The daily Nebraskan. ([Lincoln, Neb.) 1901-current, January 23, 1974, Page page 3, Image 3

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    Chinese dinner
set for Friday
The Chinese Student Assoc.
(CSA) will hold a Chinese New
Year dinner party from 7 to 1 1
p.m. Friday at the University
Lutheran Chapel.
Tickets are available from
2:30 to 4:30 p.m. at the CSA
office in the Nebraska Union.
Japanese visitors examine
farm programs, techniques
doily nebroskon
Editor-in-Chief: Mary Voboril. Copy Desk Chief: Randy Beam.
News Editor: Jane Owens. Associate News Editor: Vince Boucher.
Layout and Sports Editor: Dennis Onnen. Entertainment Editor:
Diane Wanek. Night News Editor: Cheryl Westcott. Chief
Photographer: Gail Folda. News Assistant: Lori Clepper.
Reporters: Wes Albers, Bill Boyd, Lori Demo, Jim Fullerton,
Ellyn Hess, Mark Hoffman, Jan Hoge, Tom Jensen, Michael (O.J.)
Nelson, Susanne Schafer, Mary Shackelton, Lynn Silhasek, Greg
Wees.
Entertainment Writers: Greg Lukow, Bruce Nelson, Meg Greene,
Val McPhersson.
Sports staff: Bob Hill, Steve Taylor, Larry Stunkel.
Columnists: Mary Cannon, Keith Landgren, John O'Shea, Karen
Richardson, Ron Sindelar.
Artists and Photographers: Stewart Nelsen, Tony Ramirez, Mark
Sward.
Copy Desk: Rebecca Brite, Dave Madsen, K. Steinbruegge, Nancy
Stohs, Pamela Ury. Dispatch: Larry Grill.
Circulation: Tom Lundahl, Sue Bruner, Mark Lyon.
Subscriptions: Mary K. Jensen.
Business Manager: Jerri Haussler. Advertising Manager: Jeff
Aden.
Receptionist: Kathy Cook.
The Daily Nebraskan is published by the Publications Committee
on Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday through the autumn
and spring semesters, except on holidays and during vacation.
Copyright 1974, the Daiiy Nebraskan. Material may be reprinted
without permission if attributed to the Daily Nebraskan, excepting
material covered by another copyright.
Second class postage paid at Lincoln, Nebraska.
Address: The Daily Nebraskan, Nebraska Union 34, 14th and R
Sts., Lincoln, Nebr. 68508. Telephone 402-472-2588.
By Jane Hoge
Big farms. Complicated machinery. Those
are the ways American and Japanese agriculture
differ, according to Kusuichi Kida.
Kida, currently living at the Center for
Continuing Education on East Campus, is one
of 57 Japanese taking part in a special 12-week
course in animal science.
The UNL course, which began Jan. 6, is part
of a two-year work-study program that
introduces the Japanese to U.S. farming
techniques.
The self-supporting program is sponsored by
the National 4-H Club Foundation and is set up
through the Japanese Agricultural Training
Service.
Kida's group arrived in the U.S. in June
197Z
The men, all high school graduates, first
took a one-month course in English at Big Bend
Community College in Moses Lake, Wash.
They next worked in orchards in
Washington, Oregon and Idaho, then returned
to Moses Lake for two more weeks of language
training.
For the next year, Kida and other members
of his group worked with swine, beef, dairy or
poultry on farms or ranches in one of eight
agricultural states.
The men now have started the institutional
training part of the program. Classes are taught
at the Center for Continuing Education by.
UNL graduate students and professors, and by
county extension agents.
More than 100 other Japanese are in the
U.S. taking part in the program. They are
studying horticulture and citrus and vegetable
production, but not at UNL.
At the end of March, the trainees will return
to work on the farms on which they previously
worked. In mid-June, they will tour the U.S.
and then most will return to Japan.
Not all the trainees will return to Japan,
according to Clinton Hoover, Nebraska Center
director.
As in the past, he said, some probably will
join the Japanese Peace Corps, continue their
education or become teachers or agricultural
businessmen.
"Several have come back and are studying at
UNL," Hoover said.
Kida said he and many others in his group
plan to farm with their fathers when they
return to Japan.
Kida said he joined the program "to learn
about American agriculture and society and to
see the situation of Japan from the outside."
Kida said some of the trainees would like to
talk to UNL students. Anyone interested
should i all Hoover at the Nebraska Center,
472-2844.
(colendof)
Monday
3:30 p. in. -Students'
International Meditation
Society-Union
4:30 p. m. Student Fees
Allocation Rourd-Union
5:30 p rn . - E n g i n e e r I n g
Toastmaslors-Union
5:30 p.m. Mortar Board-Union
6 p.m. Mux ican-American
Sfudnni. As-.oc. -Union ' "' : s r
6; 30 p.m.-AS UN Senate
meeting Union
7 p.m. Student Volunteer
Services Union
7 p.m. Student Veterans
Assoc. -Union
7 p.m. Inter-Fraternity
Council- Union
7:30 p.m.-Wildlile Club-Union
7:30 p , in , - m a t h
counselor;, Union
7:30 p.m.- Bahai Assoc. -Union
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Wednesday, january 23, 1974
daily nebraskan
page 3