Omaha daily bee. (Omaha [Neb.]) 187?-1922, July 05, 1880, Morning Edition, Image 2

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    7
THE DAILY BEE.
E. BOSEWATEK. EDITOR
TO CORRESPONDENTS.
Ocx COTKIRT FRKSDS we will aln-sj-s be pleased.
to bear f rtm , on all matters connected wji -
crop * , country politlcn , and on nv ' ' 3ec
be a * brief as possible ;
allcue * be written on one
( Ideal the l eetonl > .
IB * Nw or Werrra , In fall , most In each nd
eTerycBM accompany any commnnRiticn of
bat nature ncever. This Is net Intended for
publication , but fcr our own eatUaetion and
C " i u proof o , teed faith.
- - iv i ' rounoiL.
AjHCoifHUJ ta ol candidates for Office wheth
er nwJo Vy H cr Wends , and nhetbtr as no-
Uces or communications to the Editor , arc
until nominations are made ) eimply personal ,
ind will be charged for aa advertisements.
| -tojcor desire' contributions o ! s > literary or
peetlcal character ; and * 111 not undertake
toprcsene or reserve the same In any case
woaterer. Our. tiiff U eufflcienOy Urje to
mort thn inpply ourllmlted ipace.
All communications chould be aodrencd to
E. RDSEWATEK , Kfltor.
NATIONAL REPUBLICAN TICKET.
roB PMSIDEXT :
JAMES A. GARFIELD ,
of Ohio.
FOB VICErPBESIDENT ,
CHESTER AUTHUR ,
of New York.
A SIBTEU of Bright Eyes has found
her aftiniity in a white man frem the
Emerald Isle , to whom she was mar
ried , at Sioux Oily , a few days ago.
Bright Eyea Is still awaiting for pro-
posa'a from Tibbies. If ho does't
come to time pretty soon , wo look for
I an interesting breach of premiss case.
CITY Journal : St. Joseph
reaches out and takes in all her "aub-
utbs" within a circle of twelve miles
to mnke up a population of 49'OOp.
Let Kansas City do likewise take in
HuleniWyan : < Jotte , Arinslr. > pgReso-
Uale , Wcatport , etc. , and the figures
would astonish tbo cditori of St. Jo-
aeph.
If Omaha could include all tha sub
urbs with a radius of twelve milcsinto
her census returns , tbe figures would
astonish the editors of Kansas Cty. :
SUCH another oulpouring of the
people of this city Thursday evening
to ratify the nomination of Hancock :
and English , has not been witnessed
in its history. [ Herald.
The editor of the Herald is laboring
under a delusion. There hasn't been
H presidential nomination since 1864
that wasn't ratified by a more numer
ous assemblage of people in Omaha.
We remember very distinctly the
demonstration twelve years ago in
hon'T of Seymour and Blair , which
was addressed by nearly the tame dis
tinguished orators that glorified Han
cock and English Thursday night. Olal
al
la those days , with let * than half altl
the population , Omaha turned out tln
fully a great a crowd as were present tlS
at tbe late jamboree. As to this dem S
onstration being the greatest outpour rev
ing of people ever seen in Omaha , it v
! the veriest bosh. George Francis
Train has time and again addressed
t
greater crowds in Omaha , and the
o
demonstration in honor of Grant in
C
1868 was far more imposing The
C
truth ie , the oufporing Thursday night ol
WM a very tame affair , considering olC'
the outlay for bonfires , eky-rockets is
and brats bauds.
incc
cc
ENGLAND has always been ahead of ccw
all the world in her postal service. It
al
haa been the policy of the Britieh gov in
ernment to make the peats ! service ing'
g'
an useful , cheap and convenient medi g'of )
um of communication between all ofwi
wi
clmaes of her people. England has wiOl
Ol
set the example to this conn- Olul
try ln improving almost every to
a
branch of the postal service. She toac
ac
introduced penny postage , the money acm
order system and registration of let- m
ton. She is ahead of America now m
in the nutterof postal telegraphy. canc
And now another important innovation nc
th
tion is about to bo inaugurated in the
th
English postal service. This new departure
tate
parture threatens to have an impor
tant influence on upon the banking towi
wire
eystern and circulating medium of that wiL
L
country.
The British Postmaster General pro ro
poses that money orders may bo sold tliCO
CO
at any Post-Office in any quantity , COH
bound in volume * like banker * ' checkbooks
th
books , and redeemable on presenta
tion at any Post-Office. The orders tlvi ;
vi
will be printed with the words "one viw
shilling , " "two shillings and six w
pence , " "five shillinc , " and BO on in inso
< half crowns till the denomination of soai
pounds is reached. People desirous ai
of reuimltting money will send as
many of these M will make up the sum.
They mayjill up the order with the P' li
(
name of t Post-Office , and iho order
will therefore become payable U
mst
at that office only ; and they mm
may put in the name of a person , and m
st
then only the parson named can get
the money ; or they may leave the [
>
order blank , and thereupon the person
th
receiving it c n pans it to another person
tii
son , thus making It virtually money.
The objections mode to the plan by todi
di
the .British journals are : Danger of
forgery ; that it will increase the temptation ev
of
tation to steal on the part * of clerks ofm
and letter-carriers ; that there is a m
WAnt of elasticity in the system on ac
count of the absence of small fractional
th
al parts of shillings and pounds , so la
much used in Great Britain ; and that laril
ril
it will tend to expand the cir
culating medium of the country.
"But the major number of these
objections inhere to any system for tha
of . Doubtleea
transmission money. IsT
although some British journals aver it IsTdf
would not , because the money Is de- df
p-jaltsd for every order taken out it 811
would increase the volume of circulation
0
tion , f ; r the government would not m ]
lock up. the money it received ; but mnc
ih's would do no harm. On the con nc
trary , it would give a safe stimulus to ncU
of
bucinets and supply that small papf.r
circulation , the absence of which is at
EC
limes severely felt in England. The sii
bank of England issues no notes of a !
lower denomination than $25 , and the
banks of Ireland and Scotland of less
than $5 , .which i one reason why this Sb he
emalf postal ordeRjrjgtem is thera an frc :
n almost absolote'nBcsMity. Tie bank , frcme
en amd broken will , of ooune , ep- ler
pj
of railrp < -
The exorbitant exactions
pools have during the preseafseason
directed a largo r-'i.on.of the gram
export to t * * ake and canal route * .
Tn before in the history of the
country have the shipments of grain
from the interior to tbe east by the
water route borne any comparison
with those of this season. The
fact that the receipts at Buffalo
for the month of June were in
excess of the receipts from the open
ing of navigation to June 30th of last
year is a striking proof of the magni
tude of this year's crain movement by
the water rout" . The Buffalo Cbm-
mtrcial-Adtertiser , of July 1 , furnish
es the fello wing facts and figures :
The total imports of grain for the
months of Juno reached 17,442,000
buaheh to 7,905,000 in Juno 1870and
14,416,000 for last season up to 'July
1. The gain is chiefly in flour ,
wheat and corn. The movement
of the two latter is out of nil
proportion to that of any preceding
spason , etanSing at 16 00,000 bush els
of wheat for the season o June 30th ,
aud 21,480,000 of corn to 8,078,000
of wheat , and 4,177,000 , of corn , for
the corresponding period in 1879.
The total receipts of all kinds of grain ,
including flour as wheat , at th"d port
this season is 40,586,000 bushels.
The largest preceding total for the
same weeks was 25,674,000 bushels in
1878 , ahd the next largest was 20,312-
1 00 in 1874.
The canal trade has also been veiy
largo and the business pioaperoug.
Boatmen have been kept employed the
entire season , and the rates of freight
have been patisfactory nearly all of
the time. The shipments frem
Buflalo to the eat by canal this
season reach 23,014,000 bushels , which
is more than two aud a half times as
much al was shipped last season.
The total 11 1878 , which season makes
the next beat showing was 19,102,000
bushels.
Asa natural result of thia enormous
grain movement the receipts from tolls
have been much larger than for late
j-eaw. The total collections at this
port reach § 242,522 , which is § 137-
D02 in excess of the receipts for the
orrespouding months last season.
Iho collections on v\\ \ the csnals up to
and including the third week in Juno ,
ending the 22d , were as follow ? :
1879. 1880.
Mi week of April. ? 846,271 82
1st week of May 22,059 11
2d week of May . . 32,540 49 3VOO 73
SdweckofMav . 24.V&5 43 38,92439
4th week of May. . 31,271- 44,259 41
lt week of June. . 20,273 95 42,771 31
2d week of June. . . 18.432 1C 43,151 51
3d weak of June. . 26,585 36 50,863 17
Total 8103,369 34 § 325,791 35
The toll receipts since the above
official figures were closed will reach
t least $ ? 60,000 more , which will swell
the revenues for practically two
months of canal navigation to nearly
5400,000. These figures do not look
much as though the canal * had sur
vived their usefulness.
THE first railroad train will enter
Leadville Monday. This is an event
ot vast importance to the people of
Colorado , and in fact to the whole
country. ! Leadville is located on an
deration of over 10,000 feet , and the
Construction of a railway to that point
in itself a feat in railway engineer
ing. The immediate effect of the
joinpletion of the railroad to Leadville
will be the cheapening of freights ,
ibolttion of stege-coachea and freight-
ng caravans that have contributed a
rreat deal to the transient prosperity
f Leadville. The connection by rail
rith the outer world will , however , in
mr opinion , tend 'o decrease the pop-
ilation of that city , and can not fail
decrease the commercial
tctivity that has up till now
nade Leadville a feral point for the
nining business of Colorado. People a
an go to Leadville for less money
iow , but they can also get away from
hero for less , and many will avail
hemsolves of the chance. The ox-
ansion of the railroad from Leadville a
the Gunnison country , will ,
rithin a few mouths ; leave
< advillc as a way station on the a
oad to the great mining camps and
lien she will relapse to the normal tih
condition of a mining town like Black h
3awk and Georgetown. Denver on
I
he other hand , will be the gainer by d
he completion of the roads to Lead-
rillo and Gunnison. Her merchants
Till more than over supply the min- t
ng camps and draw from them the
lolid savings of the successful miners
ind speculators.
THE choice of Hon. J. L. Webster as
president ' of the Douglas county Gar-
ield and Arthur campaign club , by the
inanimous ! vote of tbo club , was a T
nerited compliment to one of the I
nest gifted , stilwart repulicans in this
itate. Mr. Webster is eminently
ualtficd for this honorable aud res
onsible position. As president of
ho Nebraska constitutional conven-
ion ho was acknowledged on all hands n
be one of the most impartial and i
lignified presiding officers that has a
iver filled a chair. The republicans
Douglas county could not have
nade a tatter choice.
WHAT do these eminent Nebr skans
hat endorsed Tibbies think of his
atest performances in the Indian ter-
itory I
MUSICAL AND DRAMATIC.
Tcressa Singer is taking her rest at
ico.
From thirty to fifty concerts are flt t ]
laily given in London during the
ummer season. v
The Emma Abbott Grand English
pcra Company will make a ten
nonths' tour next season.
Mr. Frederic Paulding it still an-
tounced to appear nightly at the or
Jnion Square theatre in "The Love
His Life. "
Sialfield proposes to introduce a w
cries of popular concerts in Chicago
imilar to these which ha managed in f
evr York last year/
It is rumored that Mile. Alioa
tegnaulf Is going to leave Paris , after
success in the Andrea of Sardou.
ba has received very brilliant offers ci
om St. Petersburg.-- " . " " ciai
Herr Jcscffy "will spend the Sum- aiw aiA
at Bridgeport , Con. , and trill - e w
re for performance next season an d ;
" - * -
. . -
x&saslve programme of compositions ,
in-none of which ho has ever before
been heard'-by the public.
Franz Rummel , the pianist , sailed
on the steamer Main , Saturday. * He
will return to this country apout Sep
tember , to fill several important en
gagements , and will give concerts in
the principal cities during the coming
season.
Mr. Harold Warren , the youog
actor who appeared some time ago at
the San Francisco Opera-house , has
been Offered an engagement for next
season by Miss Fanny Davenport. In
case he accepts the offer he will act
with her at the Fifth-Avenue in Sep
tember.
Mr. Frank Mayo , who is now in
England , will return to thia country
late in the summer , when he will or
ganize a new company and appear in
conjunction with it at Cincinnati on
September 13. He lias obtained a
fresh play , which he will then intro
duce to the public.
Miss Clara Morris will reappear upon
the starve in "Camilla" and "Alias
Multon" at the Boston Park theater
next September. Somewhat later she
"expc-cts to fill on important engage
ment in New'-York. Mies Morris has
cast out of her repertory Mr. Gnn-
thor's play , "The Soul f an Actress , "
which was produced by bar in San
Francisco a few months ago.
The company which is ti * uppT :
Mile. Bcrnhardt in this country is now
being made up in Paris. Ouu of its
members will ba Mile. Jenn3 : I > . r -
hardt , sister of Mile. SuThe lit
ter's new engagement h provoked
the well-known and diatirgoif bed dra
matic critic of The Tempi t ) refer to
our unfortunate coutur/.ven as "gross
hordes of ignorant Yankees. " before
whom , of. course , Ml'o B'rnhardt
should disdain to anp aThis piece
cf gratuitous irrut rtinciice comes with
bad giaco from a writer who cm fairly
lay claim to culuire ; thuirjh Parisian
culture is often nHkd ( o ttie most ab
surd ignorance as , for example , in
the case under view.
POBTBY OF THE TIMES.
Kias tbo Book
"Do 3 on , " sail' ' Fanny , t'other day ,
"In tamest line me as you say ;
Oraro thso tender words applied
Alike to fifty girls besi lei' '
"Dea- , cruel girl , " crie3 I , "forbear ,
For by those eyes , those lips , I swear "
She stopped 1119 a. * * the oath I took ,
And cried , "You've sworn now kiss the
bookr
Summer in cbe Mountains.
Silently steals tbe twilight
O'er the mountain gleu ;
Heady tbe miner is getting
To nquozo his Hanner Jane.
Soon will the " "
muscular "drill thumper"
His arm around her slide ,
Wliile 'neath his graveyard collar
Her pate will gently slide.
Savagely bites the mosquito ,
Merrily the bumblebee bums ,
But all that the maiden sayeth ,
Is once in a while , yum-in , yutn-yum.
The World Moves On.
The farmer in the paper
Read tbe editorial mention ,
That the fate of nations rested
On the C. and C. conventions.
But the trees had leaved and blopomed ,
And tbe grabs continued growing ;
All th& sprouts of corn were ctartiug ,
And tbe fanner went on hoeing. -
When the matter was decided ,
And they made the nomination ,
One declared it was a blessing ,
And another ruination.
Still the fruit grew ripe and mellow ,
And the wheat % vna ni ly growing ;
While the farmer in his garden
'Bout his turnips went on hoeing.
HONEY FOB THE LADIES.
Round pelerines are revived.
Leghorn hats are in hiijh favor.
Rice-court toilets are the rage.
Lisle thread glovei are more worn
than ever.
Mauve and red are a fashionable
combination.
Gold laoe and gold cord hold their
place in favor.
Surtout effects ara given even to
muslin toilets.
Handkerchief costumes will be worn
in the country.
One strap over the instep on slip
pers is moro fashionable than two or
more.
Corah silk , printed with cashmere
designs , makes pretty summer tea
gowns.
Binghampton , New York , haa a
lady barber who can outtalk a book
"
agent. .
Were it but fashionable , the ladies
would' take off their hair for the hot
season.
New York women learn to fence to
acquire quickness , steadiness and
firmness.
Drossy parasols are most elaborately
adorned with beads , lace embroidery
and artificial flowers.
Since the introduction of falsa
teeth the ratio of good-looking women
has increased 60 per cent.
Park blue flannel remains the popu
lar : material for seaside suits tor chil
dren , young girls and older wo-non.
Soft Bash belts with taueled ends ,
and carelessly tied either in front , at
the : aide , or the back , nro popular.
The Philadelphia Chronicle learns
that western girli pn duce bHsxering
blushes by a platter of Sp misb flies.
Nothing will cure a young man's
infatuation for a-tresaea sailer than
marriage aud a chance to pay her lit
tle bills.
An Illinois man found his ruaaway
wife working , in male a't're ' , in a
Peoria tailor shop , where her sex was
unsuspected.
White underskirts ara made very
short , gored and trimmed aiound the
bottom with three rows of fluting ,
edged with embroidery or lace.
The women of Denver will have no
t
more fooling. They have sot thern-
solves to lynching eloping husbands
and duck eloping wives in frog ponds.
Black skirts are muh worn with
jacket waists , as well as a great varie
ty pf silk and woolen draped skirts in
fancy designs. Satin is also used for
this purpose.
The mother of the moat children in
Now York City was found by enumer
ator Matthews residing in district 301 ,
in the vicinity of Hudson and Lewis
streets , in the Eleventh ward. She
has twsnty-two children. The enum
erator earned forty-four cents in tak
ing their names. a
Handsome hand-bags are of black
exquisitely hand-painted in
floral designs. When made to order
they have the owner's monogram as
part of the design.
For once a woman's word haa been
accepted as law. The Utah census
enumerators were ordered to record
0
the replies of all Mormon women as
the truth , whether they were married
not ,
There is a positive passion for ging wic
icr
hams , and ladies and children alike r :
wear them. The fine Scotch-ging-
hams with everlasting colors are pref <
erred by the wealthy and proud , at
Poorer people buy the American o <
makes , at fifteen , eighteen and even
twelve and a half cents a yard.
A stout lady can wear a belt if it bo T
rat wide and fitted , but a narrow , it
straight bslt unbecoming to her. b
. curved piece of canva * or firm bj
trigac , overlaid by three Has strip * of al ]
Jreas goods , will produce a stylish ef. " p ]
feet upon either stoat or thin ladies ;
A slender lady may not need to have
her belt fitted , especially if it be only
moderately broad.
A fair aud buxom widow , who had
buried three husbands , recently went
with a gentleman , who , in his young
er days , had paid her marked atten
tion , to inspect the graves of her dear
departed. After contemplating them
in mournful silence , she murmured to
her companion : "Ah , James , you
might have been in that row now if
you had only had a little more cour
age. "
Scotch gingham suits are trimmed
with fine torchon and are made very
plainly. A pretty model has a six-
inch flounce around the foot , with
three laca- trimmed flounces above it
on the frrnt breadths. The ovewkirt
is in curtain shape , shirred on the
sides by means .of drawing strings , and
u lace trimmed also. The bodice is a
half-tight coat basque , with long tails
at tha back.
The fashions for girls who elope just
now "are very plain. Some white
drapery , a convenient window , a long
ladder , a dark night , a coach , a minis
ter and the house of a friend , and the
elopement is over. If jthe irate falh-
er , armed with a double-barrelled coal
hovel and a town constable , does not
pursue , tha affair is , although a pic
rirei-q-ie , not e'lactly * a successful
tl ptuient. If the father of , the bride
relents within two days the foolish
roti' > l > * are not happy. If it leaks out
th-t iho mother of the bride is in ilia
co reh much of the pleasure of the
trip is spoiled. If both the father and
the mother of the bride arc in .tho
socrat of her going away and have
actually left the ladder near tne win
dow , and that fact is found out , lha
elopement is a failure. In the olden
time the eloping bride packed all her
portable good * on herself and went
away heavily laden. Now , as she is
about 10 return in a day or two in her
lady friend's dress , she gees away
quito light
CONNUBIAL SIPS.
L t a is to be married , it is said ,
and has gone into training for the
cfromo.y. She thinks that with a
few mos.t'ia' ' practice she can learn to
walk fem the vestibule to the chance
withcut kicking more than five times
[ Philadelphia News.
At icjent English weddings the
bridesma'da ' have each appeared in a
different bloom , placed around the
throat ai a dog collar , as bodice ant
b-U bouquets , as wide panniers dowi
the side of the skirt , and as a lan ; <
buuch on the train , and a very prett ;
bridal jrocaasion has been thereby
produced.
As the happy couple were leaving
the church , the husband said to the
partner of his wedded life : "Marriage
must seem a dreadful thing to you
Why , you were all of a tremble , am
one could hardly hear you say * . '
will. ' " "I will have mnre courage am
say it louder next time , " said the
blushing bride.
There will soon have to be a
ding reform , company in London , as
there has lone bean a funeral reform
association. The attendant expense ;
increase with every season , and if they
continue in the same ratio , only the
-favored few will aftflt a while be able
to afford to cjet mannd.
A clerpymsn 'in Pittsburg lately
married a lady with whom he raceivec
the substantial dowry of $10,000 anc
a fair prospect for more. Soon after
ward , while occupying the pulpit , he
gave out a hymn , read the first four
stanzas , and was reading the fifth ,
Forever let my grateful heart
ILB boundless grace adore
when he hesitated , aud oxclaimec
"Ahem ! The choir will omit the
fifth verse , " and sat down. The con
gregation , attracted by his apparenl
confusion , read the remaining lines
Which gives ten thousand blessings now ,
And bids me hope for more.
The town of DeSoto , Iowa , was
thrown into a fever of excitement a
few days since by the knowledge that
a white girl named Miss Myra Dillon ,
respectableintelligent and prepossess
ing , had married Elfz * Hutohineon ,
the negro barber of that place. Mr.
Hulchineon procured his license at
Winteraet , and took the young lady
to a country justice in Madison coun
ty , where they were quietly married ,
and no one about DeSoto knew of the
fact until several days afterwards.
Mhs Dillon's family aud relatives feel
badly about the matter. Mr. Hutchinson -
son is a fine looking colored man aud
has a good education , having attended
college at Griunell.
An Emmotaburg romance is thus
epi'omized by the Pilot on the 18th :
"That marriage which was to have jj
taken place last Sunday has been R
postponed indefinitely. The minister t
was on hand to perform the functions , ili
the would-be bride was more than ilt i
well ploused at her prospect of future t
conjugal felicity , her parents and iib
sisters were overjoyed but the iiv
wouldn't be groom , oh , where was hel v
Go s < his parents , to whose pro &
„ roof , even to Wisconsin/ he
has fl id. But his flight has left one
n'.thivacant. . The trouaseau has
Lsid aride ; the jasmine and the
ii liy are now only mementoes of an
amaranthine faith that
even fate can
not alter But bowie-knives , toma
hawks , bullets , blood and scalps are
talked of by some members of the
family. ' "
JohnH. Shoenbsrgor , of Pittsburgh
was married on Tuesday evening co
Miss Alice E. Taylor , of New York ,
at the residence of the bride's mother.
Hia gift to the bride was a check for
81,000,000. Mr. Shoanberger is one
of the richest men in Pennsylvania ,
and is sometimes called the iron kinp.
The bride is juit entering into middle
age. Sh iftthodaughter of Mrs. L.
M. and Alexander Taylorof Cardenas ,
CuVa , wnose fortunes wera damaged
by the insurrection. In her younger
dajsshewas a leading belle , and in
speaking of her appearance nowadays
the wrrd grand usually takes the
place of the woid beautiful. Care was I
taken to keep the wedding a secret un
til the very last moment , > .nd the wed
ding notices were not printed in the I
New York newspapers until this
morning after the pair were well on
their way to Europe. Mr. and Mrs.
Shoenberger sailed for Europe in the
Scythia , to be gone for a year , and op
their return they will live in New
York.
{ ]
There was a newly married pair In c
Sioux city Thursday that WM a little ti
out of the common run of happy f <
couples. The groom was Pat Farley , t ]
gentleman from the Emerald Isle.
The blushing bride is a daughter of
LeFJecb , head chief of the" Omahas ,
and a full sister of Bright Eyes , the
young Indian girl who has created
such a sensation in the eastern states
during her recent lecturing tour. Mr .
Farley has some white blood in her j
veins , but Pat loves her none the lessy
that account. He says that his
n
people may object to his choice , but { ,
that as he is happy their objections n
will be wasted on him. The bride
n
spoken of as a very intelligent and
rather pretty young lady. She has "
been a teacher in the agency school
for some time. After passing a night
the Hubbard house , the happy
oouple returned to the reservation
vemtsrday. w
Two d af mates wera married on ai
rnesdiy morning * t the chapel of the aiK
Institution for.deinf4nd.durab , Colujn- 11
bui , Ohio. Soon alter 10 o'clock tha 11d <
bifida ad iht groom entered the chap- 111
from i > door on th wait , n ar th 111d (
platform , fcllored by th bridesmaid
r % - ; . - > .
and Rr'oomsrnan. The bride was ar
rayed most tastefully in a coachman's
drab silk , made in princeiie ityle ,
with lace at the tbroat nd oranga
buda in the hair. Professor Fay
stepped in front of the' conple'and
proceeded to repeat the customary
marriage formula , using the sign lan
guage aione. After the usual ques
tions , finft to the man and then to the
lady , had been put and promptly ack
nowledged , he declared them man and
wife , following with a brief and
fatherly address and with pray
er. Not a word was uttered
by month. Although there were
several hundred children in the room ,
a pin could have been heard to fall ,
BO still was it during the ceremony.
The couple , followed by their friends ,
repaired to tbo parlor , where a brief
1 reception was held. The greetings
between the bride and many of her
late pupils was affectionate in the ex
treme. The groom , who was known
to some of the older pupils , kissed the
young ladiea and little girls as fervant-
ly aa did his newly-made wife.
EDUCATIONAL NOTES.
Six young colored men have just
been graduated by Fisk university.
The Indiana State university has
had 340 students in attendance this
year.
year.The
The salariea.of the teachers in the
Indianapolis schools have been in
creased. The salaries are to be pro
portioned to their teaching experience.
Brown university expectsa fresh
man class of at least eighty members.
More than 100 candidates presented
themselves for examination last week.
The annual report of the University
of Colorado has been issued , showing
that the institution is rjpidly growing.
The number of students in the univer
sity is now 89.
St. Louis had in 1879 53 flourishing
kindergartens , with about4000 pupil * ,
130 paid te.iohurs and G5 volunteer
assistants. The entire cost for the
year was a little over $20,000 to $5.70
for each pupils.
A party of seventy students and
former students of Elmira Feu'ale
college has just started for the Lake
Superior copper district. It is the
thirtieth annual scientific and pleas
ure excursion made under the auspices
of the college.
Fifty young woman have just been
admitted to Smith Collega , at North
ampton , M.xss. When the Fall term
opanatho membership will probably
be about 250. Probably a fifth dwell
ing house for students will be built
the coming year.
South Carolina has now in active
operation six colleges of high grade ,
each having a full oorps of competent
instructors. There are alto in the
State six flourishing seminaries for
young women ; three military acade
mies , and a university for colored per
sons It iaexpected that the old South
Carolina college will soon be re-estab
lished. All the colleges , etc. , are well
filled , and the public schools are in
excellent condition.
France has agricultural schools for
girls. One of the chief is near Rouen ,
which is said to have been begun with
a capital of 1 franc by a Sister of
Charity and two little discharged pris
oner girla , and to be now worth
$100,000. This establishment has
300 girls from eight to eighteen. The
farm , entirely cultivated by them , is
over 400 acres in extent. The staff of
teachers consist * of twenty-five sisters.
More than one medal of the French
Agriculturaleociety hasjjeen awarded
to this establishment aj Darnetel , and
the pupils are in great demand all
over Normandy on account of their
skill. They go out as stewards , gar
deners , farm managers , dairy women
and laundresses. Each girl has , on
leaving , an outfit and a small sum of
money , earned in spare hours. If they
want a home they can always return
to Darnetel.
At a teachers' institute held in
Gold. Hill , Nev. , the other day , one
speaker gave voice to some strong
opinions on the modern fashion of
teaching geography. He declared that
the making of detailed maps is a
waste of labor , and that compelling a
pupil to bound every state in the
Union is a piece of barbarism for
which a teacher should be indicted.
He added that the mere memorizing
of facts and figures without the asso
ciation of ideas , is of no benefit to any
one ; and that he thought it better to
have a general knowledge of geographi
cal outlines and an understanding of
the topography of the country than '
to pay so much"attention to worthless
details which load the mind without
improving it. Particular attention ,
> e thought , should ba given to local
geography that of the state and coun
try in which the pupiL lives. He
illustrated tha unintelligent fashion
in which advanced geography is taught
by this little story : A young woman
in the California Normal school whose
betrothed is a fireman on the railroad ,
was asked : ' 'What is a water-shed ? "
She answered : A place where the
engine stops to take in water. "
IMPIETIES.
Mrs. DcGroot , who has built a
church in Newark , New Jowey , at her
own expense , has had a clause put in
the deed 'o ' the effect that if fairs , fes
tivals , or other entertainments be held
therein , the property shall revert to
the original owner. It .is supposed
that the benevolent lady had , at some
time , wrestled with a church stew.
The missionaries report a famine in
red shirts , plug hats , fans and aixteen-
button kids in the heathen country.
The little boy instead of putting "his
Sunday pennies in the plate plants
them under the barn , and they won't
bo ripe until the Fourth. In consequence
quence , the heathen will have to go
short on luxuries until after the up
roar is over.
The Leadville Chronicle publishes
the following as an actual fact : " .But
pass , " said one of our ministers last
Sunday , in dismissing one theme of
hid subject to take up another. "Then
make it spades , " yelled a man In the
gallery , who was dreaming the happy
hours away In an imaginary game of
euchre. It is needless to say that he
went out on the next deal , assisted by
one of the deacons.
A. young man was given a front seat
In a Columbus ( Ohio ) church , on ac
count of alleged .deafness. Soon after ot
the collection had been taken up the
Fellow was seen to transfer the cash , in
the box , which had been left near
trim , to his own pocket. A diminutive -
tivo deacon attempted , to arresft him ,
but ho broke and fled , the pastor and
congregation following. He was
finally run down and the money se
cured.
There's an old Baptist darky in
ETart county , Ky. , known as Tom to
Wood. A Methodist D. D. also lire *
near Tom , and when the two mtet the [
former twits Tom about his , close com
munion. On a recent- occasion they
met , and the doctor thought he'd puti _
old Tom in a tight place ; so he said ,
"Uncle Tom , we may as well Bottle
that communion question now a * at
my other time. As you won't com
mune with us here I want to know
ichat you Baptists are going-to do
ith the Methodist * , Preibyt riani
ind the rest of ni when.we all get to G :
leavenJ" ' Uncle. .Tom scratched JU *
lead a-while"aid1 then , lewldag th *
ibersrtely : "I "till you ' -whifiit I ,
tor , thtyse not gwine Here. " * * *
Hethodlit domlni * nbtided.
I
INJff AJLIDS
* * ' AHD OTHEBS SEpEIKtr
HEALTH ,
STRENGTH and ENERGY ,
WITHOUT THE TJ8E OF DRUGS , ARE-RE
QUESTED TO SEND FOR THE ELECTRIC
REVIEW , AN ILLUSTRATED JOUR
NAL , WHICH IS PUBLISHED
FOR TREE DISTRIBUTION.
. . . . _ _ . , . . . . .
luiin uiAiioa it/s iu * ii * * * * Bwtnjw - * .v
Xervoai. Exhinitlag and Painful Diaeasu. Every
abject thit b r upon health and hnman happiness
rec-elrei attenlljn in Us p g * : < " " * the roanj ques
tion * Mkad by infferiac Inial W , who h e deapiii t
of a cure , arean wer.d , and valuable lufbruution
ii volunteered to all who are In need of medical id-
nce. The unbiect of ElMMie BolU rerivi Medicine ,
and the hundi.d and one , questions of ml itnpoi-
tance to suffering humanity , are dulj ionsidvre < j
and explained.
explained.YOUNG MEN
Acd others who Buffer from K rroni and Fh ic l
Debility. LCM of Manly Vigor , Jreiuatuie Eibann-
tion and the many gloomy coniequencfai of e ily
indlM-elion , tc. , ar eipecially Wnefited by cou.
eulting ill contents. . . .
The ELECTRIC REVIEW exposes the unmitigated
frauds practiced by quacks and medicnl imixwtors
who profess to " practice medicine , " and points out
the only safe , simple , and tfledne rend to Health ,
Vigor , and Bodily Energy.-
&nd jonr addresi on po t l card ( it a copy , anl
Information worth thousand.wll t # sent you.
Addre th publisher. ,
PULVERMACHER GALVANIC CO. ,
COR. EIGHTH and VINE STS CINCINNATI , 0
NOTICE TO BIDDERS
Proposals for Furnishing
' the City of Omaha , Ne
braska , with Water , for
Fire Protection and
PuWie Use.
Sealed proposals In duplicate will re received
by the underlined at ris office In the city of
Omaha , Nebraska , until 12 o'clock , noon , on the
12th day of July , A. D. , 18SO , for ( ammhliu iho
uty oj Omaha , Nebraska , with water works for
fire protection and public ue , for the torn of
twenty five } ears from tbe time of coinpMInu of
ea'd ' workj , through tno hundred aud fifty tire
hjil antB , of the cr.aracter and of tbe locations
meiitlomd in ordinaue No 423 , passed by the
city council of tbo city of Omaha , Nebraska , and
ai'proxrd by the major , on the lllh day of Juno ,
A. f , l&U , Mid the report of J. J ) . Cook , on-
glntcr , niproiej by < ho oily council June 8th.
1830 , copies-of which will be furnished bidJera
on application.
Such proposals or bidu eball be arcompaiiiul
Dy a bond with atl'ost three residence sureties
In the nurn cf twenty-Ore tbouiau dollars con
ditioned in the nent of the acceptance of fuch
proposals or bids and Awarding of the contract
for such public supply and fire protection to such
bidder or bidders ; for the faithful performance
of the teims and conditions of oioinaire No.
423 , and tlat the wjter to be furnhhed througu
said hjJr.ims , shall at oil tiratw when required
during said term ( a reasonable Ume being allow
ed for repairs in cases of unavpid\blo accidents )
perform the tests mentioned in ordinance No.
4"3 , and give tbe fire protection therein mor.-
tloned.
tfald proposals or bldi shall specify tbe pric
perhyJrant per year for the said two bundled
and fifty hjdranU during saU term ; aim the
price per bjdrant perear for iuteimediate
hydrants placed upon the mains spec.fled i the
reprt of J. P. Cook ( on Ma in the office ( f the
city clerk of Omaha , Nebraska , copies of which
Mill be furnished bidders on application ) , in cx-
ceFa of said ttohunlred and fifty , and also the
price per hjdrant iir jcur in case the city at
any time during paid term elec's to hare mora
hpurant ] tpon new mal' s.
Sai 1 proposals er bIJs shall be accompanied by
a conditional acceptance of ordinance No.423 , in
the event the contrail for tbe public supply and
flre protection shall I e awarded.
The contract for auch puolic supply and flre
protection will be awarded to the lowest respon
sible bidder or bidders , and tbe cits counc 1 of
the city of Omaha reserves the right to reject any
and til bids.
Env elopes containing proposes should be m rk-
ed "Proposils for furnish ng the c.ty of Omaha ,
with water for flre protection and public us , "
and address to the undersigned ,
j. F. MCCARTNEY ,
City Clerk of the City of Omiba.
Omaha , Nebraska , Jung 12th , ItSO.
THE OFtLV PLACE WHERE YOU
can find a good assortment of
BOOTS AND SHOES
At a LOWER PIQURK than at
any other shoe honre In the city.
P. LANG'S ,
236 FARNHAM ST.
INDIES' & GENTS ,
SHOES MADE TO ORDER
d a perfect fit guaranteed. Pikco vrvreason
tale decll-lr
BANTA OIiATJS FOUND.
Greatest Discovery of tbe Age.
Wonuciful discoveries In the world have been made
Among other things where Santa Claus stayed ,
Children oft ask U he makes ioods or not ,
If really he lives In a mountain of enow.
Last year an excursion sailed clear to the Pol *
And suddenly dropped Into whatseemedlikeuhole
Where wonder of wonders they found a new land ,
tVhile fairy-like beings appeared on each hand.
There were mountains like ours , with more
beautiful green ,
And far brighter skies than ever wera seen ,
Birds with the hues of a rainbow were found ,
While flowers of exquisite fragrance were grow
Ing around.
Not long were they left to wonder In doubr ,
A being soon anne the/ had beard much about ,
Twas Santa Claus * self and this they all say ,
Holeoked like the picture f csee every day.
He drove up a team that looked very queer ,
'Twas a team f grasshoppers Instead of reindeer ,
lie rode in r. abell instead of a sleigh.
But he took them on bovrd aud drove them
away.
He showed them all over his wonderful realm ,
And factories making goods for women and men.
Furriers were working on bats great and email ,
To Bunco's they said they were sending them all.
Kris Klngle , the Olove Kaker , told them at once ,
All our Gloves we are sending to Bunce ,
Santa showed them suspenders and many thing !
mere.
Saying I alse took these to friend Bunco's store.
Santa Claus then whispered a secret he'd tell ,
Ag In Omaha every one knew Bunce well ,
He therefore should send his goods to bis care.
Knowing his friends will get their full share.
Now remember ye dwellers In Omaha town ,
All who want presents to Bunco's go round ,
For shirts , collars , or gloves great and small ,
Send your sister or aunt one and all.
Bunco , Champion Hatter of the West , Douglas
Street , Omaha
HAMBURG AMERICAN PACKET CO.'S
Weekly Line of Steamships
Leaving New York Every Thursday at 2 p. m.
For
England , France and Germany.
For Passage apply to
C. B. RICHARD & CO. ,
General Pauengei Agents , ,
JunaZMy 61 Broadway , New York
Machine Works ,
J. F. HammondProp. , . & Manager
Theiaort thorough appointed and cotrplete
Machine Shops and Foundry In the state.
Cutinga of every description manufactured.
Engines , Pumps and every claw o machinery
mode to order.
Special attention given to
Well Augurs.Pnlleys , Hangers ,
Shafting , Bridge Irons , Geer
Cutting , etc.
Plans for new Machlnery.Meachanlcal Draught.
Ing , Models , etc. , neatly executed.
SD6 Hamev St. , Bet. 14t and 16tb
.
MW JBiMii iJ.wi i m > m * m
VINEGAR WORKS 1
Janet , Sit. Oth. and 10th SO. , OifABA.
First quality-distilled Wins and Cider Vinegar
any strength below eutem price * , and war.
ranted Just as good at wholesale ind retail.
Send for price list. ERNST KREBS.
tebMm Manager.
ATTENTION , BUILDERS AND CON
TRACTORS.
The owner of tha celebrated Kaolin
Banks , near LOUISVILLE , NEB. , bus
now ready at the depot .at Louisville , on
thoB.&krwlroad , to
fill an < - order at reasonable price * . Parties -
ties desiring a white front or ornamental
brick will do well to giro n a call or sender
or sample.
% J. T. A. HOOVEK , Prop. ,
LocJsville. Neb
ft. K. RISDON ,
General Insurance Agent ,
„ HKPBESKSTS :
PHCEtnX ASSURANCE CO. , of Lon
don , Cub Ascot * 96.107.127
JKSTCHKBTEK , N. Y. , Capital 1.000 C8J on
rat MERCHANTS , ot Newark. N. J. , 1.000.000
3IBARD.mEPhUKlelphiCanlt ! . . 1,000000
-
iroKTH-CESTZClX 'JTATIONA , Caj > .
ital. . . . . . ; . . . . . " 000.000
- BANKING HOUSES.
E OLDEST ESTABLISHED.
BANKING HOUSE
IN NEBRASKA.
CALDWELLHAMILTONIGO
Btun3s transacted g e u that of m Ineor
porated Bank.
. Accounts kept in Currency or gold iub > et t *
3ht chcok without nolle * .
Certificates of Urpci't ' Issued p T 1 * in tbrtw
tlx nd twelva months , bearing InUrwt , or on
d mand without iuterest.
Adduces made to tiutomtnt on approved
curltiei at market rates of loUreit.
Uuy and sell gold , bill * of rxchacga OoT rn-
ment. State , County and City Bondi.
Draw Bight Draft ? on Fn land , Ireland , Soot-
land , and all parts of Europe.
Sell .ropean Passage Ticktta.
COLLECTIONS PROMPTLY MADE.
augMtf
U , S DEPOSITORY.
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
OF OMAHA. .
Cor. 13th ana Farnbam Streota ,
OLDEST BANKING ESTABLISHMENT
IN OMAHA.
( SUCCK8SORS TO KOUNTZK BROa , )
rUTABLIHUID IX 1808.
Organized ta a National Bank , August 20,1863.
Capital and Profits Over$300,000 ,
8 ; eciallyauthoriz d by the Secretary or Treasury
to receive Subscription to the
U.S.4 PER CENT. FUNDED LOAN
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS
KOUSTZK , President.
AinifTt'S KOO.NTZB , Vice President.
II. W. YAKS. Cachler.
A. J. POPPLKTON. Attorney.
JOBS A. CR IOHTOS.
F. H. DAVIS , Ass't Cashier.
Tliij bunk receives deposit without regard to
amountn.
Isrtits tune certiflcatcs bearing interest.
Praos drafts on Sin Fiancisco and principal
cities of the United ttatcj , al3j Lorrann. Dublin ,
Edinburgh and the principal cities of the conti
nent of Europe.
Set's pass ige tickets for Emigrants in tha In
man line. maylltf
REAL ESTATE BROKER
Geo. P. Bern is1
REAL ESTATE AGENCY.
ISlh < L Douglas Sit. , Omaha , Ntb.
This agency does STRICTLY a brokerage bud-
nofis. Does not speculate , and therefore any bar-
rains on its books aie Insured to Its patrons , In
etead of being gobbltd up by the agent
BOGGS & HILL.
REAL ESTATE BROKERS
No. 140S Farnham Street
OMAHA - NEBRASKA.
Office . North Side opp Grand Central Hotil.
Nebraska Land Agency.
DAVIS & SNYDER ,
1505 Fainham St. Omaha , N br.
400,030 ACRES carefully selected land.in Ea Urn
Great Bargains In improved farms , nd Omaha
O. DAVlV WEBSTER .SNYDER ,
Late land Com'r U. P. K. R. ipbW
BTROJJ RKD. tETU REED.
Byron Reed < fe Co. ,
OLDEST ESMBUSZD
REAL ESTATE AGENCY
IN NEBRASKA.
Keep a complete abstract of title to all Real
Eitat ] In Ociaha and Douglas County. maylU
HOTELS.
THE ORIGINAL.
BRIGGS HOUSE !
Cor. Randolph St. & 5th Ave. , "
CHICAGO ILL.
PRICES REDUCED TO
$2.00 AND $2.50 PER DAY
Looted in the business cent'c , convenient
o places of amusement. Elegantly furnished ,
ontainlng alt modern improvements , passenger
elevator , &c J. H. CU1JMIX08 , Proprietor.
oclBU
OGDEN HOUSE ,
Cor. MARKET ST. < BROADWAY
Council Bluffs , Iowa *
On Hue ot Street Railway , Omnibus < o and from
all trains. RATES Parlor floor 83.00 per day ;
cond floor , $ 2 60 per d y ; third floor , $2.00.
lie best fumbled an 1 molt commodious home
n the city. QEO. T. PHELPS , Prop.
METROPOLITAN
OMAHA , NEB.
IRA WILSON PROPRIETOR.
The Metropolitan i9 centrally located , and
first class in e c y respect , having recently bora
ntirely renova'ed" . The public wl.l find U a
comfortable and homelike bouie. marStf.
UPTON HOUSE ,
Selmyler , Neb.
Fhst-claJU Houje , Good Vleals , Good Beda
Jry Rooms , and kind and accommodating
reatment. Tw > good sample room * . Specia
ttentlon paid to commercial travelers.
S , MILLEB , Prop , ,
Schuyler , Neb.
FRONTIER HOTEL ,
Laramie , Wyoming.
Tbe miner's retort , good accommodation * ,
arge sample room , charges reasonable. Special
Mention given to traveling men.
ll-tt H. C. niLLI iRP , Proprietor.
INTER-OCEAN HOTEL ,
Cheyenne , Wyoming.
Flrst-cl > v , Fine large Simple Roemf , one
Mock from depot. Trains stop from 20 miuntes
to 2 boon for dinner. Free Bui to and from
Depot. Rates 82.00,12.60 and 13.00 , aoeordlnff
room ; a'ngle meal 7E cents.
A. O. BALCOM , Proprietor.
ANDREW HORDE ! * . Cnief CUrk. mlO-t
- ' J > . . BEEHKR ,
COMMISSION MERCHANT
Wholesale Dealer in Foreign and Domett
Fruit. Butter , Kgf * . Poultry , Game , Hatni , Ba
con. Lard , Freen ? lh , and Afent fez BOOTH'S
OYSTERS.
MEAT MARKET ,
T. P. Block. 16th St.
Freah ani Salt UcaU o all kinds constant
hand , price * reasonable. Vegetable * ia I
on. KooddeliTeredtoinr part of the dty.
WM Jiuft ,
ts.u aa H'rth itth at
cp. ; , \
Contractors and Builders ,
1310 Dodg9 ft * , , 0 ak .
JOBBERS OP
HARDWARE , CUTLERY , NAILS ,
STAMPED AND JAPANNED WARE ,
TINNERS STOCK , SHEET IRON , TIN STOCK , ETC.
1317 & 1319 DOUGLAS STBEET ,
rvrvr A
Positively no Goods Sold at Retail.
HENRY HORNBERGER ,
V. BLATZ'S MILWAUKEE BEER I
In Kegs and Bottles.
Special Figures to the Trade. Families Supplied at ReaaonabI *
Prices. Office , 239 Douglas Street , Omaha.
PAXTON & GALLAGHER ,
WHOLESALE GROCERS !
1421 and 1423 Farnham and 221 to 229 16th Sta.
KEEP THE LARGEST STOCK
MAKE THE LOWEST PRICES.
Tbe Atteatlon of Cash mid Prompt Time Buyers Solicited.
AGENTS TOE THE HAZAED POWTJEE COMPT
and the Omaha Iron and Nail Oo.
.DOUBLE AND SINGLE ACTING
POWER AND HAND PUMPS
Steam Pnmps , Engine Trimmings , Mining Machinery ,
ELTINC HOSE , BRASS AND IRON FITTINGS , PIPE , STEAM PACKING ,
AT WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.
HALLADAY WIND-MILLS , CHURCH AND SCHOOL BELLS
A. L. STBAN& , 206 Fr.raham Street Omaha , Neb1
PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY
The Only Lithographing Establishment in Nebraska
L I JEROME RACHEK.
TH Proprietor.
R
OMAHA BEE P
LITHOGRAPHING H '
COMPANY. 'HO \
Drafts , Checks , Letter Bill and Nute Headings , Oardi ,
Bonds , Certificates of Stock , Diplomas , .Labels ,
etc. , done in the best manner , and at
Lowest Possible Prices ,
.
PRACTICAL LITHOORAPHKR. OMAHA'
o.
WHOLESALE GROGER !
1213 Farnham St. , Omaha
LANGE & FOITICK
Dealers _ ,
ia
House Famishing Goods , Shelf Hardware ,
NaiJs and Etc.
1221 Farnham Street , 1st Door Bast First National Bank.
raS-U
GARPETINGS
Carpet ! ngs I Carpet ! ngs I
J. B. DETWILER ,
Old Reliable Carpet House , r/1
1405 DOUGLAS STREET , BET. 14TH AND 15TH 4r
CEST-AJBLISBIIEID IDST 1868. )
Carpets , Oil-Cloths ,
Matting , Window-Shades ,
Lace Curtains , Etc.
MY STOCK IS THE LARGEST IN THE WEST.
I Make a Specialty of
WINDOW-SHADES AND LACE CURTAINS
\
And have a Fall Line of
Mats , Rugs , Stair Rods , Carpet-
Lining Stair Pads , Crumb
Clothes , Cornices ,
Cornice Poles , Lambrequins , Cords and Tassels ;
In fact Everything kept in a Hret-OIass Oarpet House ,
riant from abroad solicited , gatisfactlea *
/ Detwiler ,
Old Reliable Cirpet lonte , iMAHA. J -