The daily Nebraskan. ([Lincoln, Neb.) 1901-current, July 30, 1974, Page page 10, Image 10

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emphasized in summer class
Minority group problems
with alcoholism will receive
special emphasis at the second
9 t If mWi 0f K
Nebraska School for Alcohol
Studies (NSAS) to be held
August 11-16 at ' Nebraska
Western College in Scottsbhift
NSAS is a week-long school
on alcoholism sponsored
jointly by the State Division
on Alcoholism and the
Nebraska Psychiatric Institute.
"The emphasis on
minorities was almost
accidental," according to Gail
Wheeler, co-director of NSAS.
"Several of our study sections,
speakers, presentations and
entertainment seemed to
independently develop along
those" lines."
The guest speaker will be
Rita Saenz, a Chicano who is
currently a consultant for the
National Institute on Alcohol
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ieorities' alcohol problems
Abuse and Alcoholism
minority and poverty programs
in Los Angeles.
About 20 minority
teen-agers who will attend
NSAS met July 23 for a
culture awareness program.
Indian, Black and Chicano
teen-agers explained their
cultures, heritages and
lifestyles to each other in
preparation for the school. The
minority students were
recruited and led ' by Andy
Malekoff, a VISTA volunteer
at Platte Valley Community
Action Center in Grand Island
and Darryl Eure of the South
Omaha Alcoholism Counseling
Program.
The Mexican-American
Cultural Dance Group from
Scottsbluff will entertain
school participants after the
Thursday evening banquet
A new Halfway House
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section, will offer special
programs on Indians and
Blacks, headed by Tom Dowell
of the Intertribal Alcoholism
Program in Miami, Oklahoma,
and Vemetta Reams, director
of Wise Council House in
Kansas City, Missouri.
NSAS is the first alcohol
school to offer a section on
halfway houses. Halfway
houses provide intermediary
living environments which help
ease recovering alcoholics from
treatment centers into work
and community life.
Ralph Fox will direct the
section. Fox founded Houses
of Hope in Lincoln, the first
halfway houses in Nebraska.
He is also a regional chairman
for the Association of Halfway
House Alcoholism Programs of
America and has been active in
alcoholism programs in Lincoln
and throughout the state.
"All staff, members for this
section presently direct
halfway houses, so they are
well qualified to offer sound
information and special
insights into the problems
involved in operating halfway
houses." Mrs. Wheeler said.
Harvey Swager, the fourth
staff member, is director of the
9bed NU Way House, Inc., of
Minneapolis and will assist with
a program on administration.
The section will also cover
accreditation, funding,
communication,
professionalism, use of
community resources, internal
programs and special programs
such as halfway houses for
women.
Une hour of college credit
may be earned at each session
through the University of
Nebraska-Lincoln Psychology
Department.
"NSAS is open Ip anyone
interested in alcoholism," Mrs.
Wheeler said. "But" the
majority of the students are
usually professionals in the
alcoholism field, counselors,
ministers, teachers, nurses and
relatives of alcoholics."
Applications for the school
will be accepted until August
5. Those interested should
write to the Nebraska School
for Alcohol Studies, University
of Nebraska Extension
Division, 511 Nebraska Hail,
Lincoln, Nebraska 68S03 or
call Gary Schoenrock at
(402-472-2171.
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summer nbrskaii
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Arnolphe, played by Roger Johnson, (left) quarrels with Horace,
played by George Hansen, in a rehearsal of "School for Wives."
'School for wives11
debuts at UN-L
A modern adaptation by
Miles Malleson of Moliere's
play, "The School for Wives",
will be staged by the University
of Nebraska-Lincoln Repertory
Theatre.
The comedy opens Friday,
Aug. 2, at 8 p.m. in Howell
Theatre, 12th and R Sts., and
will alternate in performance
with three other plays: "Little
Mary Sunshine," "Cohan is a
Grand Old Name," and "The
Birthday Party."
The play's director, Hal
Floyd, saidhat although "The
School for Wives" is a classical
comedy that was first per
formed in 1662, Malleson's
adaptation is very contem
porary. "The play will be presented
in a lightly stylized manner,"
Floyd said. "I have especially
tried to emphasize those
aspects of the play that will
appeal to a present-day
audience."
The play is about a middle
aged man who has never
married because he is obsessed
with a horrible fear of being
deceived by a wife. To solve
this problem he has had his
intended bride posted in a
convent from childhood. Shortly
before the wedding, he brings
her to Paris, continuing her
isolation from society by
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keeping her in a town house
guarded by two servants. His
master plan has been to keep
her innocent in body and blank
of mind so that she cannot
possibly deceive him after they
are married. However, her
innocence is his downfall when
a handsome young man enters
the picture.
"The audience knows very
early in the play that Arnolphe
(the older man) is not Roing to
succeed in his plans," Floyd
said. "The humor of the play is
iii watching his plans fail and in
seeing how he outsmarts
himself."
"The School for Wives" is the
play that the Nebraska Reper
tory Theatre will present this
summer, September 3 7, as it
tours communities in the state--for
the fourth consecutive year.
Floyd said that the theatre
group will be playing in Crete,
Broken Bow, and Kearney, and
that his department is still in
the process of selecting the
other towns.
Tickets for Nebraska Reper
tory Theatre productions and a
schedule of this summer's
performances may be obtained
at the Theatre Box Office; 106
Temple Bldg.: l!Jth & R
Streets; Lincoln (68"08), or by
telephoning (402) 472 207:1.
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tuesday, ju!y 30, 1974