet on the bias 'NrNA lo'lTCn
011N4 U : j,1'fI )
- It d
Modes or IIralllo ! and Deonrsting ! 1'llIno ,
J\lIntd thclf nndt . ' ekle .
NEW , YORK Feb. lO.-Heccntly J asked
Mlu Lewis a proferslonaf1df'C6rator. how she
was arranging and omamt trqg tables , mah-
tE-ls. and mora than all . t poplanu : , that In-
dlspenlable triangle of furniture so torJnent-
'pg to the artistically Incllo& .1a
"Unleas you place your' piti . with Us back
to the room . the ease Is bops / east' she said.
"Thlo position Is not \ only goad from It doo-
oraUvo standpoint but a perlorlller likes to
bo Iblelded by the instrument'f " Then .h
-
enumerated various graceful ways to cover
the polished bareness of thIs musical Instru-
ment.
To hang a square of tapestry over the back
from n brass rod 9s exceedingly strlldng. U.
; possible , let the painted subject ! relate to
; 'muslo or sentiment , and have It sufficiently
large to cover the surface of the pIano.
If this tapestry Is very fine work , Its sur-
face should be unspoiled by additions. Across
the top of tbe piano lay a scarf of Liberty
silk or another painted panel. The only brlc-
II-brao that combines with this drapery is a
pair of candelabras , the quainter In style the
better.
AlgerIan strIpes , Dagdad tapestry or Per-
sInn prints make good backgrounds , Their
cost Is $1.2G a yard and width fifty Inches.
With this as a foundation many schemes ,
may be carried out. Baa relief head In
plaster can be swung on It without InjurIng
the wood or the plana Medallions of Beethoven -
thoven Mozart or Wagner can be purchased
for $1 each. A long panel of cherubs goes
well , or a line of'Delft ' or Japanese plate3.
A low settee has "a comfortable resting
place underneath this. EIther a box sent upholstered -
holstered In dark , contrasting stuff , or ana
of the $ lGO green wooden settees , sold to ,
artists , would serve A number Df cushIons
placed on the seat against the piano add
to the coziness and grace of the decoration.
I know a Fifth avenue house where the
tea table Is placed against the draped back
of the piano , llie' 'polSlied ' ! old sliver showing
well against the - Persiiri ! 'cl > lors.
Chinese and Turkish shirts , heavily embroidered -
broidered , to 1101 found at large dry goods
shops make 'mosl- orU tlc , drapery. They
are laid over the'tdpt'df"the i Instrument and
fall downward over tho' back , A curtaIn of
dark velvet serving underneath as a background -
ground over ; hq. 'ack. .A few fine eastern
bIts of chink or''ioltey ( . 1f one possesses
thom , servo admirably : as ornaments , but , In
1I0u of . these a bowl or roses and several
small photos framed , In gold or silver Is all
that the age calla , gr- _ , , j " , .
Whatever other" 1Rrar , your room Is made
up In , put something rich and full of color
on the black ' 'plan , etfcepting : , of course , In
an elaborate drawing room , upholstered In .
fairy colors
BEAUTIFYINOrTtIE MANTEL ShfELF
A like sypteni o1 draping la effective for
this mantel wall That Is , for those who do
not possess large mIrror , an artistic wall
or those abomlpaUons-1I mantel cabinet.
Even with a mirror ' a background of rlch-
toned stripes oJ , colonial silks Is more than
pretty This ctrthln Is hung without fulness
from . tlro ceiling molding by hools.
Far down near the mantel place a mIrror
or a long bas relief of . plaster such as Donn-
tello's cherubs , the Parthenon frIeze , or
any one of l1Ie Ilk , whose prIce Is not over $3.
An oval mirror , with narrow black or gilt
frame , sells for $18 or $20 , but the most
effective are those divided _ wIth gilt pilasters
Into three parts These are imitated otter
mIrrors of "ye olden time" by a dett.lln-
gered cabinetmaker at email cost
Do not burden the mantel wall with orna-
menta In pairs , Have Individual articles
distantly placed , and you will be as artistic
as the Japanese , In ) the land of the fan only
one objector value Is brought out at a time
and placed for admiration In a niche , More
would be artistic , sacrilege
If one , does not care for the Persian tones ,
a background can be supplied of figured burlap -
lap ; put on as closely aa . wall pallor It forms
au excellent panel ,
A scarf or brIght hued Liberty silk on the
mantel board Is pretty twIsted In a heroic
lIallor'8 l'l\ot In the center and the ends
curvIng along the board ,
In the matter of ornaments remember
that Royal Worcester and other bowls and
vases of China are no longer In USI A
Bohemian bowl a dozen exquisitely framed
photographs a pair of candelabra are In
good talte. The decorators object to even
ao many things Severe simplicIty should
rule the ehelt they say ; two good bits of
brIc-a-brac , at most , serving the purpose ,
Some housewIves are placIng a divan under
the mantel If the air gels Its heat from
a register this plan serves and this varied ,
cushions heaped to the overhanging scarf
lends color It Is better taste however to
display the tlreplacoJ arranging It In deoura
live tashlon Small plaques ! let In for tilea
make the beat , adornment. If those are too
expensive paint a serles'pf mottoes In old
German or English acrlnf \ on 11 solid back-
ground.
Mrs Thomson , what OVAS aq ! ] , e\e&"lIt \ } dadl ' . ,
Ion avenue home has the ) V.qp.lp.Illatpry of
the house that Jack putt ) , told ontygbtio " ! por-
celain tltee Imitated In blue .1 Uf1r , # . This
could be Imitated by black J $ erll ' 01n , old \
blue paInted backgrougd \ , Sha alsp has some
Of A'CBDp'S fables done In lIke manner. It
18 II novel decoration and one that Is lIur-
prlslllgly effective.
If the architecture of the mantel Is an
abomInation board Qr quainter style can be
found hg Investigation. 1'omen have pIcked
up old colonial affairs , and have , bad them ,
substituted for the ungainly ones.
The hIgher the shelf , the better the style ,
and If It Is upheld by small colonial pillars
the effect . Is pertect. - ,
DISPOSING OF THE TA LE.
To happily arrange a table Is 'n..hlgh art.
This nature of Its decoration depends upon
Its location. The one In library or.sllllng
room can bear n heavy burden A rIch cloth
and this reading : lamp and books ' , should cover
It . But what must one do with this drawing
room article ? ObeyIng the docorators' yap
would never put II cloth on It , but buy It of
such excellent wood that Its unpolished surface - ,
face would be sufficIent ndornment However - ! .
ever If a very fine scarf or square needs
shoving off , the center table Is a good plnqo
to display It. The rule against Worcester
or any pottery holds good here , but a very
.
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BACK OF TIDE PIANO ,
largo lamp Is an ever happy Inspiration The
huge Sallluma vases , with tankards , hold
aloft the most expansive of fancy shades , A !
picture , and always a book and magazine , I
complete the decoration , I
It Is good form to provide books for visitors I
to glance at , uo matter hoW luxurIous the I
room , A magazine and a rose add an air ol
homellkeness to the plainest or this atlllest
apartment.
One more decorative point outside of turnl-
lure that I learned of MIss Lewis , All the
wall are being hung with stuffs Instead of
paper , ThIs statement was substantiated
by the upholsterers ColonIal armour silk
for stately drawing rooms , French figured I
chintz for sleeping apartments and Burlaps
or Agra linen 'ior ' sitting room , parlor dining
room and library It Is quite the vogue to
do so . and not lit all expensive.
ADELE M'ALLJSTER
I"lIalllon Nlltes ,
A new and attractive black material for
spring wear Is shown , It Is called crep .
onette.
Jrlsh dimities In Dresden designs are
among the daintiest of the imported fabrics \
that can be laundered , r
Long.slemmed sprays of Parma violets are
seen on bats or green velyet trimmed with {
sable fur and guipure lace.
Belts to bo worn with round waists are
folded to about two Inches In width , narrower .
rower effects are even mora popular ,
Some of the smartest skating costumes , w
worn this wInter are made of Illaltlod or hot .
velvet , trimmed wIth bands of scalar . Alaska , ?
snble.
'
Narrow stripes are very popular In silks . . .
and velvets , and some of the evening silks " '
are strIped with many colors , such astplnk
blue and mauve.
Violets and purplish red roses are jhe ,
flowers used on midwinter hats. VIolets are
never out or fashion , and just now they . are
particularly favored , ' ' . ' :
Soft silks are to be In favor for sprIng and { !
summer wear , but Just nt present , all this !
heavier ; varieties , such I1S brocades , stiff
satins and glace silks , are most worn. .t '
Thc new India slurs are brocaded In small
patterns , and plaIn silks woven ao thin that
they are almost like gauze are one or the 4
nove1tes' ! whIch can be IIccordeon IJlalted as
.
effectively as chilton.
Purplish red roses have , velvet petals and are i
set In rows at the back and under the arched
brim cf picture hats of reseda green , browner
or black velvet , this other garniture ' being a
full ostrich plumes. !
In bonnets French millinery Is unusually
smut. Vivid colors , gay ribbone : made Into w
aggressive bows and erect loops , gold lace
PersIan galleons , spangles antI Irish diamond
ornaments alike tend to produce an effect the
reverse of somber ,
Very few women who can afford It now
wear any but silk-lined gowns The skirts s
hong so perfectly and are so light In weight ,
and bodices similarly lined fit better , and . are
Infinitely more comfortable than those made r
a
on ordinary foundations. .
Jackets of black satin to be worn durIng
Lint are lavishly trImmed with jet and have '
vests of cream slll , overlaid with jetted In.
sertlon , forming strIpes. They have fur-
edged shoulder capes , with a design of rich
passementerJe above this fur ron ,
The fashionable dress muff , shaped like nil
licur - glass , Irllled on each and , affords very
little protection to the wrists and hands S
The center of this muff Is drawn In tight
and narrow and there Is much more of lass ;
and rIbbon that of fur or velvet . vlslblo In
these small "finger-tip coseys " ej
Jlalll or beaded black tulle ruches IIIno an
effective and very fashionable trimming for
dinner toilets or crepon and or light satin or
moira These ruches have this softening
effect of toothier hands , but \ are much less expensive -
pensive The tulle 19 very thickly plaited or
gathered and very prodigally allllllld , ;
New Yorl has a Trilby. Miss \ Mila Richmond -
mend , who is studying music here with one ,
of the clly'a hlgh.class teachers , Is sold to
resemble In feature , form and voice Du f
Mnurler' famous heroIne , She will sing
soon at a private lJIuslcalo , when a favored
tow will have an opportunIty to judge of her
claIms to this distinction claimed for her
The wHo of the late President Carnet ;
shares her mother.ln-Iaw's distaste for Ilubllo r
till dlous. For many years slip dreaded that
sOlllethlng might happen to her husband , and j
when ho left home on otnclal journeys she a
seemed ! not at ease until his return. Mme.
Carnet Is slightly deaf , nllll for some time
her health has been tlllllng , One result or the
deafness which troubles her Is that she Is
son'ewhat silent and reserved In mixed COlli'
parry . '
" , . .
- -
I ' iakeVf f
OATS .
: i
' , .f n II ' t , )1 ,
. , S gped in Train Loads. , a
H as . . the targ a , st' sale of any Cereal Food in the .
world , The 'reason ' for it is in every spoonful.1 J
Sold only in 2 lb. Packages ;
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