Omaha daily bee. (Omaha [Neb.]) 187?-1922, January 23, 1875, Image 2

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    THE OMAHA
UFFltiUi. PAPER OF HIE CITY
" "
TO
Fjs DO HOT desire any contributions winterer
of a literary or poetical character ; tnd we
will not undertake to preserre , or to return
ha Mine , in any caw whatever. Our Stafl
la sufficiently large to more than iupplf our
limited tpace inthit direction.
BEAT. X AME OF WEITEB , in fall , mun In each
and eTery case accompany any communica
tion ol what nsture cceTcr. This U not In
tended lor publication , but for ar own satls-
'actlon end as proof of goo-3 faith.
OOK Cocxrsr FKICXDS we will always be
pleased to hear from , on all matters connected
with crop * , country politics , an J on any sub
ject whatOTcr of general Interest to the people
ple of our State. Any Information connect-
rfulththe election , and rtteting to floods ,
iceUenU. etc. , wfll be gladly received. All
znch communirttions , howercr , must be
brief u possible ; and C > ey must , in all cases
be written npti one side of the theet only.
pouTicii.
A u. AKNOI HCEMK3T8 of candidates for office
whether made by self or friends , and
whether a not * cesor con. aunlcations to * ie
tutor , are ( until nominations are made )
simply personal , and will be charged as ad-
Tertisemrnu
All communications should be addressed to
. KOSEWATEB , Editor accl PaMUher , Draw-
ri.
NOTICE.
Cn and alter October twenty-first , 1S72 , the
city circulation of tie DAILY BEK Is assumed
by Mr. Edwin Daris , ro whew order all sub-
acriptions not paid at th office will be payable.
nd by whom all receipts lor subscriptions will
countersigned.
E. ItffeEVTATEB , Publisher
Tun next thing in order will be
the moving of the Capitol on
wheels.
ALL aboard for the train to the
new capital will1 be , the battle-cry-
at Lincoln.
AND this cruel war is over , but the
Tri h may apply , for "Paddy , " who
is is elected , la a buUy little boy.
Now that Thayer and Dundy are
beaten , and Paddock elected , every
body will , of course , claim to be the
man that did it with his little
hatchet
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
JCST as soon as Tiptop Beat Eed-
ick for the office of Squatter Gov
ernor , that moment his star began
to fade , his doom was sealed , and
the Senatorial contest closed. "A
little drop of water , a little grain of
sand , makes the might ocean , &c. "
Yon can't most always tell which
way the cat will jump. At the hour
of writing (12m. ( ) the announcement
comes to us that the senatorial game
has been brought down by the unerr
ing aim of Paddock.
_ LINCOLN is to have a grand mas
querade on the 28th. AVe appre
hend there will be phantom figures
and long faces , as well as false faces'
enough among the political visitors
there to require no special masks for
that occasion. Variety stores should
take this warning , lest they may
invest in articles which may not
command ready sales this season.
IT is to be hoped Legislature
will desist from too much law tink
ering. "We are Tisuna TO navn a
Constitutional Convention in a few
weeks. Prudence and common
sen&o would dictate that the fram
ing of new laws bo deferred until
after the new Constitution shall go
in force.
"Wirn the resolutions of the State
County Commissioners Convention
before it what does the Omaha JTcr-i
aid think now of its repeated asser
tions that Nebraska does not need
any more aid. What does that stu
pid organ think of the unanimous
endorsement of the BEE and its
course on relief matters by that con
vention ?
JouxBAKNKS , the miserable trai
tor , who , with uplifted hands , called
God to witness that he would vote
for John M. Thayer as long as any
other man would vote for him , has
gained for himself the unenviable
notoriety of being the meanest man
that ever filled a seat in a Nebraska
Legislature. The people of Doug
las county , whom this scoundrel
temporarily misrepresents , will give
him a very warm reception if he
ever dares to show his Judas face
among them. Like Benedict Ar
nold , the name of Barnes will for
ever be execrated by all honorable
men.
THE Cheyenne people haye no
reason to complain of dullness
of business , judging from the re
ports of the Leader of that city. It
claims that not a tenement house
can now be had there , and advocates
the organization of a building so
ciety to put nr > structures enough to
accommodate the existing demands
for buildings. Cheyenne has now
a population in the neighborhood of
3,000 , which , from the prospects of
an increased northern and southern
mountain trade , will rapidly in
crease foi some time For a town
which could not boast of a single if
habitation eight years ago , Chey
enne has just cause to feel proud of
the progress she has made.
"
the proceedings of the
"county couimRR'ueTA-x&nvention
just held at the capital , we notice a
recommendation to abolish the office
of district attorney , and substitute
salari county attorneys in their
stead. Thisi > roposltlon7 if adopted , lo
would increase the expenses of the
various , counties very materially. to
At present three district attorneys ,
at a salary of fifteen hundred dollars
lars per annum , are prosecuting
the criminal cases in the three dis ka
trict courts. If the new judicial
bill should become a law four addi
tional district attorneys would have
to be created. The salai ies of seven
district .attorneys would sum up
510,500 per annum Sixty-four is
county attorneya could not be induced -
duced to serve for less than $25,000 h
per annum. It is self-evident that :
the proposed chauge would be very
expensive to lax-payers. * a
' * .3 f
* * - v
LEGISLATIVE EXT2AVAGAKCS.
The present Legislature is in
many respects the most extravagant
legislative body that has ever as
sembled in this State. .Notwith
standing the general outcry of the
people against increased taxation ,
and the universal demand for econ
omy in the public services , our law
makers are exhibitine a singular de
gree of recklessness in the hiring of
supernumeraries. Thirteen clerks ,
each drawing a salary of three dollars
lars per day , have been voted by
the two houses to serve on the var
ious committees.
.No legislature ever dispensed their
charities so liberally for imaginary
services. Four years ago the legis
lature carried on th voluminous la
bors incidental to investigation and
impeachment with but two extra
clerks , and , if wo are correctly in
formed , the last legislature only em
ployed two committee clerks during
aportionof the session. There can
%
be no possible excuse for the uncalled
for extravagance. A majority of
the thirteen clerks employed in
doing nothing at three dollars per
day are not grasshopper sufferers ,
but , on the contrary , they hail from
the river counties.
"What does the committee on
buildings want with a clerk ? In all
probability not more -than four or
five bills will come under Its consid
eration. The clerical labor in that
committee , and in nearly every
other committee , will simply/be to
write on the back of any bill that
its passage Is recommended or dis
approved.
The members of the committee
will fcimply attach their X marks to
the few lines written by the clerk ,
and then the labor ends. What do
the people's servants in the legisla
ture mean by voting $2,000 out of
the State Treasury lor supernuma-
ries ? "We sympathize with many of
the clerks , but nevertheless doubt
exceedingly that the people of .Ne
braska can afford at this time to be
so generous.
SALINE COUNTY.
Dsstitution More Aid Weeded.
( Correspondence ot the BEE. )
ATLANTA , JSeb. , Saline Co. ,
January 18 , 1875.
EDITOR BEE :
From the midsi of the grasshop
per region we write to inform you
of the prospects and of how the
hard times affect the people of At
lanta Precinct. Eumors have been
circulated that there was scarcely
a case of destitution in Saline coun
ty , but ic is a mistake , and the re
port eittier circulated through tome
one that had no interest in the wel
fare of his fellow being ? , or too
proud to have it get abroad that he
lived in a country where the grass
hoppers and drouth stripped many a
hard working man of ms all , or else ,
he is not acquainted with the sit
uation that the people are in.
But no matter how it came to
bo circulated , it is all wrong Nine-
tenths of the families in Atlanta
- , , _ - .
ing time , and already some are en
tirely destitute of provision , with
not a bushel of wheat for seed , and
not clothes enough to keep them
warm. A thorough canvass of our
town has been made , which shows
that there are not near as many
bushels of wheat in the town as
there are acres of land broken up ,
which could be seeded next spring.
I will give you the report of the
committee that madethe _ canvass ,
who certify that they gave the town
a thorough canvass and reported the
following ; Number of bushels of
wheat in town , 3.460 ; barley , 140 ;
oats , 025 ; corn , 13 ; horses and
mules , Including colts , 145 ; cattle ,
182 ; acres under cultivation , 3,883 ;
number of grown persons ICO ; chil
dren 164 : number of pounds of pork
4797 , or about 14 pounds to each
person , if it was equally divided ,
which would not last them , wo
think , over one month at the out
side. We sincerely hope no more
false rumors will be circulated , to
keep eastern people from sending
aid to to those who are iictually
needing help. Wo hope f. r better
times , but are not ashamed to own
that we are In a destitute condi
tion , and those who jeer
and scoff at us , and try to prevent
help from being donated to their
fellow men who are ia distress , are
meaner than tno meanest , and do
not deserve to be recognized as
American citizens , but should be
sent to the Isle of Tortugus to re
main there the rest of their lives.
Respectfully submitted ,
J. A. BLA3IE1.T ,
Precinot Corresponding Committee.
An Omahoppsr Wants Quail on
a
I Cheyenne Leader. ]
At one of our popular restaurants ,
a couple of days since , a smart Alec ,
who hailed from Omaha , and who
had been reading the last edition of
the "Popular Anecdotes , " ordered
"quail on toast. " When the waiter
deposited the toothsome platter b -
fore the follow , the quail was done
brown and looked shriveled some
what. With a conceited Millie on
his phiz : t
"Quail on toast was v hat I or
dered ! " he said in fceverv tones to
the waiter.
" Yes ! There it is before you ! "
The fellow peered over t.ie dish as
to look for something , : .nd then ,
pointing at the fowl , askc ! : ,
"Is that a quail ? "
Tbe waiter eaid it was. jooi
"Bless my soul 1" ho -claimed , oi
"I thought it was a fly that had tom
landed on the toast. " m
-"A fly 2" iscc
"Yes , a fly ! " cc
"Where are you from ? " ccFi
Fiw
"Nebraska. " FiPi
"I thought so. You are one of Pi
them Nebraska grassL ypera that Pi"J
want nothing smallar ti m a buffa re
on their toast , ain'ty u ? " reat
He gave his chair a hitch closer le
the table , luuuched his meal \\ik\- \ leKf
lence , left the house without crack of
ing a smile , and walked direct to th
the depot. of
"A buffalo on toast for a Nebras th
grasshopper , " is preety good. cl ;
th
Ihe inventor of the ten-barreled fo
shot-gun lives in Iowa , and is still a
poor man. How capricious is for
tune. Belbiap never invented so
much as a corn-popper , and yet he
Secretary of War. ot
lie
Don't weep for Gcrritt ; we still sit CJ
have John. CJH
cl
Noycs , the circus man , is keeping in
"
inW
hotel "at Dallas , lexas. ils
*
ONLY A CHANGE OF BASE.
A Promising Actor Forsakes ilie
Footlights for the Pulpit.
( From the Louisville Courier-Jourtal , Jan IT )
One of the best actors ia Mr. Ma-
cauley's stock company is , at the
close ot this season , to leave the
stage and fit himself for the profes
sion of the ministry , his belief in
clining him to the Radical Unitarian
Church. The gentleman is Mr. H.
H. Wood , or more properly H. H.
Oud , who has been playing the posi
tion of first walking gent this sea
son , but whose versatility has shown
him in almost every line of "charac
ter , and who is considered one of
the best actors in the stock com
pany , playing everything that he
has undertaken with considerable
success. The personal appearance
of Mr. Wood betokens the clergy
man ; were he to wear the wnite
cravat , he would immediately be
taken by Canada Bill , the monte-
player , "as one of his best game "
His countenance is of a pale Intel
lectual cast , tinged with a degree of
dignified solemnity more distinctly
observable in clergyman. In his con
versation he is enthusiastic in his
opinions , and seems to throw his
whole soul m his utterances so
much so that a listener could hard
ly help from catching some of the
spirit of his enthusiasm. He is
much the same person off the stage
as on it , and impresses one as agree
ably in the one situation as in the
other. As an actor , his versatility
is manifest , in that he has played
Hecate in "Macbeth" with a sur
prising degree of excellence , and has
been equally successful in such parts
as Julian in the "Now Magdalen. "
During the season he has enacted
such parts as Mercutio , Sir Francis
Levison , Volauge , Sir Charles
Courtly , Eoderigo , Sir Benjamin
Backbite and other leading charac
ters , all with good conception , indi
cating in all careful and thorough
study. *
A Courier-Journal reporter yes
terday had an internet with him
regarding his intentions to enter in
to the theological arena. He stated
that he had been ten years upon the
stage , having commenced his the
atrical career In his 18tn year , his
age being 28. He first started with
the Raval pantomime troupe in
New i'ork city as a second dancer ,
at which occupation he was quite
successful , appearing in Cuba and
throughout the country in ballet
and pantomime. About 1867 he
left this sort of business and adopt
ed the legitimate acting , appearing
in Pike's opera house , Cincinnati , as
first walking gent Since then he
has appeared in most of the cities
of the Union. In Boston.he sup
ported Miss Carlotta LeClercq as
leading man , and was received with
favor. He afterward supported her
as leading man throughout the
country. He has been connected
with Mr. Maoauloy longer than with
any other manager , playing for a
long while in Cincinnati. "The
first idea I ever cherished , " eaid he ,
"was to become a preacher , but when
about ten yeara of age I first went
to the theatre , and became infatu
ated with the stage. I have had a
pretty good education , having been
under the charge of a tutor in my
earlier days. I have never lost
sight , however , of entering the
ministry , and the reason I have not
done so ere this is because I feared I
was not sufficiently qualified to eu-
ter. The thought has only passed
out of my mind when my 'duties
on the stage were too pressing.
I adore the profession of an actor ,
and play con amore , but it is not a
sell-satisfying love , being a less pro
nounced way of doing one's work in
this w rld. _ lprefer _ tti jninlstry
if thtfro be such a , thing , because
Is a Jjlgh calling. Besides , I deslro
to cultivate a literary taste , which I
have very little opportunity of doing
in my present position , thedramat-
ic profession being very exacting In
its demands. Perhaps there is no
better profession in the world if its
laborers do their work properly. "
"You Intend to become a Unitarian -
rian minister , do you not ? "
"Yes. I am a Unitarian because
I am a radical in my views , and a
radical because I am a Unitarian ,
I intend to preach the northernmost
views of Unitarianlsm , such as are
are entertained by Eev. O. B.
Frolhingharn , Eev. Dr. Stearns ,
and others Eev. Dr. Heywood ia
more conservative in his opinions
than myself. "
"Have you been making any
preparations for your entrance into
the ministry ? "
"For the past two years I have
betn studying very hard , and , as
soon as I leave the stage , ! shall proc
ceed to Cambridge , Mass. , where
there Is situated a theological colt
lege , where I intend to perfect iry-
self in the classics until thoroughly
qualified aa a minister. In the
event that I do'not become a suc
cessful candidate I propose to enter
the field of literature , having been
quite a student of the higher stand
ard poetry and of the leading prose
writers. However , I do not fear any
unsuccess. I have lectured three
times on my views of religion , once
in Cincinnati , and in two other
places. "
"What is your opinion of the
stage ? "
"I believe , notwithstanding al ]
the short-comings of the drama , as
profession at the presentday , that
it is co-equal with the ministerial
profession. It is a gorgeous and
grand profession a study of the
human mind in all its bearings.
Legitimate artists are infatuated
with it as an art , and do not engage
in it merely for pecuniary induce
ments. What else but the ardent
love for it would ever have given
men the desire to enterinto its * .
ranks ? What but their love for it n
could induce them , -when ignominy , nol
degradation , starvation , and the olsc
chance of being refused burial ia a sc
sanclified ground and going to schi
theological hell was their lot ? hiC
A Journalist's RoTeiige. clot iy
A reporter of one of the "smaller
journals of Paris asked the manager Whi
a theatre to give him two seats
le
lor a certain performance. The tl
manager refused , and the journal
m
said to him : "ifour reiusal will mbi
est you 40,000 francs ( $8,000) ) . " bi
For six months alter the paper to biat
at
which the reporter was attached atbl
praised the theatre in this wise :
"Monsieur X. is a magnificent di- _ .
rector. He has a good company , ?
&
ind his entertainments are excel
lent. His management is intellijc
eut. He knows what the people
Paris want. What a pity ic is :
Jiat the staircases of the theatre are
wood. If a fire should break out ,
lie audience would have little
hance of escape. " The result of m
.his was that the manager was G
breed to build iron
an staircase , ot
cost him § 10,000. otG
ce
the
JAMES " \V\TLIE , a Scotchman , 3
therwise known as the "herd lad- 3th
, " is making a triumphal proces- vibe thvi
iion through the United States and beef
Canada with his chequer board. of
Eitherto his career has been un-
shequered , the "Wiley chiel" hav-
ng beaten everybody who came in
way. ' Cl ]
English and American Newspa
per.
( Springfield Eepubhcan.J
Although the English are not so
universally a newspaper-leading
people aa the Americans , the proportion
tion of the former who either can
not read or can not afford to buy be
ing much greater , the larger concen
tration of populations in Great Brit
ain gives to the English press much
greater circulations than ours can
boast. Probably a one hundred
thousand regular daily issue is the
highest attainment of any American
paper , and the only papers that can
boast ot this are the Jsew York Sun
and the Boston Herald. .Next to
these comes the cheap popular paper
of Philadelphia , the Ledger , with
eighty to ninety thousand
a day ; and after this we supj ese the
New York JBerald , with sixty to
eventy. From these figures there
i $ a quick decent to from thirty to
forty thousand , between which rank
the New York Tribune and limes.
After these and between and thirty
thousand may be placed the two
leading Chicago papers the Tribune
and limes the Boston Journal and
th Cincinnati Commercial. Where
the Baltimore Sun comes in , we do
not know ; quite likely , however , it
ranks alongside or just below the
.New York Herald , with forty to
fifty thousand daily.
But this list embraces all the daily
papers in the country having over
twenty thousand regular circulation.
The London papers present much
larger figures. The Daily telegraph ,
a paper larger than the New York
Tribune , and sold for one penny or
two cents , has a circulation , the last
year , averaging 176,000 daily ; the
Standard , a. paper of similar size
and pretensions and price , comes
next with considerably over 100,000.
Third iatLe list is the Daily News ,
the liberal paper , a large penny
quarto , aud printing from seventy-
live to eighty thousand regularly.
The Times , ranking first in power
and inll Jence , and charging the ex
ceptional price of three pence , or "six
cents , stands fourth in circulation ,
and prints from forty to fifty thou
sand dailies. One of these , the
Echo , is sold for half a penny , or
one cent , and prints' many thou
sands , and it is a profitable enter
prise. Some of tha workingmen's
weekly papers in London hava enor
mous circulations one , the Lloyd
Weekly Journal , going up to the
hundreds of thousands. Ol the
provincial journals , those of
Manphestcr are the best , and
they have circulations about as
large as the Boston Journal , and the
best Chicago papers. The Edin
burgh and Liverpool and Birming
ham papers , though much poorer m
quality , haye also circulations.equal
to our most popular pro vineial news
papers.
All the materials of newspaper
making are much cheaper in Eng
land than they are here the "wri
ting , the editing , type-sotting , the
paper , * telegraphing everything ,
while the papers themselves are less
enterprising and multifarious In
their character ,
Saved by a Ja k.
The following story is told aa
true I , to show the manner in which
juries j sometiines decide a case ;
The jury lii the case had coruo tea
a dead lock The powerful appeals
of the counsel for tno defense had
not ] been without effect , and the
jury j stood six for conviction and six
for i acquittal. Ballot after ballot
was taken ; they argued on both
sides , but not a sign of a change.
As the jury would be out all night ,
cards were proposed.
At midnight one of their number ,
Colonel , who led the six for
acquittal , proposed that they should
play ' a of seven the result
game up ,
. _ _ _ _
- * < , , tTh
- rnmo y
who was for conviction , agreed , and
the < proposition was heartily and
unanimously adopted , and in'all se
riousness , too. Colon pi P ? and
the 1 foreman played , and the others
were lookers on. The Colonel
played 1 to save the accused , while
the < foreman plaj-ed quite as zealous
ly ' to secure his conviction. The
bacters 1 , standing close behind their
respective champions watched anx
iously , giving advice and encourage
ment aud keeping the two tallow
candles properly nnuffed that dimly
lighted the scene.
The game proceeded with equal
fortune , until the parties had each
score six. At this moment the ex
citement was intense. Upon a sin
gle card now hung a human life. It
was Col. P 's deal. He dealt
slowly anu with trembling hands ,
his lips impressed , and his breath
abated , and turned a Jack !
With the turning of this fateful
card , which acquitted the prisoner ,
the jury united in a shout , and in
the morning- went Into court and
gave the verdict of "Not guilty ! " a
verdict which was received with
blank surprise by a majority of the
spectators.
M
i
Cook County national Bank Sus-
c
pension.
[ Chicago Times , Jan. 20th. ] ar
w
The suspension of the Cook Coun
ty National Bank yesterday created
a genuine sensation in this city.
The president was reputed to be the
wealthiest resident of Chicago. He
came here from Iowa several years
ago , and owns two banks in Des
Moines , besides having a branch
house in New York. The Chicago
institution , however , was never
much of a success. During the
panic sixteen months ago it exhib
ited signs of weakness , and was
only saved from bankruptcy
by the most strenuous exertions.
For several weeks past it has been oet
exceedingly weak , and those who
were on the inside expected the de [
nouement almost daily. The causes
the suspension are numerous *
The president has been speculating
somewhat recklessly , and has lost > 37
heavily. In addition he has carried
number of the worst dead-beats in
Chicago , reputedly wealthy but real
bankrupt Jlia advances to this
class of men have been heavy.
The local business of the bank
was insignificant. Its patronage
here has consisted of the most reckless - BUS
less class of grain gamblers , and
the ] losses through their failure to
make good their obligations have
been considerable. The country
business , however , has been large ,
and several Iowa banks will proba
bly be carried down with it.
The last statement of th.e bank ,
published last week , was the most
Favorable ever made by the bans ,
ind there are suspicions that it was
Joctored. If this should be the
ase , an Investigation by the bank
jxaminer will develop the fact.
VI
Ax old soldier corrects the com
mon error in regard to the rank of
Qeneral Grant's son. He is a sec-
jnd lieutenantin the Tenth cavalry.
Seneral hpridan Is entitled to a
jertaln number of staff officers with
rank of lieutenant colonel , and
ijas appointed youni Grant to one of
these places , and while on that ser m
vice he bears nominally that rank ,
hia real rank In the army is that
his place hi his regiment
Mrs. Hobson was "Hobson's N
iUoice. " Net lv
U. S. DEPOSITORY ,
OF OMAHA ,
CORNER FABNHAM AND ISTH SIS.
THE OLDEST BANKING
ESTABLISHMENT
IN OMAHA.
SUCCESSORS TO KOUNTZE BROS.
Established in 1856.
Or snizeOt > 3Natonal Bank , August 20 , 1863.
Capital al Profits Dyer $ ? -iO,000 , ,
DIRECTORS :
H. KousTZEjPres. I Joirs A , CKKIOIITON ,
ACGCSTCS KonnzB , H. W. YATES ,
Vice-President , | Cashier.
A. J. POPPLBTOJT , Att'y.
This Bank receives deposits without regard to
amounts.
Issues time certificates bearing interest.
Draws drafts on San Francisco and principal
cities in the United States , also London , Dublin ,
Edlnbutgh and principal cities ol the continent
ol Europe.
Sells passage Tickets ( or Emigrants by Inman
Line. octlSdtf
EZRA MILLARD , J J. H.
President. Cashier.
OlbtAIELA.
NATIONAL BANK
Cor. Douglas and Thirteenth Streets.
OMAHA , - - NEBRASKA.
Capital - . _ . _ . - 1200,00000
Surplus and Profits - . - 80,000 00
TTUNAHCIAL" AGENTSFOB THE UNITED
U STATES.
ANr DESIGNATED DEPOSITORY FOB
DISBURSING OFFCEKS.
"THIS BANK DEALS
In Exchange , Government Bonds , Vouchers ,
Gold Coin ,
* *
f BULLION and QOLDDUSI\ \
* _ _ _ _ *
And sells drafts and makes collections on all
parts ot Europe.
KsTDrafts drawn parable In gold or curren
cy on the Bank of California , San Francisco.
THICKETS FOB SALE TO ALI. PARTS
- * - of Europe via the Cunard and National
Steamship Lines , and the flamburg-Amer'can
Packet Cea xr.
AIiVLN 8AUNDERS , ENDS LOWE
President Vice Presdent
BEN WOOD , Cashier.
ST-A.TIE3
N. W. Cor. FarnHam aud 13th Sts. ,
Capital..8 100,000
Authorited CapltU 1,000,000
| T-vEPosrrs AS SMALL AS ONE DOL- i
IJ I lar secelred and compound interest alI I
| lowed on the same. |
V *
Advantages
OVER
Certificates of Denosit :
mHE WHOLE OR ANY PART OF A DE-
I posit after remaining in this Benk three
months , will draw interest from d.te of depos
it to payment. The whole or any port o' a de
posit can-ta drawn atfanv t'mo. auc2 U
4
The Oldest hstablishca
BACKING HOUSE
IN NBItASKA.
Cadv ! lLHamiltoa _ & Co. ,
* je6 Ser&K.3i3tt. & .
Business transacted same as that
of an Incorporated Vank.
Accounts kept hi Currency or Gold
subject to sight check without BO-
tlcc.
tlcc.Ccrtiflcates of Deposit Issued pay
able on demand , or at fixed date
bearing Interest at six pcrceut. per
annum , and available in in all parts
of the country.
Advances made to customers on
approved securities at market rates
of interest.
Buy and sell Gold , Bills of Ex
change , Government , State , County ,
and CitT Bonds.
We give special attention to nego
tiating Kailroad and other Corpo
rate Loans issncd within the State.
Draw Sight Drafts on England ,
Ireland , Scotland , and all parts of
Europe.
Sell European Passage Tickets.
COLLLECXION8 PROMPTLY MADE.
atilU
STOVE STOS.S.
E. F. COOK ,
637 14ta St. , betweea DoogUa Dod ?
Manufacturer of Tin. Copper and Sheet Iron
'Ware , and dealer in
Cooking and Heating stoves
Stamped , Jaaanned and French War on
and. Tin Roofing , Gutters * nd Spouting and
Work done am ] warrant1
BATH & HANS EN , '
VVboIesaIemDeaIera n i-eof ; Tobacco ,
Manufacturers ole
Be
o i a.A. . : R , s ,
AUDDEALER IN OC1
Tobaccoi Pipes , &c , , &c , OC1z
,103 FAIlNHAM ST. ,
Bet. 10th A llth ,
ctltf bo
JNIOIS MAKKET
B. A. HARRIS , BT
rifteeuth Breet , 'oti. * Douglas and Dodge.
BEEF , FORK ,
LEiitton and Veal ,
Fish , Poultry , Game ,
Eat
ugas IT AHD
L.
238 Douglas St. Omaha Neb.
E
WAGOST Ral tun
Wood Stock ,
Hai
IVAGON HAUBWARE , So
Pateat Wiieli , Fiabaed Gearing , &c. Opo
OpoO
xlcs , Springs Tfilmble Skcius O
HARDWOOD LUMBER ,
3arriages , Hacks wj Buggies
Stnilebackcr Weoa Depot.
1 _ | _ '
California House. B
an
FEITZ HAT3TEE , Frop'r.
No. 170 Dougias Street , corner llth , Omaha
rebrasta.1. Lojrdby the Oar or week.
June ! T 7
FURS ! FURS !
A. HUBERMAN ,
1FUR MANUFACTURER
AND BUYER OF RAW FURS ,
511 and 513 Thirteenth Street , OMAHA , NEB ,
Mink , Seal.-Martiir , and Other Fashionable Ladies' Fun , SOjper cent
Below New York Prices. Orders from the Country Attended to. Satis
faction Guaranteed.
B&-SEND FOR PRICE
decldiwti
ROBERT G. STEEUL ,
> EALER1IN
Faints , Oils ,
BRUSHES , LAMP GOODS , ETC ;
257 Douglas St. , - Omalia ,
marlSeod IT
JA COB GUSH ,
261 farznam Bt Betweea 14th and 15th ,
TJUDEKTAKEH ,
decltt
G. "W. HOMAN Sr.
*
Offers for the necessities of the public ,
*
First-Class Hearse M Carriaies ,
AH orders promptly attended to by leaving
them at tor. iltii and Harner Sts. aelotf
EEDMAN & LEWIS ,
Cor. 16th and Izard Streets.
ILi TJ IMI IB IE
On hand and SAWED TO ORDER.
Je251m
ciiarios
WHOLESALE 6UTGHEB
fin CATTXiB BROKER ,
SALT LAKE CITY. - TJTA
.fern *
Practical Watchmaker ,
171 FaraPim , B.E.Oor. Uth St.
MABA NEB
ENOCH HENNEY ,
Justice of the Peace
Office over the State Bank , corner of Farn.
and 13th streets. _
H. U.
MANUFACTUUtJ' AND DEALER IN
BOOTS & SHOES
10 ISth St. Between Farnham and Douglas
F. A. PETEKS.
Saddle and Harness Maker ,
AN ! ) CARRIAGE TRIMMER ,
No. 274 Furnhnm at. bet. 15th & inth
A LL orders and repairing promptly attended
\ . to and satisfaction gusrraatved.
- paid for hide * . pSOlr
Syracuse House.
140 FAENHAH St. , Bet 9th and 10th Sts
Tl-e nnilerslgned respectfully announces that
he has newly furnished and refitted the above
house , and now offers accomodation to the Pub
lic at very moderate prices. Boarding and lodg
ing , Irom 84 to 55 per week ; meals a tall hours ,
single meals , 25 eta.
ALEXANDER WETHEIM ,
novlTdtf lropr
GRAND CENTRAL
O T S3 Xi .
OMAHA , - - - HEBBA8KA
The largest and best hotel between Chicago
xnd San Francisco.
Opened new September 30th , 1873.
SO tl GEO. THKALL. Proprietor.
T
ST , CHAKLtS HOTEL ,
S'orth side Harcey , between 12th and 13th sts. ,
OMAHA ,
Joaid by the dav or week at re jonaole rates.
ORTON 4 V.iXNALD ,
ict28d3m. ' Prop'
LXXTDXJB SOTJSE.
On 9tt , M. t'arnfam and Jlarney Slrettt ,
been entirely refiltted and refurnished
HAS will accommodate all to the Lest o.
ioard : at SI,50 per day ; 40c per single meal.
C , V , & S , M , HARRim u.Bi
iy28JlT. Pro rietors Bi
TEOK BKET. W13 S. KXEO
BYRON REED & GO ,
The Oldest Established
Seal Estate Agency
IN NEBRASKA
oep a complete Abstract of Title to all Uea
state in Omaha and Douclas ountr.
T. P. Soap Factory !
SJH
Situated on the line of the Union Pacific
allroad , near the powder house. Manufac-
trcs first-clus soap Tor home consumption
Ol
EL YERGA , 1 (
m.
Wholesale and Retail Dealer in
Fa
FBESH AND SALT MEATS
ms. Sausage , Lard , Poultry , Ac. , Ac. , Ac
. , 179 Farnham St. , -t..llth . and
13th. Omaha , PD
josipte Pioneer Block. oct7U
Meat Market.
Be
thu
trai
traiT
Krrp constantly on hand Chi
and
A LARQ&AVPPLY Get
GetS
St.
33 33 X * .
UTTON. GeiC
P30LTRY ,
Established 1858.
. ar. j
CARRIAGE MANUFACTORY
253 & 2'5 Dodge Street ,
Office up stain , ) Omaha , Nebraska. Carriage *
nd Buggln on hand or iai < < lc to order.
N.B.-l articular attention paid to Repair
Pr23-U
CHICAGO & NORTHWEST
The Popular Route from
O : -A.ZE3I.A. : .
V
TO-
Chicago and the East !
AND THE
TrWaterloo.Fort Dodjre.Dul > nqneI > n
Crosse , Prairie Da Cblen. AVlnonn ,
St. P ul , Dulntli , Jonu-rllle , Hrno-
sha , Green U r , Racine , Steven's
Point , WatcrtOTrn , Oshlcesh , Fen
DuLac. Madison and BHlivaoJie * .
It Being the Shortest and Fiist Comoleted Line
Between
OMAHAand CHIC AGO ,
Constant Improvements hare taEen place tn
the way of reducing Grade , and placing Iron
with Steel Kails , adding to its rolling stock
new and Elegant
DAT and SLEEPING CARS
Equipped with the " W tlnghouseAlr Brake"
and "aliller Platform , " establishing comforta
ble and commodious Eating Houses , offering all
the comforts ot traveling the age can produce.
Fromi to 10 Fast Express Trains ruu each
way daily over the various lines of this road ,
thus securing to the traveler selecting this
route sure and certain connections in any di
rection he mar wish to 70.
Principal Connections.
AT M1S3OOK1 VALLEY JUNCTION , for
Stouz City , Yankton and points reached via
Sioux City and Pacific railroad.
AT GRAND JUNCTION for Fort Podge.
Duluth , anil northwestern points.
AT CEDAR RAPIDS for Waterloo , Cedar
Falls , Chirles City , Burlington and St. Louis.
AT CLINTON for Dubuqne , Dunleith , Prai
rie du Chicn , La Crosse. and all points on the
Chicago , Clinton and Dubuque , and Chicago ,
Dubnque and Minnesota railroads.
AT FULTON foi Freeport , Racina Milwau
kee , ami all points in Wisconsin ,
AT CHICAGO with all railway lines leading
out of Chicago.
THBOUGH TICKETS
tC M eastern cities via this line can De proJ
cured , and any information obtained , concern
ing Routes , Rates , etc , at the Ticket Office
llt the Union Pacific Depot , Omaha , and also at
thu principal .Ticket Offices on the line-of the
U. P. R. R.
Ail information regardlnB passengers and
freight cheerfully furnished , and sleeping car
berths for sale at the Company's office , 253
F rnham St. ( Grand Central Hotel ) , Omaha.
Xf3 Bggage checked through from Omahx" W
W. H. &TENNETT. MARTIN HUGHITT ,
Gen'l Passlnge'r Ag t. Gen. Sup't.
N.TRISShL , G C. EDDY ,
Ticket Affi , Omaha. Gen'l Ae't Omaha.
J. H. MOUNTAIN , N HAIGHT ,
West'n Trav. Agt. Pass. Agt. , Omaha.
mchlSvl
Sioux City & Pacific R. R |
The Shortest and jnIjrDlrect
Kontefrom
COUNCIL BLUFFS
St. Paul , Minneapolis ,
And all Points In
NORTHERN IOWA & MINNESOTA.
PULLMAN PALACE SLEEPING CABS
On all night trains Tia thlk route.
IHEOUQH TIJfE TABLE , I1T EFFECT
DEO. 6th , 1874. 0
4ERIVK. STATIONS. LKAVK.
Mail. Express. I Express. Mail.
U 4 N. W. R'Y.
U. P. TRANSFER.
Council Bluffs. 0B
10.20 p. m. 9.15 a. m. I 4.3u p. m. CM a. m.
Missouri Valley.
5:25 " 8.05a.m. | 6 00 p. m , 8.30 "
Onawa. B
3.35 " 6:18 a nr | 7.55p.m. 10.20 "
Sionr City.
1:50J " 4 40 a. m | 3:15 p m. 12 00 m.
St. Paul ( TiaS. C. * St. P. K. R. ) .
7:40 a. m. I 7.00p.m.
Yankton ( via D. S. R. B. ) .
8.00a.m. . | C:10p. : m.
for sale in Chicago ard Northul
res tern Railway offices , Council Blnfis , and
. P. depot , Omaha.
j WBe sui i your tickets read via S. C. i P.
Zallway.
L. BURNETT , Snp't. L (
F. C. HILLS < 3en. Ticket Ag't.
GEO. W. GHATTAN ,
Aient Omtha
The Sioux City a racmc ilallroau ,
-n UOSBKQM ts ut
5IOUX CRY & ST , PAUL
RAILROAD ,
TH
U2 miles the shr lest rente from Omaha
Council Bluffi to St. Paul , Miaeapolls , mil
Ullwater , Inoka , alnth , Bismarck , and all
Inta IB Mlnmesota. .f- , .4
Train leaves Omaha daily , ( excep Saturday )
6 o.clock p. m. , and Council Bluns at 8.05 p-
-f om Chicago 4 North-Western Depot.
areas LOW and lime as QUICK as
by any other Line.
QLLMAH PALACE SLEEPING CABS
ON ALL NIGHT TRAINS ,
sure yonr ticket reads VIA Slcux City.
avoiding circuitous routes and midnight
ansfcrs.
Tickets can be purchased at the offices of the
ilcago & Northwestern Bailway in Omaha
Council Bluffi.
J C. BOYDKN ,
un'lPass. A Ticket Agt-St P.4S.C. B R.
. Paul , Minn.
F. a HILL ,
en'l Pass , and Ticket Agt , S. a 4 P. , Sioux
City , Iowa ,
GEO. W. QBATTON , Agent.
1G3 Farnham Street , OmahaNeb. .
July 20. tl.
MAX MEYER & , BROTHER , OMAHA , NEBRASKA
CHEAP FARMS ! FHEE SOMES
On the Line ol th *
Union Pacific Railroad ;
4 Laai Grant of 12.000.000 Acres oJ the best FARMIUO and MI5EEAL Laaoi * of An rk
1,000,000 ACUFS IN NEBRASKA IN THE GKEAT PLATTE VALLE
THE QABDBH OP THE WEST NOW FOK SALE
These lands are In the central portion of the United States , on tlw 41st degree otNoithLri
Hade , the central line of the great Teinporata Zone o ! the Ametlcau r Dt1iiat , and forfrrai
growing and stock raisin ? uuaurptisaotby any In the United States.
CHEAPER IS PBIOEanre faToraHterms elm. snd more conTenlsJt to market ta a ca
be found Ebewbere.
FIVE and TEN YEARS' credit glTf n with Interest at atX. PER CENT
OOLOJJIBT3 ad flOTOAL8ETULEB8cannnyoaT a Tears' OwJlu ttaiis at the
* rlc to all OBEDIT PTJEOHABEBe.
A Deduction TEN PER CENT. FOR CASH.
FEEE H03LESTKADS FOE ACTUAL SETTLERS.
tlio Best Locations for Colonies \
Soldiers Entitled to a Homestead J
160 Acres.
to 3E"xxarolx , 03rs of
Bend for neir DescriptlTe Pamphlat , with new maps , pnblhhed In Earlhh , German , riwe *
' , . Address . 35 * . 3I > A.VjuSS
and Dan'ih mailed ( ree everywhere. O.
ulyiMarU Land Comml sioner U. P. K. K. CM. WmaDa. Neb.
A. E. HUBK&MANET & CO
V3 T
WATCHMAKERS , OF JEWELKV
S. E. Cor. 13th. & Douglas Sts. '
WATCHES & CLOCKS
JEWELRY AND PLATED-WMi.
*
AT WHOLESALE OR RETAIL.
Dealers Can Save TDUE aud FilEimu uy
Ordering of Us.
ENGRAVING BONE FREE OF CiUa'JIS !
ifi-ALL UOODS WAERANliJ ) TO BE AS REPRESENTED.-
1an31-tf
8. C. ABBOTT
ABBOTTS. . C. ABBOTT Col
Booksellers 1 Stationer
DKALSESIN
PAPEB.S.
No. 188 Farnham Street. Oszxa&a , &fe f ,
Publishers' Agents lor School Books ns < ' J \olirasko. .
GEO. A , HOAGLAND ,
Wholesale Lumber
-OFFICE AND TARD
COR , OF DOUGLASrAND 6TflSTSJJ. P , R , R , TBAC& . :
anlltf
. I. D. SOLOMON ,
OIZiS A2TD
COAL OIL AND HEAD-LIG-HT Oil ,
OMAHA - NEBRASKA
FAIBLIE & MONELL ,
BLANK BOOK MANUFACTURERS.
Stationers , Engravers and Printers ,
AJTP IiPPCE
Hascnic , Odd Fellows and Eniglits of
TJ 3ST I F O'K ; 3 C S.
XDGE PROPERTIES , JEWELS , BOOKS , BLANKS , ETC. , AT
JBS-EASTERN PRICES AND EXPRESS.- ® ! _
38 lOo'u.slA.st JStx-oo * . - ivrA-'Fgyv , T j'SETST
mayitf
Branson Knitter
Price/oaly $20.
HE ONLY SIMPLE , CHEAP , DURABLE , AND PERFECT KNITTIXQ fll
THA.T WILL KNIT A COMPETE SOCK OS STOCKING W1TU HEEL AND TOE.
From $3 to S3 , per day can be made on this KNITTER will send a saraolc pair of socks , by
lail.freeonrecepilof 60 ceataAOEN1S WASTED , to whom a liberal diacoaut will bonuuto.
for circulars to
toA. S. BURNHAM , State Agent *
rO. 224 DODGE ST. , - - - OMAHA , NEB
*
nov2itf.