The daily Nebraskan. ([Lincoln, Neb.) 1901-current, December 15, 1971, Page PAGE 16, Image 16

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    Fraternities face financial crisis
Communication is the biggest problem
facing the fraternity system at the University of
Nebraska, according to both the out-going and
newly-elected presidents of the Inter-Fraternity
Council (IFC).
Dennis Confer, who is completing his term
.as IFC president, and Howard Epstein, newly
elected president, agree that better
communication must exist between fraternity
houses, IFC, the University and students.
"The (fraternity) system has been falling
behind the University," Confer said. He urged
further efforts to keep it "more in tune" with
the rest of the University.
The past year's IFC president urged an
"increased awareness and participation" by his
fellow fraternity members.
Epstein agreed, noting that a committee was
recently formed to study possible racial
discrimination in fraternities. He said he hoped
a "more critical and deliberate look" could now
be taken at the question.
Both Confer and Epstein see little chance
that fraternity life will disappear from UNL.
"Naturally the system has been in some ups
and downs," Confer said. He pointed to the
large financial investments as a reason
fraternities would exist for a considerable
length of time.
Epstein felt one reason it appears fraternities
are disappearing is because the "number of
students has increased while fraternity houses
have not."
IFC is investigating the possibility of a
cooperative buying system for fraternity
houses. According to Epstein a "better price"
would be realized on food and supplies if all
houses combined their purchases.
Epstein hoped the next year would see an
"expanded rush program." The goal would be a
"rush-week-free rush."
High school seniors may be invited to visit
fraternities the spring before they graduate if a
prdposed change in IFC regulations is made.
"Freshmen often find rush week too
formal," Epstein said. He though spring visits
would permit students to get acquainted with
the campus rather than be forced to make a
decision on fraternity membership during rush
week.
Faculty Senate hears
report on discrimination
The UNL faculty senate
received a lengthy
- statistics-filled report from the
Women's Rights Committee at
their meeting in Love Library
Auditorium Tuesday
afternoon.
The report concluded that
by statistics, women at UNL
"suffer wage and status
inequities in almost every
classification possible and on
every level of education and
experience." The study
indicated that although 37 per
cent of UNL students are
women, no more than 17 per
cent of the faculty is female.
Wallace M . Rudolph,
professor of law, pointed out
that while in Law School there
are no female professors,
applicants by women
professors to the Law School
are almost non-existent.
"The last one we offered a
job to a couple of years ago
turned us down . We haven't
seen any applicants since,"
Rudolph stated.
The law professor said the
evidence in the report proved
nothing, and called for removal
of conclusions about sex
discrimination before he would
accept it.
The senate voted to
postpone further discussion on
the recently-circulated report
until the next meeting when all
members will have had time to
read it.
NFU NEBRASKA FREE THEATRE
PRESENTS:
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
DIRECTED BY PAUL BAKER
CONTEMPORARY VERSION WITH
MUSIC AND INSIGHT LIGHTS
SPONSORED by KOSMET KLUB
Dec. 16, 17 AT 7:00 pm
in the
Union Centennial Room
ALSO: Oedipus The King
Lab Play at 8:30
in the
Union Ballroom
REE!
PAGE 16
THE DAILY NEBRASKAN
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 1971