The daily Nebraskan. ([Lincoln, Neb.) 1901-current, January 14, 1974, Page page 12, Image 12

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Lincoln's menu of restaurants
to offer new French entree
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By Val McPherson
Although he has had several jobs in his
lifetime, most of Apollo M. Faison's
occupations have revolved around one basic
theme: providing the finest restaurant food
and service he possibly can.
If Faison's wares are as good as reports
indicate, the University community will have
an opportunity to reap the benefits of his
gastronomic passion. Faison has chosen
Lincoln as the site of his new restaurant, The
French Gourmet, at 227 No. 9th.
Faison got his first taste of food service at
ago 13, when he worked as a bus boy. By the
time he reached 17, he had become a skilled
waiter. Later, after working as a bartender
and waiter in many of the top houses in the
Midwest and on the West Coast, Faison
became a nightclub manager in Omaha.
It was in Omaha that Faison was first
appi cached by a Frenchman who offered
him an opportunity to manage the first
French restaurant in Nebraska. Faison
accepted, and The French Cafe in the Old
Market section of Omaha went into business.
For three years, Faison worked to make
it Nebraska's finest restaurant. Its
outstanding reputation suggests proof of his
success. Rut iie still was not satisfied with his
achievements. He left The French Cafe two
years ago and began making plans for his
own restauiant in Lincoln. The French
Gourmet is the result.
The restaurant is d;s:c;ned to compliment
Faison's philosophy tnat a meal should be an
experience both enjoyable and intimate.
The interior, clsxigned by Joe Luke of
Kansas City, features one main dining area
which could be-, crowded with as few as 50
people.
There also is a cocktail lounge and two
privaio dining areas, one of which is named
the Uay of Naples because of a large mural
displayed there. Lighting has been
engineered so that the most important part
of the meal, the food itself, is highlighted on
every table.
The -staff also is designed to make the
meal a personal experience. The staff will be
small but highly trained. Faison, who will
serve as the maitre d', plans to train
everyone on his staff in the art of French
serving.
Faison said this art is more a school of
thought than a set cf rules. It is learned and
passed on from one person to another. This
art includes such details as temperature of
the wine glass, proper approach to the table
and proper serving sequence.
The food, not the interior design or the
service, is what makes a meal memorable, he
said. To insure that his restaurant is not
forgotten Faiscn has hired what he calls the
finest chef available. The chef, Marhan
Arian, is a native of Belgium.
Arian became a cook at the age of 16 and
has been a chef of executive rank for 30
years. For the last eight years he has been
working in the United States. Arian will
either be involved in the actual preparation
of the food or will oversee every item that
leaves his kitchen. Assisting Arian will be
Charlie Peters, flown in from France after
Faison could find no one in this area who
met his qualifications.
The chef describes the menu as classic in
its offerings and promises that the food will
be freshly prepared every step of the way.
Besides the extensive listings on the regular
menu, each night the chef will offer specials
designed to further enable him to
demonstrate his specialized creativity.
Faison hopes that in the future The French
Gourmet will even be able to make its own
breads and pastries.
The French Gourmet will be accepting
reservations from the general public within a
week or two.
Students who missed the Winterim overseas study
program will have a chance to study in Europe this spring
via the Spring Flight program, May 20 - June 9.
The program is sponsored by the Flights and Study
Tours office and the Overseas Opportunities Center.
Fourteen courses will be offered by 11 UNL departments.
Cost for the courses will be offered by 11 UNL
departments. Cost for the courses will vary from $553 to
$1,004, depending on which course a student takes.
Registration for the program will begin January 21 and
the flights are expected to be full by February 15. Students
interested in the study program can sign-up in Union 204
by paying a $50 deposit and presenting written permission
of the sponsoring professor.
UNL. plans
study flight
to Europe
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fJEXT TO WHOLESALE PPJCES ON
Bedspreads Rugs Yapestries And Mcssiy IMPORTS
12 & Q Gloss Menagerie
1847 0 St. Lincoin
4201 Center St. Omaha
ddily nebrjGkan
rnonday, january 14, 1974