Omaha daily bee. (Omaha [Neb.]) 187?-1922, October 29, 1880, Morning Edition, Image 2

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    THE DAILY BEE
E. RO5SWATBE ; EDITOR
MATiCKAL REPUBLICAN TICKET.
TOB rRESIDEKT :
_ TAMES A. GAKFIELD ,
of Ohio.
TOR ICE-PEESIDENT ,
CHKSJEK A. AftTHUR ,
, ot New York.
ffiESIUEKTiAL ELFCTORS.
G EORGE TV" . " 'COCLTNST
of Pawnee County.
of Ailfins Cotmty.
HN'liTHimSTON' ,
* * of I J las County.
REPUBLIC STATE TICKET.
For Merc1 erof Consre-3 ,
EDVTAK1) K. VALENTINE.
For member 5rJongressrC6ntnsent ( ( ) ,
TlfbilAS J. MAJORS.
ft'ci ovemor ,
* AWirisTT ? NANCE.
For lieutenant-Governor ,
B .C. CATOCS.
For Secretary of State ,
S. J. A17EXA7\TKIl.
For Auditor ,
JOHN WALLICHS.
Fcr Treasurer ,
.G. M. JIAHTLETT.
For Attorney-General ,
C. J. DILI/WORTH. /
For Commissioner of Public Lands and
A. G. KENDALL.
For Superintendent of Public Instruct on ,
f. JONES.
DISTRICT TICKET.
IT Attorney Third Judicial District.
JT.-.T.- KU15NHAM.
RAKKUM'S forged Chineie letter is
toj prcpriately called Broken China.
As Now York goes so goes the elec
toral college. Aud New York i going
republican by at least 14,000 majority.
JEKJCV deniea that she is out
of the Union , and auka until after
November 2d to prove her assertion.
SAKAH IJEKxnABDT has arrlred in
New York , and with two weeks Ihe
call-"bull will go ringing for Sarah. "
THE JfrjMiWicait tlmil's the sl > te
can't be defeated. The citizens will
nhoir the U. P. organ , Howe this can
1)0 Doauo.
SrvKjf thousand democratic votes
Lave been inado in New York by
naturalization this Ml. That sounds
Ji ilural.
THE forger of the GarDeld-Morey
letter is discovered in tliu person of
one Fhilp. Filth-would have boon
more appropriate. -
Ax esstern'interrlewer ' reporls that
utlra. llancock is opposed to the gene
ral's election. And that's just where
the people arc in sympathy with Mrs.
IJaucock.
GKACE has been nomina-
-wr * f\ -
ted by the tNow York democrats for
Mayor and Tammany and Irving ELll
are Hinging in chorus "Grace 'tis a
charming sound. "
TUB monopolies' definition of a
cotmuuniat iucludca every one in favor
of common docancy on the part of
corporate monopolies.
TUB Jlcpitblican howls in one
cjluinu that the slate is not a Union
Pacific ticket , aud in another warns
its readers ag\inst other nominees as
"enemies of tbo'Union Pacific. " The
Jtcpublican 'proves its-own lies.
MIL GEOKOEV.XOANE ) is a gen-
tltiinan , a lawyer of ability and a man
Mho h.is an opinion of his own which
lie ia not afraid to express. Therefore ,
acccording to the Omaha RepiMican
ho is an avowed enemy of the Union
Pacific
S. K. JACKSON is making frantic ap-
peils to U. T. worklngmcn for their '
support , but they still remember that
ho refused to contribnto to the fund
which was raisedfor the purpose of
protecting U. P. workingmen from
the lowa.courts.
THE offer of mediation made by the
"UntledStntes to the republics of
IVrrjj'TJ.jlivla and Chili has been ac
cepted by theae countries and "plem-
] > itentiarics have boon named by Peru.
Sluuli the representatives of the
three coimtries Lfail to agree the casj
isto bo referred' to the United States
at an arbiter.
MR. C. K. CODTAKT pleads the baby
nc' as his excuse for supporting tl o
bill that exempts the uliopa , drpot and
ilenot grounds of railroads from local
taxation. Ooutant Biys he didn't
know what ho Was voting for when
that bill pgsscd. The tax-payers of
Douglas county may forgive Air. Cou-
i nit for his criminal ignorance , but
they dou't propose'to elect him to a
second'term.
"To a man up a tree , " it looks very
very much as if JMr. Locks and tbe
waera works .managers "were playing
tha Holly gtrne 'on the citizens of
O u ha. They"d 3ayecl all their Turku
until a few days before election. Kc w
they a'r\Thauling { and distributing
pipes , digeingfoundations for reatr-
voira and making' tremendous ahow
of activity. Thnflbliycioirl.wr spring
failed .in puJ a. single onn of their
cappu through , and Mr. L > cko will
chare a similar fatu iu sp.lu of his pipe
Jayors. ; . - , - . . .
THE Herbl'd comaicnds Charles
35urgdorf'j ) iq was nominated for the
l LslatureOQ the democratic ticket
M &erigjitman in the "fight .plce.
hqrojBlHo3 § that M lBnrgdorf ,
ii the rightman. ia-the.place he-fills as
; .1113 boSsrof i&e"Union Pacific , but
ire bog.to differ with the Herald as to
) iis titn esto. : represent this city ai.d
< iunty in the next legislature. The
1 ix payers and citizens of this county
rant no man to represent them in the
legislature who goes therq muzzled
WHY WAIT , ! i1
Everybody admits Ihat DougUa
ciunty must have a new court house ,
within the next1 five jears at the
firthest. Erery osio who has hid
business to transact in the prcsst-t
old eholl , every property owner
whose title to his land rests on district
court decrees cr is recorded in the
omnly clerk's records knows thatde-
1 iyUs dangsroua. The bui'ding is ab
solutely unsafe. Its Wdlls ere crack-
in : * , its foundations are crumblin .
The vaults which contain the
invaluable records of tax payments ,
real estate transfers and district
court decrees are unsafe and hold
barely a half of the county records.
Every land owner , every farmer , and
every tax payer of the city of Onnha
and the county of Douglas is directly
interested intho , speedy erection ol a
new building for county purpose * .
Why should the county wait any
longer before beginning the work ?
Her credit is in the best possible con
dition. Within the last two years ,
without increased taxation , $10,000 of
bonds .have "been taken up by means of
the sinking fund and interest on them
has ceased. In the same time , a now
county jail has been erected and § 17-
000 expended in the purchano of a
court house site without additional
expenee to the city. In other words ,
Douglas county Is to-day 893,000
better off than ehe ww on the
first of January , 1870. The issue of
tha proposed court house bonds would
'necessitate no increase in taxation.
The present levy would amply cover
the nnnual interest charge. But the
now coutt house would in a very few
years pay for itself in the increase of
value in taxable property adjoining it.
This incrcABti in the value of taxable
pr.ipertj' in the city will decrease tax
ation in the country and proportion
ately benefit the farmer * . ,
Onnha will gain , however , themcst
benefit from the carrying of the bonds
proposition. With the building
of the new court house $100,000 will
be spent during the coming year in
our city and distributed among our
mechanics and artisans. The present
court TIOUEO will revert to the city mid
can bo adapted tit little expense to
their requirements. The Pattee
block can then ba vacated aud the
rent now piid bo saved to thu city un
til auch time aa Omaha erects a city
TIIU.BKB'B advice toeverr property
holder , every taxpayerevery mechanic
and laborer is to vote for thenew couri
housa bonds because it it to their in
dividual interest , to the interest'of the
city and county and because by the
erection of a new substantial and safe
building a calamity to our court
and county records may be averted.
AM. the interest in tha campaign
centred around tha contest in New
York , New .lerecy and Connecticut.
Hoth parties claim to ba confident of f
victory. The leaders of both patties
nra straining every "effort to assure a
f.ivorablu result. ' But while confidence
ii fi-lt by both sides'it freely admit
ted that the republicans alone give
reasons for believing Tn the success of
tlioir ticket. Thd democrats acknowl
edge that the tariff agitation has ii -
duccd thoieands of mechanics to join
the republican r&uks , while the only
hope for any increase in the demo
cratic vote is found in the increase of
voters by naturalisation or by the
coming of age of youths of democratic
parents.
Of these states the most important ia
of course Hew York. The majority
which New York ateio gaVe to Mr.
Tilden in 1870 was 32,820 votes. In
that year tlio republicans carried
thirty-seven counties , and came down
'
to New York City with a clear nnjor-
ity of 58,810 votes which was couuto.-
baUnccd by a democratic majority of
84,000 votes , cast in the counties of
New York , Kings and Queens. This
majority of 32,000 the republicans
are confident of oVercoming in the
present election. From a careful
canvats , they assert that the atato out-
I aida of New York and Brooklyn , will
be carried by 89,000 majority , in
consequence of gains made in every
manufacturing town and city in the
s'lts. New York City they concede
to the democracy by 54,000
majjrity and Brooklyn and the rest of
Kings cauuty by 14,000. This reduc
tion in the democratic rote will re
sult , it is claimedfrom thedcfcction of
the worktngmen and the votes of such
merchants as have heretofore stayed
away from the polls. Taking the stal o
together the republican estimate gives
republican majorities of 03,150 acd
democratic majorities of 70,140 , losv-
in" a net republicinm iority of 14,010
votes.
The democratic estimates claim a
net democratic majority of 38.000 ma
jority. They base this claim uiran esti
mated majority in New York and
Brooklyn and Queens county of
83,000 and a gain in other democratic
counties throughout the state of
14,000 votes , thus giving 97,000 in
democratic majorities by counties.
Against this the democrats concede
59,315 republican majority in the
state , leaving a net democratic ma
jority of 33,440. Their estimated
gains it will ba seen are 7000 in New
York City'and 2000 in Brooklyn and
they concede an increase of only 1000
votes to the republicans in the state
outaido the city.
The republican grounds for belief
in their success seem to be based on
a stroug foundation of constant ac
cessions to their party , a complete or
ganization throrghout the state , and a
hearty co-operation of the merchants
and manufacturers in pushing the
work of the campaign. Tha moat san
guine of the republicans claim that
owing to the efforts to prevent illegal
voting m the democratic majority in
New Yotk city will ba cut down to
44,000 , and that the republican ticket
wilircome-down lo the Harlem river
with a clear 93,000 majority. More
conservative politicians place the net
republican majority at 15,000 , and
the lowest possible majority at 7COO.
THE last primaries scya the IfepvVt-
U. P. ? clerk at every poll recording the
names of their opponents and black
listing every voter who dared deposit
his ballot contrary to the wishes of
the giant monopoly ! If the RepuEli
tan thinks it can pull the wool over
the eyes of the citizens rf Omaha by
such cutrageous lying it will tiudileelf
mistiken.
S. K. JACKSON is working on the
sympathies of Irishmen employed in
the shops and making bids , foc their
vote. Mr. Jackson ia one of the very
few U. P. bosses that refused to sign
the petition for the release of Condon ,
an Irish-American citizzn , from unjust
imprisonment in aBrilish dungeon.
K FEBAT , " Zola's latest
novel , is a love story of pronounced
strength end great interest. It is an
effort fully worthy of Emile Zjla's
hi h reputation ; at the same time , it
is more of a novel and less a series of
pictures than the other works t > f the
French rralist. It ta ? a well-con
structed plot , which ia developed in
masterly fathton. This plot is emi
nently original , indeed , its thorough
freedom from the hackneyed elements
of fiction is as much a surprise as the
plot itself , which is managed with such
skill that tha dcnoaomeut cannot ba
divined until it is reached. There
is no page of the story
that will not bo read through )
for so continuous is the train of ab
eorbing interest that the reader will
not consent to lose even a word of the
narrative , "ilagdalen Ferat" is a wo
man with a past a past that hangs
above her and clouds the happiest
days t i her life a past that at length
rises as if from the tomb and utterly
overwhelms her. The character
fketchm ; in the book ia excessively
vivid. The old fanatic , Geuevieve ,
especiallj * , fo a lurid and powerful cre
ation , and Magdalenilliam and
Jacques nns drawn with a master's
touch. In ehorr , "Magdalen Ferat"
has everything to commend it , and
should at once attain great favor with
the American public. The work
of translation has bsen admir
ably done by Mr. John Stirling ,
who reproduces Z jla's style with no-
tablu accuracy and great effect. It is
printed oil fine tinted paper , aud is
complete in one volume , paper cover ,
price ( 75 cents , in- uniform atvle with
"Nana , " "L'Asaommoir , " "Clorin-
da , " "Albino , " "Miette , " and
"Holene , " by Emile Zila , and willbi
found fur sale by all booksellers and
newaa el'ts , and on all railroad train ? ,
or copies * t it will bo sent to r.ny one
lo any place , at once , on remitting the
price in a letter to the publishers , T.
B. PcteiBou & Brothers , Philadel
phia , Pa.
Distributive Co-operation in England
Pioneer Tro-S.
It is now thirty-lour years "since
twentyeight mill operatives In Roch'
dale , Eiiibnd ; , raovad ! to make an
experiment in commercial co-opera
tion. They had b'como disgmtcd
with < li3 villain-Mis quality and out
rageous ptict1 ! of ijte groceries and
supplied by the local shop-
ad V k steps to bfcome
tbelr own puivo ors ; Tii y anbacrib-'d
I togr-t'icf fo-panc- vo k uu'-il they
ha-l huunlud § 23 With this sum
thevbvUghtat wholetv'o ' eomo sscks
of flour , fifty pounds ol t attne.il , a
hundrfd-ffchiht of Migar and a firkin
of butter. They also secured a room
at an annual rent of 10 , aud ar
ranged that one of iholr number should
rltend j salesman , \ te * * h < > u two
tVenii ga in tLe wear. The firit night
when the queer ftore opened the
co-operUors wcrn i ? & witll a dis
orderly crowd of t' iir follow work
men , met to jeer utl uViide them.
For some timu th only Customer
were the tsrcnty-ei.lr who started the
project. The apcct 1 i'lon turned nut
well , and was at on.O u aled. More
flttiir , sugar , oatmivl iid bu'ter were
ordered , and tins tnm iu Urgerqiian
tities > Others njfr piosentcd them
selves Kb members , and others besides
members began to deal at the store.
In 1815 , the seccyid year , the mem
bers had increased to seventy-four ,
the capitil to 181 , the business done
amounted to 710 , and the profits
frero 22. Ev < ry succeeding year
showed an enormous development.
In 1850 the number of members
was COO ; the capital , 2227 ; busi
ness done , 13,279 ; profits , 830.
In 1800 , the figures were respectively
3,450 , 37,710 , 152,063 and 15-
000 , and now the number of members
is nearly 10,000 and the profits over
100,000 per annum. Tluso eloquent
figure * have spread the fame ot tha
Rochdale pioneer * all over the world.
3rom the original wheelbarrow-load
of groceries the business expanded
and took in other branches of trade ;
Grit a linen aud woolen drapery de-
pirtment wai added , then a butcher
shop and slaughter house , then shoemaking -
making and tailoring , followed by
coal cealing , bating and a flouring
mi 1. Now their trained experts buy
sugar , l a , coffee , wheat etc. , in the
countries where these different com
modities are produced aud ship them
homo by the cargo.
Tha splendid success at Rochdale
was quickly imitated , and at the pres-
day co-operativo stores exist in every
town and village in England. They
make all their purchases at whole
sale , anil payng always ready
money , they ara allowed a discount on
all they buy. Co-operative wholesale
stores have also sprung up , from
which the retail stores buy , receiving
tack their quota of profits made at
the wholesale stores. Then , flgain ,
"the co-operatives never sell on credit ,
and thcrefore4they make uo.bad debts ,
and they are able to turn over their
money many times in the course of a
twelvemonth. They are under no ex
penses for advertising , frr'the distri
bution of profits ia f r more efficacious.
They own their own buildings and are
under no expense for rent , ex
cept the interest of the money iu
vested in real o tate , while the ex
pense of management seldom cxcjods
one or two rer cent on the business
done. Whenever any one , member
or not makes a purchase ho receives a
tin ticket denoting the amount cf his
purchase. At the end of fixed pjriods ,
when profits are declared , a deduction
is made sufficient to pay members five
per cent , on their capital investedand
then the rest is divided among the
holders of the tia tickets pro rata ,
non-members receiving slightly less
than members. The purchaser buys
at the lowest currant rates , and ihen
has a portion of the profits returned
to him. Another great advantage is
that the goods purchased are genuine.
It is nobody's interest to adulterate
anything , or to palm off inferior
articles , or to give short weight
or incorrect measure. The whole
atmosphere of co-operation is honest ;
there ia no distrust or decep
tion , and no second prices , no over
reaching on the one side and no sus
picion on the other. In their early
career the English co-operative stores
learned many bitter lessons , especially
the smaller concerns ; chiefly from in-
competency and fraudulent manage
ment. But this
was only a ripple on
the great wave ; the whole system has
been reduced to scientific accuracy ,
and effectual guards have been estab
lished agitnst both incompetency and
fraud.
England has been called ths nation
of shopkeepers , and It is already- evi
dent that the principle of distributive
cooperation has but put a new face on
B large gestjon of * ' , ft jg
forcing thousands of imall tradesmen
into other avocations. Some yearsago
the "legitimate" shopkeepers and
tradesmen united in a frantic
effort to have the co-operative
societies suppressed by act of
parliament , because they were in
terfering with their means of liveli
hood ; but nothing came of it ; except
the fact , which was developed in the
debates which followed , that not only
members of parliament , but dukes
and marquises patronized the cooperative
ative stores , because their goods ware
of a better quality than those furnish
ed by the general trade. Cooperation ,
eliminates from commercial transac
tions the element of hazard. Tailure ,
and bankruptcy are unknown In Us
operations ; and on the other hand the
chance of achieving wealth by lucky
commerciyl ventures or by forestalling
the market no longer exists ; a fair
and certain remuneration , according
to ability , is all that can be predicated
of any of those employed in conducting
the business. It haa made obvious
the fact that less than one-third the
number of salesmen , clerks and ware
housemen usually employed are am
ply sufficient to supply the nceda of
Consumers ; and it has freed the cash-
paying customer from the.necessity of
bearing his share of the immense
losses incurred by tha merchant un
der the credit system. Another nota
ble effect is visible in the increased
comfort and marked improvem nt in
the habits of the English working
classses. Co operation encourages the
practice of saving and investing small
earnings , and provides means for
moral and intellectual improvement
through the system of reading-rooms
and libraries , which have , been estab'
liehed iu connection with the depot o
supplies.
BLACK HILLS NUGGETS.
There are 200,000 cattle grazing in
tha foot hills.
The Caledonia mine vrill be started
up in a few days.
Four railroads are now pushing
their way towards the Hills.
Q entities of bear mat are coming
into the markets of the Hills.
Rookford diatrict has 140 stamps
of which 100 are now running.
Chinatown in Deadwood is said ti
bo a picture of mud and filth.
The question of irrigation ia agila
ting the ranchers of the Belle "Fouche
Lsad Cilv boasts of a freight deliv
ery of 100,000 pounds of freighc i
day.
Forty more stamps will , within
week , bo pounding acay on TerravilL
ore.
Blacka Hills minors , mine and mil
their oc for an average of two dollar ;
a tou.
The Rapid City valley has produce
this season large quantities of cab
bagea.
Farming and grazing interests out
eide the llills are both steadily in
creasing.
Watermelons were sold last week in
Deadwood with the snow six inches
on the ground.
iJrfskoll , the cattle king , trill drive
7,000 head of Texas cattle to the Hills
in the spring.
Hiiichers In the Belle Fourclle an
nounce a fine harvest with an immense
quimity of. corn.
A firm of contractors et Fort
Meade throw tip their hey contract
and forfeited 84000.
There are 20000 ; head of cattle in
the neighborhood of Rapid City
worth § 100,000.
- The expenses of the DeadwoBd
Driving Park's first rices were $ l4- ,
GOO , and their receipt * § 100 more.
Miners in Stidwberry gulch declare
that there ia ore Unough to employ as
many sunups as the Huniestake belt.
Grading will soon bi > btgnn for the
new sixty stamp in BUchtail guluh ,
which is to bo run on Eamerulda ore.
Mw. Richard Sort , of Deadwood ,
ha ? raised 6 ? canary birds for auln
this year , for which she received $5
apiece.
Private driving and riding stock in
the Black Hills has improved armiz-
ingly. The last batch Bold from $250
to $700.
During the summer twenty-five
brick stores , two iron fronts and eight
plate glass fronts hive been erected In
Deadwood.
The scheme of building a narrow
gaU < ; e railroad to connect Deadwood
with the upper camps promises to bo a
success in the near future.
The water produced by the late
snos i welcomed in the upper camps ,
where a scarcity of that article his
kept many ot the mills idle for some
time.
time.New
New and reliable discoveries have
been made all about Custor City and
several ten and twenty stamp mills
have been moved and put to work iu
that section.
There are four mills running day
andnlght within less than six miles of
Rapid that cannot sufficiently supply
the demand , so extensive is building
going on there.
Parties working a claim near the
Portland Mill , at Bald mountain ,
owned in part by Mr. Overman , claim
to hvo found a true and well defined
fissure vein of very rich ore.
The Chinamen working at the
"Played-out" placer claims have been
making money all the summer and
last week sold two nuggets one. for § 15
and the other for $22.
Junction City , the youngest metro
polis of the Southern Hills , now con
tains over one hundred inhabitants ,
and hotues ere going up nearly every
day. They want a pjstoffica and a
daily mail.
The railroad from Bismarck to the
Black Hills is now a certainty. Con
tracts will bo lut immediately. The
expense of building will be about
85,000,000. The road will open up
232 miles of excellent farming lauds.
A good deal of placer mining is br
ing done at Dansburg. The piy dirt
is hauled in wagons to French crock ,
from three-quarters to a inilo and a
quarter to water. It is paying from
§ 2.50 to $7.50 per wagon load.
Deadwood's churches , which are in
dices of the permanent advancement
of a town , are fairly flourishing. The
Congregational church has graded out
and finished a brick basement under
its house of worship , rebuilt in 1879 ,
and commenced a bell tower. The
Episcopal church has bought a lot for
S1GOO , and is receiving proposals for
building. The Methodists talk of
building also , and the Catholics have
rebuilt their church.
One of the oldest merchants of
Akron and the leading druggists of
that section , Mr. E. Steinbacher , in
formed the writer that without ex
ception the sale of Hamburg Drops
was the. most satisfactory of anything
he had ever sold , and that the unpre
cedented demand was due solely to Its
merits. Snch emphatic expressions
need no comment on oar part.
The proprietors of the Akron fur
nace at Buchtel , Ohio , are engaged in
putting up a new blast furnace at an
expense of $0000. When raised to
' GO feet ia height , with other improve-
'mants contemplated , it will , itis
claimed , ba the most complete furnace
in tfie Hocking valley. The remod
elled furnace will be blown in as soon
as pcssible , with its capacity increased
from one-fourth to one-third , -
KEEpJT BEFORE THE PIOPLE ?
And Let Them Ponder Over It ,
. '
V v.
Valentine's Back Pay Steah
Ventilated by the
, * - Records.
. , . .
How He LobbiedaBogus Claim
for 51875 Through'/the
Legislature Under False
Pretenses.
Five years ago this summer E. E.
Valentine who had been removed by
U. S Grant from the West Point land
ffice for crookedness , packed tha re-
ublican convention of the sixth ju-
icial district and secured for himself
iio nomination * of diatrict judge. Val
ntine was a mere ehyater , having no
letter standing at the bar than the
'edoubtable ' quack Mumey had among
ho member * of the medical profession.
When the returns were canvassed by
, ho state officers who constitute the
late board of canvassers , the board
iwarded the certificate of election to
Thomas L. Grifley , the democratic can-
dida'e Valentino procured a bafch
of affidavits to ahow that there had
been gome irregularity in the count.
He tnon secured the services of John
3. Cowin who agreed and stipulated
n advance that he would
prosecute .h'a ' claims before
he courts without charge.
The case was brought to trial before
the supreme court in November 1876 ,
pnd the court rendered the somewhat
extraordinary decision that E. K. Val
entine htd been elected judge of the
sixth judicial diatrict by a majority of
two votes and a half. Valentino soon
hereafter took hia neat on the bench
and draw his p.ly regularly fr.m the
etatti ( rrnsury at the rate of § 2503 a
year during the entire time ho served
as judge. Iu he summer of
Ifl78 , E. K. Valentine was
foists'd on the people of Nebraska
by the political managers of Jay
Gould for their representative in con
gress. Within sixty days after hia
election to ccngrefs Valentino put in
an appearance at Lincoln as a lobbyist
before the Irgislalure , and by bnng-
ing'nll hia pressure to bear upon re
publican members who had axes to
grind , and roping in the democratic
trieiiils cf Gr.fFey , Valentine succeed
ed in pullifg through the following
bill :
AN ACT.
Fotithe f ivliif of I'horaaa ' L. Griffey
and E. K. Valentine.
WHEREAS , Thomas L. Griffey was
by thu stue board of canvassers de
clared judyo of the Sixth judicial dis
trict and they having issued to him a
certificate of election to said office , he
entered upon and discharged the du
ties of said rffice from the Oth day'of
January until the 23rd day of Novem
ber , 1870 , at which time ho was
ousted from nsid ufiico by reason of
a decision of the supreme CoUrt , de
claring E K. Valentine duly elected
to said office , and
WHEREAS , The said E. K. Valentino
tine , by reason" of said decision , is en
titled to the emoluments' aaid of
fice during all of said time , aud the
aaid Grifffj having drawn the salary
of said office for the first (1st ( ) , scctind
(2d ( ) and third (3d ( ) quarters of said
year , and K , K. Valentino having
dratfn Ho part thereof } and ,
WliEnSAfi , Th i said Thomas L.
Griffey having perfornied ( lie duties
of said office from October 1st until
November 23d , 1876 , under eaid cer-
tilidvto of election , without pay ;
tharefoft' ' ,
Be it enacted by ihe Legiitalure C f the
Stale of 2fcbrai7M.
0iCTJON : t. That the stttn of three
hundred and sixty thn d dollars be
and the tame ia "ippr priited out of
the s'iito tji-ncral fund for thu p y-
uicnt of s.'ii I claim to the said Thomas
L G.iffy.
SEP. S ? . That the sum of one
thousand eight hundred and seventy
five doll.ra bj and the same is appro
priated out of the state general fund
tor the payment of said claim to said
E. K. Valentine.
SEO. 3. The auditor of public ac
counts is hereby authorized and dir
ected to draff hta warrants for said
amounts upon the etrtle treasurer ,
payable to said Thomas L. Griffey aud
E. K. Valentine respectively.
Approved February 24th , A. D.
1879.
1879.This
This infamous steal was put through
the legislature by Valentine under
the pretense that he needed the $1875
top y attorney's fees an'd expanses in
curred in securing hia title to a Beaten
the bench ; whereas , aa a matter of
fact , Valentine did not pay a single
dime to his attorney , John 0. Cowin ,
and never even tendered him his ex-
peules for hotel bill and faro to Lin
coln.
coln.Now
Now , what do the tax-payers of Ne-
bra ka think of this salary grabber.
Will they endorse this man Valentine
who his drawn § 1875 from the state
treasury for eervices which were ren
dered by Judge Griffey and for which
Griffey had drawn pay. Can any
honorable man vote for Valentine
after such an txhib't of hia dishonesty.
RHEUMATISM ,
Neuralgia , Sciaiica , Lumbago ,
Backache , Soreness of the Chest ,
Gout , Quinsy , Sore Throat , Swell
ings and Sprains , Burns and
Scalds , General Bodily
Pains ,
Tooth , Ear and Headache , Frosted
Feet and Ears , and all other
Paini and Aches.
No Preparation en earth equals ST. JACOBS OIL
as tafe , sure , simple and cheap External
Remedjr. A trial entails but the comparatively
trifling outlay of 50 CentJ. and e ry one snfler-
Ing with pain can hare cheap and potitire proof
of i claims.
Directions in Eleren Languages.
SOLD BY ALL DEUGQI3TS AND DEALEBS
IS MEDIOIHE.
A. VOGELER & CO. ,
. , IT. 8. A *
CHARLES RIEWE ,
RTAK
Hctalic Cages , Coffins , Caskets , Sbroude , etc.
Farabsm Street , . 10th and 11 ! h , Omiha , l 'eb.
Teligraphic Orders I'rora.jtly Attended To.
npcr day athome. Samples wilt
kCo
SHEELY BROS. PACKING CO.
PORK AUDRFFF
I wHil\ fie EJ EJitLii
Wholesale and Retail in
FRESH 5IEATS& PJIOVISIOXS , A5E , POULTRY , FISH , ETC.
CITY AND COUNTY ORDERS SOLICITED.
. OFFICE CITY MARKET-1415 Douglas St. Packing House ,
Opposite Omaha Stock Yards , TJ. P. B. K.
I
Successors to Jas. K. Ish ,
Dealers in Fine Imported
Extracts. Toilet Waters , Colognes , Soaps , Toilet Powders , &o ,
A full line of Sunrical Irstrumcnta , Pocket Cases , Truss a nud Supporters. Absolutely Pure
rurs and Chemicals u j l in Uispcnjm j. Prescriptions tiled at any Iiour of the night.
Jas. If. fsb. Lawrence 2
MORE POPULAR THAN EVER.
The Genuine
mm NEW FAMILY SEWING MbM
The popular flemancl for the GEVUIKE SIXGER in 1879 ex. . ceded thitof
any previous year during the Quarter of a. Cen ury in which this "Old
1'elisble'1 ilachice has been before the public.
In 1878 we sold 356,422 Machines. In 1879-we sold 431,167
Machines. Excess over any previous year 74,735 Machines.
Our sales last year were at the rate of over
1400 Sewing Machines a Day I
For i fat ) business day In the jear ,
The "Old Sellable"
That Every .BEA.L
is
Singer the Strongest ,
Singtr Sewing Ma
chine his this Trade
Mark -cast into the Durable Sewing Ma *
Iron Stand and em chine ever yet Con-
bedded in the Arm of
straotsd.
the'Machine.
THES !
Principal Office : 34 Union Square , New York.
J.500 Sulordinate Offices , in the United'States ami U.-xnada , and 3,000 Offices inthaOhl
World and South America. EeplC-d&wtf
HOTELS.
THE ORIGINAL.
Cor. Randolph St. & 6th Ave. ,
CHICAGO ILL.
PB1CE8 REDUCED TO
$2.00 AND $2,50 PER DAY
LociUd in tlie ljtknes ! < i ctnt e , convenient
to ploC'g of amusement. Eleuan'Jy ' IMniflied ,
containing all modern improvenunts , pa acner
, &e J. II. CUMMINOS , proprietor.
3
cor. . A BROADWAY
Council Binds , Iowa.
On line o Street Italhny , dinniliui o i nil from
all trains. RATES Parlor flour $3.00 per ilaj ;
wcond floor. 32 M per < Uy ; third floor , Si.OO.
The best furnished anJ TOOT convnodioufl house
lu the city. OEO.T. I'UELPS Prop
OMAHA , NEB.
IRA WILSON - PROPRIETOR.
Tha Metropolitan It centrally located , and
first c'asa ' In every respect , having recently been
entirely renovated. The public wi 1 find It a
comfortable and homelike house. marMf.
UPTON
Scliuylcr , Neb.
Flist-class Ilotiso , Good Meals , Good Beds
Airy Rooms , and kind and accommodating
treatment. Tw i ( food sample rooms. Spccia
attention paid to commercial travelers.
S , MILLEE , Prop. ,
al5-tl Schuyler , Web.
FRONTIER HOTEL ,
Laramie , Wyoming ,
Tha miner's resort , good accommodations ,
areecample room , chanrca reasonable. Special
Attention given * x > traveling men.
11-tf H n HILLIVRD Proprietor.
INTER-OCEAN HOTEL ,
Cheyenne , Wyoming.
First-class , Fine arge Sample Rooms , one
block from depot. Trains stop from SO .nlnutcs
to 2 Ii ours for dinner. Free Bus to and from
Depot , llatrs $2.00 , $2.60 and 33.00 , according
to room ; s'nglo meal 75 cents.
A. U. BALCOit , Proprietor.
ANDTJEW EORDKV. Cnlef Ckrk. mlo-t
THE MERCHANT TAILOR ,
teprepared to make Pants , Suits and overcoats
to order. Prices , fit and workmanjjilp guaranteed
to suit.
One Door West of Cruldssbaflii's.
BlOly
j. C.
MERCHANT TAILOR
Capitol Ave , , Opp. Masonic Hall ,
OMAHA. . NEB.
HARTIGAN & DODGE ,
Sheet Iron Workers
AKD
BOILEE MAKERS
Cor. 12th and C&sa streets.
Please Give Us a Call ,
THE ONLY PLACE WHERE YOl
can rind a good isjortmort of
BOOTS AND SHOES
At a LOWER PIQUllK than at
any other shoe house In tha dtr ,
P. LANG'S ,
236 FARHHAM ST.
LADIES' & GENTS.
SHOES MADE TO ORDER
d a perfect flt nnr-nt td. Filccs vrvreisoi
bl > -Wll-lv
PASSENGER CCOMMpDATION LINE
OMAHA AND FORT OMAHA
Connects IVitli Street 'ars
Comer ol SAUNDER3 and UA11ILTON
STREETS. ( End of Red Line a follows :
LEAVE OMAHA :
830 , 'S:17andil:19a m ,3:03.5:37 snd7:29p.m.
LEAVE FORT OMAHA :
7:15 : a m. , 9:15 a. m. , and 12.15 p. m.
4CO : , 0:15 : and S:15 p. m
The 8:17 a. m run , leaviric omaha , * nd the
4:00 : p. m. ran , leaving Fort Omaha , are uanillj
lo dtd to full capacity with reiUr pi'sen ers.
The 6:17 - ra. rua will I e mute from the pest-
office , corner of Dode and 15th snrchW.
Tickets can be procured from street cardriT-
ert. ' or from driven of bitka.
- - : , asoENia , mgtyORiO STBB CAB
BANKING HOUSES.
THE OLDEST ESTABLISHED.
IN NEBRASKA.
CALDWELLjHAWHLTONfCO
Buelnaea transacted some aa that o an Incor
porated Bank.
Accounts kept In Currency or gold subject to
Bight check nlthout notice.
Certificates of deposit Issued paraMo In three ,
six and twelve months , bearing interest , or on
demand without interest.
Advances mada to customers on approved se
curities at market ratrs of Interest
Buy and sell irold , bills of exchange Govern
ment , State , County ami City Bonds.
Draw Sight Drafts on Kn < Iand , Ireland , Scot
land , and all parts of Europe.
Soil E iropean Passaio Tickets.
ROLIECTIONS PROMPTLY MADE.
augldtf
U. S DEPOSETOEY.
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
OF OMAHA.
Cor. 13th and Furnbaru Street ,
OLDEST BANKING ESTABLISHMENT
IH OMAHA.
( SUCCESSORS TO KOUNTZE BROS. , )
ESTABLISHED IN 1656.
Organized aa a National Bank , August 0,1363.
Capital and Profits Over$300,000
Specially authorized by the Secretary or Treasury
to receive Subscription to the
U.S.4 PER CENT. FUNDED LOAN.
OFFICERS AtSD DIRECTORS
HIKUAN KOTOTZB , President.
nsTi'S KOCNTZK. Vim President.
H. W. YAWS , Cashier.
A. J. POPFLKTON , Attorney.
JouK A. Cn-iauTOS.
F H. DATO , Awi't Cashier.
This bank receives deposit without regard M
amounts.
Igaues time certificates bearing Interest.
Draws drafts on San Francisco and principal
dtica of the United States , also London , Dublin ,
Edinburgh and tha principal cities of the conti
nent of Europe.
Sells paas igo tickets f or Emigrants In the In-
man lie. mayldtf
REAL ESTATE BROKER
Geo. P. Bern is'
REAL ESTATE AGENCY.
16th & Douglas Sts. , Omaha , Neb.
This agency docs STRICTLY a brokerage bcjl-
neas. Doca notspcculatc , and therefore any bar
gains on ila boo Its aie Insured to Ita patrons , In
stead of being eobbltd np by th e a cnt
BOGGS il HILL.
REAL ESTATE BROKERS
No 1408 Farnham Street
OMAHA - NEBRASKA.
Office North Side opp. Grand Central Hotel.
Nebraska Land Agency.
DAVIS & SNYDER ,
1505 Farnham St. Omaha , Ntbr.
100,000 ACRES carefully selected land In Eastern
Nebraska for Kilu.
Great Bargains In improved firms , and Omaha
dty property.
O. F. DAV13. WEBSTER SNYDER ,
Late land Com'rU. P. B. B 4p-ieb7lf
BYRON BSJD. LBTIS E.IID.
Byron Reed & Co. ,
OLDS3T X8TABU8KD
REAL ESTATE AGENCY
IN NEBRASKA.
Keep a complete abstract of title to all Real
Estate In Omaha and Donglas Conntf. mayltf
HAMBURG AMERICAN PACKET CO.'S
Weekly Line of Steamships
Leaving New York Every Thursday at 2 p. m.
For
England , France and Germany.
For Passage apply to
C. B. RICHARD & CO. ,
General Fasacngci Agent * ,
JuneZMy 61 Broadway. Kew Yorfc
SHOW GASES
VAMCTACTCRED BY
O. -WIUljDIE ,
1317 CASS S.T. . , OMAHA. NEB.
g"A good MPortmPnt alwajm on hund-TRi
TWO DOLLAES WILL SECURE
THE WEEKLY BEE
We calTthe attention of Buyers to Our Extensive Stock of
CLOTHING
OTS' FURNISHINGJ >
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.
"We carry the Largest and
BEST SELECTED STOCK OF GOODS IN OMAH
Which "We ara Selling al
! I
OUR MERCHANT TAILORING
Is in charge of Mr. THOMAS TALLON , whose welt-establishe
reputation has been fairly earned.
"We alao Keep an Immense Stock or
HATS , CAPS , TRUNKS ANO VALISES
REMEMBER WE ARE THE ONE PRICE STORE :
M. HELLMAN & CO. ,
mSleodaw 1301 & 1803 Farnliam Street.
ORGANS.
0" . S.
S.GHIGKERIJfG
GHIGKERIJfG PIANO ,
And Sole Agent for
Hallet Davis & Co. , James & Holmstrom , and J. & C
Fischer's Pianos , also Sole Agent for the Estey ,
Burdett , and the Fort Wayne Organ
Go's. Organs ,
I deal in Pianod and Organs exclusively. Have had years *
-v experience in the Business , and handle only the Best.
J8 SH WRIGHT.
218 10th Street , City Hall Building , Omaha , Neb.
HALSEY V. FITCH. Tuner.
GA S" S
Carpet ! ngs I Carpet ! ngs I
J.
Old Reliable Carpet House ,
1405 DOUGLAS STREET , BET. 14TH AND 15TE
18O8. )
Carpets , Oil-Cloths ,
Mattir.g . , Window-Shades ,
Lace Curtains , Etc.
MY STOCK IS THE LARGEST IN THE WEST ,
I fluke a Specialty of
WINDOW-SHADES AND LACE CURTAINS
And have a Pall Line of
Mats , Rugs , Stair Rods , Carpet-
Lining Stair Pads , Crumb
Clothes , Cornices ,
Cornice Poles , Lambrequins , Cords and Tassels '
In fact Everything kept in a First-Class Carpet House.
Orders from abroad solicited. Satisfaction Guaranteed1
Call , or Address
John B. Detwiler ,
Old Beliable Carpet House , OMAHA.
DOUBLE AUD SINGLE AOTINO
POWER AND HAND PUMPS
Steam PmnpB , Engine Trimmings , Mining MaoMnery ,
BELTING H08E , BRASS AND IRON FITTINGS , PIPE , STEAM PACKING ,
AT WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.
HALLADAY WIND-NULLS , CHURCH AND SCHOOL BELLS
A. L STBAJJG , 205 FarnhRra Street Omaha , NeS
HENRY HORNBERGER ,
1015 ,
V. BLATZ'S MILWAUKEE BEER I
In Kegs and Bottles. .
Special Figures to the Trade. Families Supplied a * " >