The daily Nebraskan. ([Lincoln, Neb.) 1901-current, September 26, 1975, Page page 3, Image 3

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friday, September 26. 1975
daily nebrsskan
urundi officials
scuss farming
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By Lha Brown
Two visiting agricultural representatives of a , small
African nation exchanged information with Lincoln! tes
about fanning and living in Nebraska, while visiting the
state this week.
They said one of the most interesting activities during
their week-long visit was an informal discussion with a UNL
, African Studies Class Wednesday night.
Venant Vyuzura, 29, and Zacharie Sindayigaya", 44, are
both agricultural information officials for Burundi, a
country the size of Maryland located in east central
Africa. Although both speak severai languages, including
their national languages French and Kirundi, and Swahilli,
neither spoke English. They spoke through an interpreter
provided by the U.S. State Dept.
Enjoyed field trip
Pierre Nys, their interpreter, said they loved talking
with the students and learning more about their attitudes
toward Africa. He said they also enjoyed the field trips to
local farm sites because they learned about modern farm
techniques.
The men also spoke with Nebraska agricultural journa
lists and 'University officials with jobs similar to their own.
Vyuzura is assistant director of agricultural information
under the agricultural and animal husbandry ministry, and
Sindayigaya is an agricultural extension news service
. programmer.
Ninety per cent of Burundi is agriculture, most of which
is subsistancc farming, Vyuzura said. There are several
large government farms, but the majority of the farms ar
five to 10 acres, Sindayigaya said.
The family Js a very tight unit in Burundi, he said, and
as families have sons the land is redivided and the farms
become smaller and smaller, he said. The government is
now trying to convince the youth to move off the farms to
other areas, he said.
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From left: Interpreter Pierre Nys, Burundi agricultural information officials VenanTvyuzurrand""'
Zacharie Sindayigaya. . 1
Burundi, with 3,COO,000 people in 10,379 square miles,
la the most densely populated African country, Nys said.
4 Sindayigaya said he plans "to use several of the
techniques he has seen in Nebraska on government farms in
Burundi. 1
. Killing Insects which affect both the crops and popula
tion is one of the main agriculture problems, he said. DDT
is still one of the most common pesticides used there, he
said. , '
Commenting on what they had seen of the American
way of life during their second week here, they both agreed
they preferred America's more conservative fashions includ
ing longer skirts and pant suits to mini-skirts, which are
now popular there.
The men said they liked Lincoln because it had lots of
green everywhere and reminded them of Africa. The men
leave today for Houston, Tex.
Zech progresses
to a lighter coma
David Zech, the UNL student who fell out of his tenth
floor Abel Hall window, is progressing to a lighter coma but
still is not able to communicate, according to Lincoln
General Hospital Supervisor Pat Mclaughlin.
Zech is not paralyzed but describing his condition is
difficult, according to McLoughlin.
Zech continues in fair condition as reported last week by
Supervisor Lois UUman.
Zech suffered head injuries in the fall Aug. 26, in
addition to' several broken . ribs, a broken pelvis and a
broken wrist.
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SUN. 9
17th &Q
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That's the last data you can enroll in the Student Accident and
Sickness Insurance Plan endorsed by your
university ... a plan that provides
comprehensive hospital-surgical-medical
protection at
rates considerably
below what Mutual
' charges for similar plans
issued on an individual
basis.
Make sure sudden and
unexpected medics)
expenses don't disrupt your
college budget. Contact
John Van Bloom and
Associates today for full
details.
Find out why so many of
your fellow students are
already enrolled in this
fine program.
John Van Bloom and
Associates
1701 South 17th St., Suite 20
Lincoln Phone:476-5902
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Uf Insuranct Affiliates United of Omaha
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