The Nebraskan. (Lincoln, Neb.) 1892-1899, January 07, 1899, Image 1

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iBRASKAN.
Voi,. VII.
UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA, LINCOLN, JANUARY 7, 1890.
PiticK 5 Cents
.Jr .
NE
A NEW INTER-STATE LEAGUE
An Organization of the High Schools Completed
At a Meeting Held Wednesday,
December 28.
THE PROBABLE CONSTITUTION DRAWN UP.
An Annual Track fleet Will Also Be Held at Same Time as the
Intcr-Collegiate.
For sonic time n movement has been
on foot to organize a Nebraska Intcr
Soholnstic Athletic Association. It la
recognized by all that the high schools
nre the preparatory schools in athlet
ics ns well as any other branch. look
ing to this end Dr. Hastings recently
6cnt out the following letter:
Instructor in Physical a mining':
Dear Sir: High schools are becom
ing more and more each year the feed
ers of our University athletics. Wo
nre very deeply interested in your sue-co.-s,
therefore, from an athletic point
of view. We recognize fully that the
greatest contribution which you make
to our University life is the rounded
health and vitality which makes a
strong life-work possible; that your
first care must be the health of the
whole student body.
Hut superabundant life and strength
must have vent In some way. Strong
boys arc too full of energy to spend it
quietly. They require exercise adapt
ed to a powerful organism.
Athletics properly conducted provide
the most wholesome and' pleasurable
method of expenditure of this super
abundant energy and ns n means of de
velopment becomes to tlic strong what
milder forms of exercise nre to the
weak, HODY HU1LDING.
The period from twelve to twenty
one is peculiarly the period when men
are made or unmade, when vitality is
gained or lost. You have the greater
part of this period and during the
more formative impressionable portion
of life. The eiTcct upon the growing
organism of the physical training
given in high schools is infinitely
greater than that of the University
training upon mature men. The dan
gers arising from lack of tho proper
guidance of boys' sports arc, therefore,
exceedingly great and your responsi
bility to know the best methods of
training and organization correspond
ingly important.
Only by joint conference with refer
ence to the handling of such games
can keep you in touch with tne best
methods of conducting contests and by
actual parUv..pation in the manage
ment of inter-scholastic meets. Only
by these joint meets can a vital inter
est in clean sports be stimulated and
habits of self control ami good naiurcd
rivalry be inculcated. For the proper
management of such meets a State In-ter-Seholastic
Association' is essential.
Allow me to propose the appoint
ment of a committee consisting of
George C. Shedd of the Lincoln- thigh
school, Mr. Nathan. Hernstcia 01 tne
Otnal-.i high school' and It. D. Ovor
holi. Miperintcndent of the Ashland
hijjli .( I,in)l to solicit information with
refiMi'iici- to the best method of or
gaui.itidii of a state inter-scholastic
nhMu " ttirii and to report the same at
the 1 1 st conference of the representa
tives, of the various schools.
Kindly fill out die enclosed blank
anil return at your earliest conveni
ence. i-i truly yours,
VM. W. HASTINGS.
The result wis all that could be ex
pected. A meeting was arranged for
Wednesday, December 28, 1898. At
that time the following representa
tives appeared: Nathan Hernstein,
Omaha high school; I. S. Cutter, Fred
Kccs, Beatrice; William Ebright, West
Point; Albert Snare, Milford; J. j
Mathews, Grand Isli.nd; R. D. Over
koltz, 0. S. Norton, Ashland; George
C Shedd, Principal Waterhouse, Lin
coln. A constitution was framed and the
officers were elected. Nathan Bren
steln was made president, George C.
Shedd, secretary and treasurer. An ex
ecutive council was also named to con
sist of 1. S. Cutter, It. D. Overholtz,
Albert Snare and tho other officers ex
oflleio. A student will be chosen in
each school represented to net as a
vice president and corresponding sec
rotary. The object of tho association is to
hold dual and triangular meets in foot
ball, basket ball, and base ball. Once
a year there win oc a state meet of the
track athletics. This wnl be under the
auspices of the State Intcr-Collcglnto
association nnd will meet on the same
day as the latter and at the same place.
The constitution as it will probably
be ratified is as follows:
CONSTITUTION.
ARTICLE I.
NAME.
This association shnll bo known ns
the Nebraska Inter-Scholastic Ama
teur Athletic Association.
ARTICLE 1-.
OBJECT.
The object of the association shall
be tho supervision and development of
all nmnteur sports nnd games among
the preparatory schools of the state of
Nebraska.
'V I'K -. III.
.' ..aBERSHIP.
The membership in the association
shall be limited to high schools and
schools of that grade, standing to oe
determined by tho executive commit
tee. ARTICLE IV.
REPRESENTATION.
1. Each school shall be represented
by one faculty nnd one student dele
ga,Ui irutthe annual state association
meeting.
S. The representatives shall be elect
ed by a joint massmectlng of faculty
and students.
ARTICLE V.
OFFICERS.
Section 1. The officers of the asso
ciation shall be a president, vice pres
ident from each school admitted to
the association, a secretary-treasurer
nnd nn executive committee consisting
of three memebrs.
Section. The president, secretary
treasurer and the three other members
of the executive committee shall be
elected by ballot at the annual meet
ing of the association.
Section 3. The vice presidents shall
be elected from the student body by
the athletic associations of tho indi
vidual schools, and shall serve as offi
cial correspondents for those schools.
ARTICLE VI.
ATHLETIC RULES.
Section 1. The rules outlined in the
W. 1. A. A. Band Book shall govern
the track and field athletics of this as
sociation with the exception that from
the prescribed order of events, num
bers fl, 8, 11, 14 nnd 10 snail be omitted,
and other events may be omitted from
a given contest by common consent of
parties contesting. Such agreement
as to change of order of events must,
however, be made before the close of
entries.
Section 2. All entries for the annu
el State Inter-Scholastic field' day must
be closed and sent to the stato track
committee ten (10) ays belore the
date of the contest.
Section 3. Offering of pennants and
trophies shall be under the direct su
pervision and control of the executive
committee.
Section 4. Football, basketball, ten
nis and any other gnmes which may be
supervised by the State Inter-Scholastic
association shnll be governed by
the rules mutually printed by A. G.
Spalding & Co.
ARTICLE VII.
SUPERVISION AND CONTROL.
Direct supervision and control of in
dividual sports nnd games shnll be se
cured by the state executive commit
tee through the appointment of sub
committees consisting of three mem
bers, enoh of which shnll contain one
student. There shall be a sub-football
sub-track, sub-basketball, and sub
tennis committee, and such sub-committees
for any other sports or games
ns soon as they are recognized as such
by the executive committee.
ARTICLE VIII.
GIRLS' GAMES.
Girls' games shall receive tho same
recognition and supervision as those
of tho boys.
ARTICLE IX.
DUES.
The annual dues shall be $2.00 for
each school. The payment of said dues
H'hall necompnny tho inak.ng of entries
to tho annual championship games and
entries shall not be allowed unless ac
companied by said duos.
ARTICLE X.
TIME OF AN A UAL MEETING.
The time of tho annual meeting of
the Nebraska Inter Scholastic AtlvleLo
Association shall be on tho second day
of the Nubraska Teachers' ..-soclatlon.
The hour of the meeting shall be se
lected and announced by the president
in connection with the announcements
of the Physical Education Society.
ARTICLE XI.
ANNUAL FIELD DAY.
The tlnw of the annual intcrscholas
tic field day shall be the same as that
of the state inter-collegiate.
ARTICLE XII.
AMENDMENTS.
Amendments to the constitution
may be made nt ony usual meeting by
a two-thirds vote of members present.
ARTICLE V, SECTION 1WO.
MEMBERSHIP OF TEAMS.
The iollowing rules shall apply to
the membership of foot ball, base ball,
track, basket ball and all other athlet
ic teams:
No person shnll represent a school
upon any team unless he Is a bona fide
student in that school, doing full
work. This rule shall be construed to
mean that the student shall have been
duly registered and hnve been taking
at least three full studies in. the
school for a week proious to the
games.
No student who has competed upon
any athletic team of the school and
who drops out of school at the close
of the season can compete upon any
school athletic team until he has been
in attendance at lca&t six months.
PAUL CLARK.
An alumnus of the University oi
Nebraska, who has recently been hon
ored with a inuoh-soughtrnfter posi
tion is Paul F. Clark of the class of
'87. A few days ago he was elected
speaker of the hoiu of representa
tives of the state of Nebraska.
WJien an undergraduate Mr. Clark
had the reputation of being the wit
tiest man in school, and he is now, by
common consent, the champion funny
man of the alumni association. One
of the most notable things ho did in
those older days was to go to the Mil
ford encampment, when the battalion
was under Lieutenant Townley's fos
tering care, ns drum major, clothed in
white duck trousers, a red coat and a
ehapeau! History does not record
what happened to him or his uniform,
but he at least is still in existence.
During n part of his undergraduate
career he set type for our esteemed
contemporary as a means of liveli
hood. He was a Palladian, later be
coming a member of Sigma Chi fra
ternity. After his graduation Mr. Clnrk stu
died law in the county judge's ollico
for a couple of years, then went into
partnership with another alumnus of
this University, Charles S. Allen, 'SO.
hi September, M), he married Miss
May L. Roberts. That he did not give
up the "higher learning" and bis in
terest in the University is shown by
the fact that he earned the degree of
Master of Arts in 'US. He was first
elected n member of the legislature
two years ago, was re-elected this
time, nnd chosen speaker, which posi
tion he will undoubtedly fill with cred
it to himself and to his alma mater.
Mr. Edgnr Morrill entertained Satur
day night to watch the old year out
and the new year in. His guests were
Misses Hammond, Morrill, Woods,
Steiner, Minor, Daisy Minor, Houtz
and Holdbrook; Messrs. Heack
cr, Arthur Morrill, Reagan, Edmisten,
Bartlett, Mr. and Mrs. Steiner.
The young men of Sigma Alpba Ep
silon, who were in the city during- the
holidays, charmingly entertained their
lady friends at 7 o'clock dinner, 'ine
tables were very neatly decorated in
roses nnd holly. The party was chap
eroned by Mcsdames C. n. Morrill and
G. M. Bartlett. Those present were:
Misses Holdbrook, Winger, Risser,
noutz, Richards, Harley, Ontcalt, Mi
nor, Dnisy Minor and Studit; -Messrs.
Bartlett, Morrill, Sawyer, Cowgill,
Holdbrook, Edmisten, Baldwin, Green
and Sto pliers.
A riddle What is easiest to find in
a newspaper? Answer One's own
name.
Needy Nephew "My dear uncle, are
you sick again? How I feel for you."
Rich Uncle "Yes, I've noticed you
always do when you want to touch
me."
INTERESTING CORRESPONDENCE
Disclosing the Plans of a Certain Set of Hen Some
what Prominent in University
Affairs.
IT INVOLVES THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A
New Fraternity Upon Somewhat Original LinesAs Will Be Seen
It is Self Explnnltory.
Editor of the Nebrnskan:
The enclosed document was found
Saturday afternoon between the lenves
of the Atlantic Monthly Mngnzlno in
the city library.
The loser was evidently taking notes
on expansion for it was found nt the
beginning of an article on tne "Con
trol of the Tropics," by Kidd.
Can you use it? If so, I hope it is
not too Into for this week's Nebrnskan.
1 think It a great 'scoop," considering
the individuals concerned.
For obvious reasons 1 withhold my
identity.
Dear ,
1 have contemplated writing you for
several days regarding a matter of
great importntnee to mjself and othe
rs ot my intimate friend's. 1 have nntl
some hesitancy in disclosing the mat
ter to you because of the possibility
that it might not meet your entire ap
proval, but 1 hnve sufficient confidence
in you to believe that, whether it
meets your approval or not, you will
under no circumstances betray a mat
ter which is confided to you in strictest
secrecy. 1 hnve no doubt you will be
greatly surprised on learning of our
new scheme.
A NEW FRAT IS BEING ORGAN
IZED IN THE UNIVERSixi, and you
will doubtless wonder when you learn
who nre the movers in this new nd
venture. The list, ns yet, is incom
plete, but we are in hopes the same
may Do completed soon. Will say,
however, that not one of those whom
we have yet approached on the sub
ject have seen fit to refuse. Up to date
the following individuals have pledged
themselves to the enterprise: E. B.
PERRY, PERSE A. MOORE, LEE
RERR, J. S. SMOYER, J. F. BOOMER,
. BENEDICT, C. M. FUNK, J. A.
MAGUIRE, E. F. WARNER, and your
humble nnd obedient servant. Besides
these, we have a few prospective mem
bers, whom we hnve not yet ap
proache, but whom we have rea
son to believe, will readily enter in
with us. They nre F. G. Hawxby, .
Hart, Horner, L. J. Marsh, II. J.
Theobald, Claude Wilson, J. C. Piatt,
and Hubbell.
Now we don't expect to be in a po
sition to announce our organization
until some time next spring, nnd
meantime, we desire to keep this a
strict secret from the frats ns well as
th barbs, inasmuch as we propose 'to
be fully allied with neither party, nnd
furthermore, we expect we will be at
tacked by both sides when the matter
gets out, and especially are we un
easy lest the college papers get hold
of it. We realize also that this course
may seem inconsistent with the stand
we hnve taken in the past, but wc be
lieve we can show that it is in full
nccord with our past principles, nnd
that we are fully justified in the end
we have in view nnd the motive which
urges us to take this step.
It is well known that the fratrnities
and societies, ns they now exist, rep
resent two extremes. You know, ,
ns well as I do, to be honest about it,
that THE SOCIETIES ONLY GIVE
A ONE-SIDED DEVELOPMENT, thnt
is, they do not develop the social side
of man. Of course, we believe, as we
always have, that the fraternities go
to the other extreme socially, and do
not develop the literary side as they
should. Our purpose is to strike a
happy medium. In the first plnce, we
propose, FOR THE S-UvE OF THE
INFLUENCE OF THE NAME, that our
organization shall not be called a fra
ternity, but rather a club, nnd we ex
pect to stenr clear of the Greek letters.
Wo intend to adopt the name or title,
L1TERARY-COCIAL CLUR, to be
known ns the L, S. C; nnd by tho
way, let me say right here, that a num.
ber of the girls of the literary slcieties
nnd some outside, nre making up a
similnr organization among tho girls.
It is our intention not to withdraw
from the societies, if this can be pos-
sible, and in the meantime, before we
announce ourselves, we shall endeav
or, in as quiet a way as possible, to
work up a strong enough sentiment In
the literary societies to strike out tho
clauses, which now exist in the con
stitutions of these organizations, for
bidding the fraternity people from bo
longing to the literary organizations.
We desire to make this a purely
western college movement. We have
never heard of a similar organization,
nnd hope to be the first promulgators
of such a scheme. We think our po
sition will be such that we will be able
to draw members from both the socie
ties nnd fraternities. We will be very
strict in the admission of members to
our club, and get only those whom wo
believe have a future before them, not
only in the University, but in the out
side world of business, POLITICS and
the professions. Our aim is still to
make the social side subordinate to
tho literary, but to make it sufficient
to give the grace and polish necessary
to a thoroughly developed man.
It will be our policy to ihokl weekly
meetings, which for the most part, will
take the character of n seminar for tho
investigation of important questions
of the day and various fields of liter
ature nnd science. But a part of the
meetings will bo givon up iu .i social
Time among the fellows and tho
friends, and, of course, we shall expect
to entertain our co-ed friends occasion
ally. We have already held several
meetings in the interest of our new or
ganization, and have talked matters
over thoroughly. IF WE ADMIT THE
TRUTH, WE MAY AS WELL SAY
RIGHT HERE, THAT WE HAVli
NEVER BEEN IN FULL SYMPATHY
WITH THE POLICY 0 TL.E SOCIE
TIES and we hnve never been really
opposed to a moderate Indulgence in
the social features of the fraternities.
But as you know, our lot having been
cast early in our college life with the
societies, naturally we had to fall in
line and defend their principles
staunchly whether we believed in them
fully or not.
Now, , you know what I hnve
just said about the societies and fra
ternities is true, if you will just ad
mit it; and you have felt yourself the
need of just such a movement as wo
propose. Besides the fellows wo have
in the deal are the cream of the Uni
versity .
Now what we want is to get some
alumni who hnve always -ecu in sym
pathy with us. We hnve thought of
you and Searson among the first, but
we fear Searson is too stubborn and
too muohi inclined always to stick 1j
an opinion he has once argued for. Wo
believe that you have always felt like
us, and that this plan will meet with
your approval. I hope you will write
us at once nnd let us know what you
think of it all.
Now, of course, I believe you will
realize the saoredness of this confi-
I dcnCe, nnd will see the bad light in
which many of us will be put if this
should get out before the proper time.
As you know, Morse is president of the
Union society for the next term;
Smoyer was elected president,
of the senior class as a barb,
and Warner and myself are
on the Junior Annual board. Now, ,
IT WOULD BE PARTICULARLY
HARD ON M13 IF THE COLLEGE PA
TERS SHOULD GET HOLD OF IT
BECAUSE OF MY RELATIONS TO
THE HESPERIAN, AND THE PART I
TOOK IN i- RING VAN VALTN FROM
'THE ANNUAL BOARD FOit A SIM-
1LAR REASON, of which you, no
doubt, have heard.
You will confer a favor on me, there
fore, if you will destroy or return this.
Awniting a favorable answer, I am,
R. C, ROPER.
P. S.
Roper just showed me this letter.
It's O. K. I hope you will fall in with,
; us, but if you can't, for friendship's
j sake KEEP IT 'MUV TILL THE
PROPER TIMID,
J. F. B.