Omaha daily bee. (Omaha [Neb.]) 187?-1922, November 24, 1880, Morning Edition, Image 2

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    E. SOSEWATSB ; EPITOB
= = =
THANKSGIVING 1JAY.
A PEOCLAttillOS.
[ BAthe " resident ' of tlie United States of
J in their iirtory since the
lww " " * imA * a nation h& . * luis
f M O
' '
535 ,
Tor 11 llie lct the thatks of a happy ,
- eole * ilh one voice ascend m de-
"jo 23th of N vembcr neit , the people
i"iet at their respective places of worship
i ] make theaddowledgment of His boun
ties tnd His protecti. n .and to offer to
MJai pravcr foe their Matmnance. In
vitrie whereof I l.vehereuntfl Fet.rny
lan , l and cauwd the seal of tlie TJcitcd
tales to 1 * affixed. - Done at the city of
Washington , this thirty first day of Octo-
far. ta the year of our Lord one thousand
> i"ht hundred and eighty , and of the inde-
Silence of the United States the one
hundred and fifth.
fSeaLJ B. B. HAYES.
13.-the President :
"Wit. 1 ETAiira. Secretary ot State.
Born parties want M&hone's snp-
pcrt in the senate , and ore tinging the
aoclhing lay of "Sweet Bill MaTione. *
BOSTON has unanimously -rfmoni-
natod Mayor Prince. Bosfori knows
how to kjcp a good official when fiho
one.
Tun Irish btehops Kavo informed
the pope tlrtt they will probably have
ta enpport the land Joague. agitation.
Seventy-eight persons are under police
protection in Ireland.
LiEiTESiXT GOVERNOR GRAY , o
Indiana , has taken the oath of office
as the successor of Governor Wlliams
deceased , and will perfornvtho dntie
of governor until relieved by Govern
or elect Porter.
TUB annual report of the comrois
Bioncr of pensions shows that 230,802
penons receive pensions , from the
gorernroentthe aggregate amount paid
being 825,917,000 annually. The
num of S37,04G,185 wa3 paid outlast
year for pensions in arrears. It is es
timated that $50,000,000 , will bo re
quired to piy pensions fv r the current
3 ear.
v
_
JAY GOULD , having purchasd the
World newepipor in New York , is
now arranging ft change in its editor
ial management. Wm. Henry Hurl-
burl doesn't seem to bo exactly the
Linil of timber Jay Gould can handle ,
and it is now said that its present city
editor , Oakey Hall , formerly mayor
of New York during the notorious
Tweed regime , will become its manag
ing editor.
The JttpulKcan tells Hon. Thomas
Majors that now is the tims to enforce
liis demand upon congress for a Beat
in the house of representatives as
additional congressman from Ne
braska , and informs him tnat it be
lieves that his claim would be al
lowed by the bourbons. The Republican
,
lican knows better. It knows that
the republican majority in the next
house will be so slight that eyery ef
fort on the part of the democracy will
be used to reduce it still further. It
knows that even now efforts ere being
made to contest every republican seat
in which there is a shadow of a. chance
of cheating iho incumbent of his
lawful rights. Its appeal to Lourbon
promises is us silly as it is puerile.
Sir. Major's nomination as contingent
connressman was an empty honor , and
if the railroad organs had scon thn
slightest possibility of his obtaining a
Beat in congress he wouldn't have got
the nomination.
tk
"CHECK SENT. "
The Onmha ifeioW knows rnoro
about the manner in which the JMorcy
lie was circulafcd'than if cares to tell. '
It will bo romcinberod th'at during the
two days preceding Iho election the
10c
Herald published several long "spec
ca
ial dispatches" on the subject , affirm
ing the truth of the infamoua forgery
and containing garbled and lying extracts
i10
tracts from the trial of Philp , the
forger. The. true inwardness of this
picco of newspaper enterprise is made
beautifully apparent by the Carson
Appal , which during the week pre
ceding the election received numerous
dispatches from Barnum , who labored
under the impression that the Appeal
was a democratic paper :
Onoof those dispatches accompanied
by the stereotyped plates caino ' .o
I'.and a few days before election. The
dispatch contained several thousand
words prepaid by the committee. To
lUm dispatch the following reply was
rent by the editor of The Appeal :
\V. H. BAKNUM : The letter is recog-
mzdd JIB & forgery out hera , and you had
letter ndmit _ it as such and ha\e done
iiith the business. 33n. APPEAL.
To which came the following re
ply :
KniTOB APPEAL : You arc entirely de-
fOived. It ia absolutely genuine , and will
| w admitted so by every one. "Very in -
imrtant that all cent yon on the subject
hould be used. W. H. BARXUM.
On the 2d came another from New
York :
EDITOR APPEAL : Impossible to admit
it. It is genuine. In addition , a wing of
the cit'zens of New York have wild to-day
it is by a majority of about seventy thou
sand. It has been a minor but effective
usue. * JOHN TBA.CEV ,
. PcrDera. Nat. Com.
Ono of the long dispatches sent to
( utlaence public opinion had the fol-
Itw'mji sucgestive postscript : "Check
* cntcith tJm above , "
"Why , " aaka the Appeal , "should
the democratic national committee
ffer to pay newspapers for tbe publi
cation of the dispatches regarding
tbo Morey letter , if they believed
< hat what \ny sent ever \hdvrirca
was true ? " Why ? indeed. Let Dr.
Miller , and other democratic journals
v ho published the lying letters , and
I'oubileas cashed the checks sent for
' 'seriing the libelous articles , an-
sier the question. Let him explain
i his democratic ass ciatcs what value
' tbe columns of his
places on jour-
1 as a racHium for iho diffusion of
> eoua political lies whose only ob-
t gas to steal the presidency by
THE CliOSE OP NAVIGATION.
The Erie canal , the only great com
petitor of the railroad monopolieBhas
closed for the season , The route by
the great lakes and the canal to the
seaboard is the safety valve to
transportation exactions daring the
saasoti when navigation is opan , and
any excessive rates by the railroads engrain
grain and provisions are rendered im-
> osEible by reason of the free and full
ompetition afforded by these great
rater highways of the continent. Nome
mo appreciates this fact more than
railroad managers. The opening of
the canal in the spring is always fol-
owed aby a reduction of freight
rates and Its close by a corresponding -
responding increase In the tariff
oa grain and provisions. The pro
ducers , shippers and merchants of the
west will hardly be surprised to learn
that in consequence cf the retirement
for the winter ofliis competitor ol
the railroads , freight rates have been
advanced five cents between Chicago
and New York , and the trunk line
managers are chuckling over the addi
tional sums which they will be enabled
ta extract from the pockets of
western farmers and grain shippess.
It is also announced that an addi-
tionol increase in rates may be ex
pected in February.
What an outrageous extorton upon
tha producers of the great west. What
a flagrantabasoof chartered privileges.
Are tha railroads endeavoring to prove
that the only limit to their rapacity
is tha ability of the people to endure
without open insurrection their
schemes of highway robbery. What
language is too strong to condemn
a policy which is robbing the country
to raise the vnluo of watered stocks ,
and to pay forty per cent a year divi-
dendato stock gamblersandunprincipl-
ed speculators , while Iho people are
toiling to earn a scanty subsistence
out of what remains from the plunder-
ings of the soulcss monopolies who
arc crushing the vitality out of our
farming and" industrial interests.
Two remedies present themselves to
tha people. The first is the passage
of laws forbidding , under heavy peu-
alt'es , discrimination and extortion
by corporate monopolies , and placing
such companies and their business un
der legislative supervision. The other
is found in the improvement of the
great water highways of the conti
nent , which will furnish , during a
hrgo part of the year , a competitor
which cannot bo bulldozed into pooling
earnings or bribed into consolidation.
The people demand a speedy relief
from the evils under which they ate
now suffering. No one state or sec
tion is interested in the solution of the
transportation problem. In every
portion of the country the people are'
crying out for a remedy and urging
legislative action , on a ques
tion of the most vital import
ance to their interests. No better ex
ample of the motives which influence
corporations in their management can
be cited than this aunnal fall and rise
in rates , caused by the opening and
closing of the Erie canal. It shows
that the monopolies will yield to no
other influence than that of coinpeti-
tion. It furnishes the key to the
great schemes of consolidation , whoso
son
only purpose is to throttle competition )
and place the country under the feet
of the railroad tyrants.
CONSOLIDATION railroads dooa
not hurl it helps. It is combination
instability of rates and discrimination
that hurt the people. [ Herald ,
What bosh ! Will Doctor Miller
inform his readers of the difference
cere
which exists , BO far a.i shippers are
concerned , between combination and
3dof
consolidation ? Both arc exclusive of
competition. Both enable corpora
tions to raise rates to exorb'tant fig
ures and rob the pockets of producers
and consumers. Both place the pec
plo at the mercy of the railroads and
j make a monopoly out of roads which
2hd
j otherwise might have aclod independ-
d'B
ently. Consolidation of competing
lines is opposed to every interest of
trade , and banefits railroad managers
rsm
and stockholders by giving them
greater and more unbridled power
over the purses of the people. This
Is the reason why consolidations are
the order of the day.
SECRETARY SHERMAN has notified
the holders of the bonds which fall
due on the 3Ist of December , known
as the taxes of 1880 that ho will pay
them when they become due , and that
interest will cease on that day. The
amount of these bonds still ontstand-
10
ing is about § 13,000,000 , some SOO
000 of them having been purchased by
the secretary In open market since
the conclusion of iunding operations
last year.
THE official count of New York
state , declared yesterday by the state
canvassers , gives Garfield 555,544 ,
Hancock 534,511 , Garfioid's majority
over Hancock 21,033 ; Weaver 12,373 ,
Dow 1517 , Gaifield's majority over all
7143.
POLITICAL POINTS ,
The democratic majority in Georgia
on the candidates for representatives
ia congress is 44,617.
Already reports como of 14 seats to
bo contested in the next congress , all
of the southern and southwestern
states.
The senatorial race in Wisconsin is
becoming exciting ? Sawyer seems to
bein the lead , with several dark hors
es in shadowy outline.
The new senate of Now Hampshire
of 24 members , contains not one law
yer. The fact may be regretted be
fore the end of the firat session.
Ex-Doorkeeper Fitzhngh , of Texas ,
may not be a bigger man than Grant ,
but ho isn't as big a fool as Wade
Hampton and other garrulous states
men.
Joseph Miller , of Rochester , N. Y. ,
paid the most foolish election bet of
the season , by promenading Jay street
in the rain , attired in his wife's night
gown.
Governor Porter thinks that out of
eleven candidates for the Indiana sen-
atorship the contest will soon narrow
J to Gresham , Harrison , and
anti-grip-and-kill-Mason ticket , which
he printed himself.
The republican plurality in Penn
sylvania on the vote for repreaenta-
tives in congress is 36,299. Gen.
Garfield's majority in the state was
977 mora than this.
The Hon. 0. C. Conger , who was
elected to the legislature of California
as "a working man , " says that he has
voted for every republican candidate
for president since 1SGO , aud that he
inte'nds to vote for a republican for
United States Senator.
Gov. Davis , of Maine , has issued a
proclamation declaring that 57,015
votes were cast In favor and 35,402
against the amendment of the consti
tution , making only a plurality neces
sary to elect a governor , and that the
amendment has become a part of the
constitution.
Alexander MouUonex-Governor of
Louisiana , is the oldest United States
Senator now living , having served in
that body under the administration
of Gen Jackson. Although an
octoTenarian he retains his facilities ,
mental and physicial in a remarkable
degree , except his visio.i , which Is
somewhat impaired.
The Detroit News remarks that only
fifteen of the members of the hpusa
in the last legislature of Michigan
are re-elscted , and that nearly all of
the femainiug 85 will take their seats
in that body for tbe first time. But
nut of a house of 153 members in
Illinois only 23 have been re-electad ,
and hardly mora than half a dozen
others have had previous experience
in legislation.
Gen. Sherman's Bequest
gt. Lods Republican.
In bis annual report Gen. Sherman
renews and emphasizes his recom
mendation for an increase of the
army to 25,000 men , rank and file.
AD heretofore he gives good and suffi
cient reasons for this increase , and
these reasons have been obtained , not
through the medium of subordinates ,
but by personal examination of the
facts in tbe case. We have never
had a commander-in-chief who has at
tended as vigorously and systemati
cally to his official duties , and particu
larly to that portion of them which
embraces frequent and careful
personal inspection of the widely
scattered parts of the military ma
chine , as the present incumbent.
There is "nononsinse" _ . about Gen ,
Sherman. Whatever he does he noes
with all his mipht , and whatever he
sees ho sees from the stand-point of
olain and hard common sense. As far
sc permitted to do so he manages the
army on strict business principles and
never suggests changes or additions
in any department that basineos prin
ciples do not abundantly justify. If
congress should propose to increase
the army to 100,000 men he would
undoubtedly opnose it as strongly as
ho now rccomixends an increase to
25,000. He urges the latter on the
score of efficiency and economy , and
would object to the former on the
score of needless extravagance.
Wo trust congress will not refuse to
grant the modest request which Gen.
Sherman has made , knowing , as every
member ought to , that a man so thor
oughly sensible and practical would
* sk for nothing nnnecsasary nothing
' that the public service could safely do
without. Our lifla army which it
ia the fashion inotno quarters to rid
icule and doprvC.xla deserves gouer-
ou * treitment. It e s m idle hroad.
While perhaps a trifle top-heavy in
the way of officers , vnry few even of
these era unemployed , m.my of them
are harder worked than they would
be in a European establishment ; and
as for the private and non-commis-
aionod officers , the emallnoss of their
numbers compels no inconsiderable
amount of overwork. In short , the
- army as a whole gives value received
for all it cots. Ei'h'military visitor
from abroad is : - tonished at its
diminutive size wh > u he understands
what it has to do. And well he mav
be , for the size ia ridiculous when
compared with the magnitude of the
task. The truth of ton matter is that
congress , in its army legislation , has
pushed economy into niggardliness ;
, and , as might bo expected , the nig-
gardltncsa cost more in the long Bin
than judicious liberality. The
figures will deruoistrato that the
extra expense of transportation ,
store ) , and what may bo termed
general wear and tear , which the
amallnecs of the army and the de
mands upon it necessitate , swells the
average annual cost beyond what ith
would bo if the military establish
ment were larger. In other hay
we lose money instead of saving it ay
* keeping the army beneath the er
standard.
It is time this foolish policy were
abandoned. We want an army large
enough for its work , and 30,000 would
be none too large. Gen. Sherman
asks for only 25,000 , not because he
ho could not use the additional 5,000 )
advantageously , but because ho knows
the temper of congress and humors it
for the sake of the important Interests :
intrusted to him. The very least the
national legislature can-do is to give
what Is asked , and we hope the giving
will bo as prompt and cheerful as the
circumstances require.
GENEBAIi WILLIAM MAHONE.
THENEW VIEGUaA SENATOR HIS AN
TECEDENTS HI3 rr.CUUAK INFLUENCE
uJS
ENCE WITH THE JfEOKOES AND HI8
FINANCIAL HOBBY.
New York Ilcrtld.
The peculiar position to be occu
pied by the new Virginia senator.Gen-
eral Willura Mahone , naturally at ,
tracts attention to his record , and
tnakea him a person of general inter
est. Theunusual evenness.of the two
great parties in the senate will doubtless -
less give to the Independent Virginian *
the balance of power , especially-en
abling him when Senator Davis acts
with the democrats Ise
to decide absolute
ly between the contestants. Genaral
Mahone is a resident of Petersburg ,
Va. , and during the famous siege was
in command of the defences of that
iil fated _ city. From early life
and he is now about forty-nine
yeara of age he took deen Interest
in-tho politics and general growth of
his state , and at the becinnlng of the
war entered heartily and with charac-
tjrittlc energy upon the duties as-
nigned him. After the surrender le
accepted tbe situation and turned is
attention to the affairs of the state in
which he lived. He
soon found him
self arrayed against tae Bourbon fac
tion and not at all in accord with what
appeared then to be the ascendant
party. As early as 18C9 he used his
influence toward the isa
formation of a
new and progressive party , which" :
should strive to place the credit : h".d h"f
the state on a substantial basis , and
from that time to the present be has
been regarded as one of the soundest ist ,
equarest and beat intentioned among '
the leaders of the Old Dominion from
the morass of Impecuniosity to the
respectable and comfortable plane of
credit and repute. Yesterday Gov.
George C. Gorham , of California one
of the trio that managed affairs for the
republican party in Indiana during the
October campaign was found ii his
room in the Gilsoy house , and , in re iss
sponse to a question concerning his
personal acquaintance with General
Mahone , replied. "Oh , yes , I know
him very well indeed. "
"What is his personal appearance ? "
"He has a handsome head , a very
turnsihe scale at 109 pounds. He is
quick and nervous -in movement and
as bright as a new silver dollar. "
"Outside of politics what ia his oc
cupation ? "
"He is proprietor of The Richmond
VThig and very careful in its conduct.
Ho was a pronounced Tilden man in
1876 and gave him the delegation In
the convention. Ho came within ten
votes of being the candidate for gov
ernor. " , , , ,
it
"Has he any special hold In the
state ? " .
"Yes , several. He can do more
with the negroes than any other man.
He Is regarded as the peculiar friend
of the public schools , and when the
appropriations were expended he made
a hard fight to have the schools kept
open , taking thecronndthat the childy
ren were the preferred creditors of the
state < and must not be neglected. He
did more than anybody olae to see that
a "free ballot" meant a free billot.
In other words he flaw to it that the
amendment to the constitution was
not a dead letter , but was enforced in
letter and in spirit. "
"Still he Is a democrat ? "
"Yes , but there is no fraternization
between him and the Bourbons Ho
was elected as a read juster. Ho gives
no heed to men who talk of repudia
tion. * His desire is to have the state-
he represents placed on a farm finan
cial basis. He is heart and soul op
posed to the Bourbon funders , as
tbey are termed there. He has plans ,
and I believe he was the ability , too ,
to adjust his methods to a desired
end so as to conform to sound busi
ness ideas. He ia not visionary , but
a practical business man. "
"Have you talked much with
him ? "
"Yea ; & great deal. "
"About the organization of the sen
ate ? "
"Not one word. "
"How do you think he will vote ? "
"That depends. Ho is absolutely
non-committal for obvious reasons ,
but I can readily conceive of condi
tions which can make It easy and 1
pleasant for him to-vote with the re
publicans. It will not doformoto speak
to the senator as if I knew how ho
Inteiids to vote , for I know absolutely
nothing. I reason from the situation ,
from his known desire to develop and
build up the state he represents , and
from the general character of the man
and his antecedents. Ho will in any
event be a marked and useful member
of the senate. "
Jay Gould's Great Scheme.
St. Pan ! Pioneer Precl
The report which came from two or
three distinct sources yesterday , that
Jay Gould IS engineering a great
railway scheme , which will consolidate
all the Pacific railways , except the
Northern Pacific , with the Wnbash ,
under control of a single hand , is
emphatically denied at New York.
Ordinarily , this would only be anoth
er feason for crediting it ; railway
presidents are not accustomed to take
the newspapers Into their confidence ,
and the newspapers have learned to
translate an emphatic denial by a
railway man Into an affirmation. If
the atory ia credible in itself , it may
be discussed without reference to the
New York denial. It has , in its main
features , some elements of credibil
ity. In the first place , Jay Gould has
obtained control , in one way or
another , of all the important railways
affected by the rumor. He owns
practically the Union Pacific and
the Wabash. The latter by a process
of absorption has become the master of
the southwestern roada , which makes
a not-work from St. Louis to the gulf.
Gould ia just about creating a new
line , connecting the Wabash system
with the seaboard. A movement ia
now on foot for the Consolidation of
the Central Pacific with the Union
Pacific. The supreme court decision
just made places the Missouri , Kansas
& Texas in the hands of the stock-
huldiera , who are apparently prepared
to turn it over to Jay Gould. This
road will put the Wabaah system in
connection with the Texas Pacific ,
which is aiucoptlblo of absorption.
Here are all the materials for a
Rrand continental tyatem of railways ,
extending from the Atlantic to ;
the Picinc , and from the great
lakes to the Gulf of Mexico. All
that is needed is to crystallize them
Into a unit. It i * natural to infer that
the allcin t 'i n ambition of
Jay Gould nouscM \ t unite them.
Gould has not < lily been immensely
successful in his railway strategy in
the last few years , but he has lo
his strategy enormously productive in
a financial point of view. ' He has
counted his gains by the rise of stocks
by millions , and probably commands
more resources for purposes of rail 1-
road combination and control than
any other person in the country. He [
ia in a position to make the masterly
stroke outlined in the
dispatches yes
terday morning. Everything in hia
history indicates a'probability that he
would make it. , The story has a credi
ble ring to it. It boa probably some
substantial basis of truth.
The credibility cf the story , how
ever , does not extend to all its details ,
nor to the Mexican part of it. The
Soject for a railroad to the city of
exlco will do for politicians to spec
ulate upon , but practical railroad cap-
Italiata are hardly likely to inveat sub
stantial wealth in it at present. b.3o
with the report that Gen. Grant is to
be mode president of the new tea
bination. It ia always safe to expect
the unexpected from Jay Gould. But
really it looks as though the published ;
sensation was an ill-jointed patchwork
of two schemes ; a practical plan for
combining conveniently lying mem
bers of a possible great railroad sys
tem into a solid and consistent
whole , and a tpeculative and stock :
jobbing scheme for building a
, paper railroad upon the foundation ot
a military reputation. The only part
of tbe story it ia necessary to discuss
ia the practical part , and it is some
what premature to erect any specula
tions upon this. One con hardly re
strain his imagination , however , from
picturing the new conditions which
will be Introduced into political , com
mercial and social life by the growth
of so gigantic a monopoly among
American railroads. If even the cred
ible part of the scheme outlined yes
terday is realized , tte most stupendous
deus monopoly will be created that
ever xisted in the world , capable of
controlling the traffic of the t ,
profoundly influencing , b > its
isE
unchecked power , over trans
portation rates , the commerce EDf
a world , end bringing a power
to bear upon state and federal legisla
tion and the courts , never paralleled
idh
in the history of the country. Such :
a combination as ia described will not
rest satisfied without grasping the
lion's share of the traffic in its terri iei
tory. This can never be accom
plished without a scries of devastat it
ing railway wars beside which that In ti
augurated by the Wabash will be ii
child's play , and which will be con
tinued until all the rival roads are re ii.
duced to feeders or dependencies.
After the now combination has set t- i.t
tled with the railroads It will have to
settle with public opinion and the
government. Its existence and growth
to such gigantic dimensions will aronae
and concentrate upon itself all the
jealousy and suspicion which Is so
ready to attack corporate monopolies.
The granger movement will apring
Into new life. The transportation
problem will assume dimensions and
complexity never before imagined ; the
neation will for a time over-
U
the most important , most powerful ,
and perhaps the most feared and hated
person In the country. It does not.
requirea very fertile fancy to see
great and alarming consequences flow
ing from Mr. Gould's ambitious
schemes.
Distribution ofCarp.
New ( York Timss.
Prof. Spencer F. Balrd , United
States ' commissioner , haa just forward
ed ( to Mr. E. G. Blackford , the Hew
York state fish commissioner , some
1,000 young carp for public distribu
tion. The fish , as seen yesterday in
the tank at Fulton market , were
about one aud a half inches long and
in fine order. These carp are four
months old , and have baen raised in
the carp preserves adjacent to the
monument in Washington , under
charge of Mr. Rudolph Hessel , super
intendent of the U. S. carp ponds.
The parent fish were brought over
here some years ago by Mr. Heasel.
These young fish will be
distributed generally throughout
the state of New Ycrk * to
persons possessing suitable waters
for raising carp , applications to
bo made to Mr. E. G. Black-
ford , the limit of fish to etch person
being five pairs. Watdr suitable for
carp are those where the temperatures
are not too low , as those fed from
cold springs. A muddy bottcj is
preferable , and there should be in
spring and summer a good growth of
plants and vegetable matter. Aoove
all , carps should be the only occupants
of a pond , otherwise their ova when
they spawn , and'the young.fish them
selves , would be destroyed by other
fish. The growth of carp in the United
States has been found to bo
most extraordinary indeed , much
greater in a given time than in Eu
rope. A carp of but a fe < r _ inches
long , under favorable corditions , In
the neighborhood of Nev York.hns
been known to h < vo Kroarn within a
year to be 10 inches long and to have
welghod..alraost two pounds. In the
warmer waters of the south the In-
crmse in size in a very limited Umo
has been oven greater. This , Prof.
Baird thinks , can be reidily under-
stood , because the lost pariod of
growth , the time of hibernation , is
not undergone by the fish In warmer
climates. There can be no pos-
sible doubt that , thanks to the
United States fish commission ,
the finest variety of European carp
( Gypnnila carpioia ) now permanently
established among ur fresh water
fish. PeraonS sending for fish who
wish to transfer them must , of course ,
prepare themselves with'the ' requisite
cans. Shipments are made by .the
Now York commissioner through New
York city only , at the absolute cost
of the cartage. Carp are exjeedingly
hardy , and only tha eimplest precau
tions are necessary in transporting
them. A great many applications
have already been made for these
fish.
Mr. J. J. Schubert , Kankakee , HI. ,
writes : My mother haa been a sufferer
with Inflammatory rheumatism for the
laai fifteen years , in which time she
has tried numerous remedies without
lelief. At last her lmbs ; became so
swollen that she could not go about ,
and I gave up all hopoa of her re
covery. As a final resort , I tried St.
Jacobs Oil. The application gave her
relief and the nae of six bottles has
, performed a cure. She can po about
ad well as ovfc
Thousands hire been cured rf dumb ague ,
hUliuua disorders , Jnui.dice , dypopeia and H
dheasfo of the liver , blood and stouuchwhen
all other retnedici have Wled , by UiiBR-Prof.
Guilinetta'a Fn.iiil < Kidney Pid. which i a quick
and permanent euro for tuose disorders. " Ask
your druggist fur the jrreit remedy , and take
no other , aud if ho cioea cot keep it Bond $ l.f 0
Ina loiter to the French Pad Co , and rcceiro
ouo by mall post-pain.
RHEUMATISM ,
Heuralgia , Sciatica , Lumbago ,
Backache , Soreness of the Chest ,
Gout , Quinsy , Sore Throat , Swell
ings and Sprains , Burns and
Scalds , General Bodily
Pains ,
Tooth , Ear and Headache , Frosted
Feet and Ears , and all other
Pains and Aches.
No Preparation on earth eqnali ST. JACOBS OIL
aa a safe , sure , simple and cheap External
Remedy. A trial entails but the compiratiTely
trifling outlay of 50 Cents , and every one sufferIng -
Ing with p 'n ' can hare cheap and piultiTo proof
cf IU claims.
Directions in Eleven lAnguages.
BOLD BTA1LDEUGQIBTS AHDDEALEBS
IN MEDICINE.
A. VOGEKER & CO. ,
U.S.A.
MAKE NO MISTAKE !
MICA AYT.7. GEEASE
Composedlargelyof powdered mica and isinglaiM
Is the best and cheapest lubricator in the world :
It Is tbe best because it does not ( torn , but forma (
a highly polished surface over the axle , doing <
awiy with a large amount of friction. H Is the
cheapest because vou need use but half the
quantity In gro islng your wagon tbatyou would
of any other axle grease made , and then run
your * iton twice as long. It answers eqnally
as well for SHU Gearing , Threshing JMachlnes ,
Buggies , &c. , as for wagons-Send lot Pocket
Cj clopcdl * of Things Wortn Knowing. Mailed
31 MICHIGAN AVENO
* © "Ask Your Dealer For It I
octao-tf
_
PASSENGER ACCOMMODATION LINE
BETWEEN
OMAHAAND FORTOMAHA
Connects With Street Cars
Corner ot SAONDERS and HAMILTON
STREETS. ( End of Red Line aa follows :
LEAVE OXAHA :
630 , " 3:17 and II : I9 a m , 3:03. : 5:37 and 7:29 p. m.
LEAVE FORT OMAHA :
"US a , m. . 8:15 a. m. , and 12:45 p. m.
4:00 : , 6:15 and 8:15 p. m.
'The 3:17 : a. m run , leaving omaha , and the
4:00 p. m. run , leaving Fort Omaha , are usually
lo ded to full capacity with regular passengers.
Tbe 6:17 a. m. rua will be made from the post-
office , corner of Dode and 15th inrehta.
Tickets can be procured from street cardrir *
en , or from driven of hacks.
-
CAB
SHEELY BROS. PACKING CO. ,
PORK AND BEEF PACKERS
Wholesale agd Retail in
FKESnMEATS& PROVISIONS , GAME , POULTRY , FISH , ETC.
CITY AND COUNTY.ORDERS SOLICITED.
OFFICE PITY M A RKET 1415 Douglas St. Packing House ,
OppoaiqgOmaha Stock Yards , TJ. P. B. K.
i waar .TEJ3E 3ao35 > rB : O
McMAHON
_ _ _ ,
Successors to Jas. T7- . Ish , I'
DRUGGISTS AND PERFUMERS.
Dealers in Fine Imported
Extracts , Toilet Waters , Colognes , Soaps , Toilet Powders , &c ,
A full liijo of Surgical Instruments , Pocket Cases , Trnwa aud Supporters. Absolutely Pore
Drugs aud Chemical * used in Dlspenjinj. Prescriptions filled at any hour of the night.
Jas. K. Tsli. Lawrence HIcIHtahon.
A TVT
MORE POPULAR THAN EVER.
The Genuine
SINGER NEW FAMILY SEWING MACHINE.
The popular demand for thel GENUINE SINGER in 1879 exceeded tint of
any previous year during the Quarter of s. Century in which this "Old
Eeliable" Machine has been before the public.
In 1878 we sold 356,422 Machines. In 1879 we sold 431,167
Machines. Excess over any previous year 74,735 Machines.
Our sales last year were at the rate of over
1400 Sewing Machines a Day I
For every business day In the year ,
The "Old Eeliable"
That Every REAL Singer is the Strongest ,
Singer Sewing Machine
the Simplest , the Most
chine has this Trade
j
Mark cast into the Durable Sewing Ma"
Iron Stand and em chine ever yet Oon-
bedded in the Arm of
strnoted ,
the Machine' .
THE SINGER NOFACTURING GO.
Principal Office : 34 Union Square , New York.
1.500 Subordinate Offices , in the United States and Canada , and 3,000 Offices in the Old
World and South America. Eepl6-d&wtf
HOTELS.
THE ORIGINAL.
BRIOOS HOUSE !
Cor. Randolph St. & 6th Ave. ,
OHIOAGO-ILL.
PRICES REDUCED TO
$2.00 AMD $2.50 PER DAY
Located in the business centre , convenient
to plac 9 of amoscmcnt. Elegantly furnished ,
containing all modern improvements , pancnper
elevator , &c J. H. CUMMINOS , Proprietor ,
ocietf
OnnCM iiyildtj
Cor. MARKET ST. & BROADWAY
Council Bluffs. Iowa :
On line o Street Railway , Omnibus I o and from
all trains. RATES Parlor floor , S3.00 per day ;
seoond floor. i2 50 per day ; third floor , $2.00.
The best lurnisbcil and mort commoiiions lionse
In the citv. GEO. T. PUELfS Prop
FRONTIER HOTEL ,
Laramie , Wyoming ,
The miner's resort , good accommodations ,
arge sample room , charges reasonable. Special
attention riven to traveling men.
11-tf U. 0 HILLURD Proprietor.
INTER-OCEAN HOTEL ,
Cheyenne , Wyoming.
First-cl > e , Fine arge Sample Rooms , one
block from depot. Trains stop from 20 mlnutea
to 2 hours for dinner. Free Bus to and from
Dspot. Kates 32.00 , S2.50 and $3.00 , according
to room ; s'ngle meal 75 cents.
A. D. BALCOM , Proprietor.
W BORDEN. Cnief Clerk. mlO-t
UPTON HOUSE ,
Scliuyler , Neb.
Fliat-dass House , ' Good licslj , Good Beds
Airy Rooms , and kind and accommodating
treatment. Twigood sample rooms. Epecia
attention paid to commercial trarelera.
S , MILLER , Prop , ,
a6. Neb.
Schuyler , .
VINEGAR WORKS )
ERNST KREBS , Manager.
Manufacturer of all kinds of
Jtrcs St. Set. Oth avilOth , OMAHA , USB
THE MERCHANT TAILOR ,
laprepared to make Pants , Suits and overcoats
to order. Prices , fit and workmanship guaranteed
to eult.
One Door West of nmlc&shank's.
slOly
EAST INDIA
o
I
I
BITTERS !
ILER & CO. ,
SOLE MANUFACTURERS
Sf AHA. Web.
a week in your own town , lerms and
outfit free. Address H. HallcttHk 0
nlard. M
HAMBURG AMERIC H PACKET CO.'S
Weekly Line oi Steamships
Leaving Hew York Every Thursday at 2 p. m ,
1&3For
England , France and Germany.
For Passage apply to
G. B. RICHARD & CO. ,
Passenger Agent * ,
it UJway. New Tor *
CT _ C.
MERCHANT TAILOR
Capitol Are , , Opp. Masonic Hall ,
OMAHA. - - - - - NEB.
la ' week. iJ2 d y atbcme eaiilraadeuof
Iddrea TroefcCo.PcitlcU.il
BAHKIHC HOUSES.
THE OLDEST ESTABLISHED.
BANKING HOUSE
IN NEBRASKA.
CAlDWELLHAfVHLTONiCO
Bnalneeg transacted e me as that o an Incor
porated Bank.
Accounts fcept In Currency or gold gubject to
light check wlthonl notice.
Certificates of deposit Issued payable fn three ,
six and twelve months , bearing IntorCat , or on
demand without interest.
Advances made to ruatomers on approved Be.
curitlef at market rates ot Interest
Buy and sell gold , bills of exchange Govern-
rfleut , State , County ami City Bonds.
Draw Sight Drafts on Enzland , Ireland , Scot-
tend , and all parts of Europe.
Sell European Faesaire Ticket !
ROLLEOTIOHS PROMPTLY MADE.
augldtl _
U. g. DEPOSITORY.
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
OF OMAHA.
Cor. 13th and Farnbam Streets ,
OLDEST BANKING ESTABLISHMENT
IN OMAHA.
( SUCCESSORS TO KOUNTZE BROS. , )
BSTABUSOTD D ( 1856.
Organized u a National Bank , Angnst 20,1B63.
Capital and Profits Over$300,000
Specially authorized by the Secretary or Treasury
( to receive Subscription to the
U.S.4 PER CENT. FUNDED LOAH.
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS
Hraiun KOONTZI , President.
ACQUSTCS EOUHTZX , Vice President.
H. W. Yum. Ciuhler.
A. J. PorpiKTOH , Attorney.
JOHN A. CR'IQHTOS.
F E. DATIS , Aw't Cuhler.
Toll bank wcehes deposit without reg rd to
amounts.
leant * tlmo crttlflaites bearing Interest.
Draws draft * on San Pranclico and principal
cities of the United gtatca. IJ London. Dublin ,
Edinburgh and the principal dtln o ! tb conti
nent of Europe.
Sells passage tickets tor Emigrant * In the In.
man ne. mayliUl
REAL ESTATE BROKER
Geo. P. Bern is1
REAL ESTATE AGENCY.
16th < b Douglas fib. , Omaha , Neb.
This agency does BTBICTLT a brokings bnaJ-
nesa. Does notspoculate , and therefore any bar *
gains on Its books are Insured to lit patrona , In
itcad ot being gobbled op by the agent
BOGGS & HILL.
REAL ESTATE BROKERS
No 1J08 Farnham Strut
OMAHA - NEBRASKA.
Office North Side opp. Grand Central Hotel.
Nebraska Land Agency.
DAVIS & SNYDER ,
1505 Faniham St , Omaha , Ntbr.
i < X,000 ACRES carefully selected land In Eastern
Hebruka for sale.
Great Bargains In Improred farms , and Omaha
cltyproperty.
0. F. DAVIS. WEBSTER SNTDEB ,
Late land Cora'rU. P. R. R 4p-teb7tf
BTKOft KXKD. LIWIS MO.
Byron Reed & Co. ,
REAL ESTATE AGENCY
IN NEBRASKA.
Keep a complete abstract of title to all Real
Estate In Omaha and Doualaa County. mayltf
JNO. G. JACOBS ,
( formerly of GIshft Jtcobi )
UNDERTAKER
No. 1117 F rnh m 84. , Old Stand of Jicob Ols
OROKES Sr TKLKGRAPU SOLICITS
n9T.1r
UNDERTAKER ,
Oid Fellows' Block.
Prompt attention given ta orders by telegraph.
THE OHLY PIACE WKEHE TOO
can find a good assortment of
BOOTS AND SHOES I
At a LOVER PIQURK than at
anj other shoe hocse In tha dtr ,
P. LANG'S ,
236 FARNHAM ST.
LADIES' & GENTS ,
SHOES MADE TO ORDER
and iatll ctlon gwrwUsd , Frlceflrer/reaKn'
We call the attention of Bayers to Onr Extensive Stock of
CLOTHING
AND GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
r
We carry the Largest and
BEST SELECTED STOCK OF GOODS IN CM A
Which We are Selling al
GUARANTEED PRIGESH
OUR MERCHANT TAILORING
Is in charge of Mr. THOMAS TALLOW , whose well-establisha
reputation has been fairly earned.
We also Keep an Immense Stock of
HATS , CAPS , TRUNKS AND VALISES1
REMEMBER WE ARE THE ONE PRICE STORE :
M. HELLMAN & CO. .
mSleodaw 1301 & 1303 Favnliam Street.
PIANO CANS.
CT. S. "WiaXG-BIT , ,
AC % CHIGKEIING PIANO ,
And Sole Agent Tor
Hallet Davis & Go , , James & Holmstrom , and J. & C.
Fischer's Pianos , also Sole Agent for the Estey ,
Burdett , and the Fort Wayne Organ
Go's , Organs ,
I deal in Pianoa and Organs exclusively. Have had yearar *
experience in the Business , and handle only the Best.
21816th Street , City Hall Building , Omaha , Neb. '
HAL3ET V. PITCH. Tuner.
DOUBLE AND SINGLE AOTlm *
POWE ! HAND PUMPS
Steam Pumps , Engine Trimmings , Mining Machinery ,
BELTIKC HOSE , BRASS AND IRON FITTINGS , PIPE , STEAM PACKING ,
AT WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.
HALLADAY WIND-MILLS , CHURCH AND SCHOOL BELLS
A. L. STRANG. 206 Ffimham Street Omnhn , Nflb
HENRY HQRNBERGER ,
V. BLAH'S ilLWAUKEE BEER !
In Kegs and Bottles ,
Special Figures to the Trade. Families Supplied at Reasonable
Prices. Office. 239 Toneln * Rf ro h. Omahn
GARPETINGS.
Carpetings I Oarpetings I L
J. B. OSTWILER
Old Reliable Carpet House ,
1405 DOUGLAS STLSET , BET. 14TH AND 15TS
OEST-AJBLISIHEID IIST 1868. ) ;
Carpets , Oil-Cloths ,
Matting , Window-Shades ,
V Lace Curtains , Etc ,
MY STOCK IS TH LARCEST IN THE WEST.
I Slake a Specialty of
WINDOW-SHADES AND LAGE CURTAINS
And have a Full Line of
Mats , Rugs , Stair Rods , Carpet-
Lining Stair Pads , , Crumb
CIdthes , Cornices ,
Cornice Poles , Lambreqnins , Cords and Tassels
In fact Everything kept in a First-Olass Carpet House.
Orders from abroad solicited. Satisfaction Guaranteed
< 7all , or Address
John B. Detwiler ,
Old Eeliable Carpet louse , OMAIAi