The daily Nebraskan. ([Lincoln, Neb.) 1901-current, February 23, 1971, Page PAGE 3, Image 3

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    Horowitz . . . We're in the
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13
Sociologist says conciliation
causes quieter campus mood
by BART BECKER
Staff Writer
America is in a "period of
conciliation," which may be
one reason for the quieter
mood on campuses, says a
prominent sociologist.
"But one should not accept
the mood of quiescence as
permanent," he added.
Irving Horowitz, chairman
of the sociology department of
Livingston College, a part of
Rutgers University, told a
gathering of graduate students
Friday: "I don't think it's as
much a change in students as it
is a change in strategy by the
administration."
For instance, "The timing
of the Laos venture comes at
the same time as the
president's statement about the
draft stoppage, he pointed out.
"And somebody in the
Pentagon realized that an air
war won't generate the same
response as a cround war."
HOROWITZ SPOKE of the
change in attitude toward
student organizations:
"Student organizations mean
more now. There have been
changes in response to student
activism. If you don't like
what's going on you call it
co-optation, if you like it you
call it adaptation"
The editor of Transaction, a
sociology magazine, noted that
"tolerance for alienation is
much higher in America today.
Alienation is a function of
wealth."
He explained the tolerance
for alienation may "only
legitimize privation. It doesn't
necessarily lead to revolution."
"We're in the revolution
now," Horowitz said. "It's
been partially successful,
partially abortive, partially a
failure.
"This isn't a party-it's a
movement. It's a
counter-culture, it's not going
to be wiped out."
"THE REVOLUTION
begins when you wake up in
the morning," Horowitz told
the students. "People were
smoking pot 40 years ago but
now they do it publicly as a
political act.
Life styles in America have
always been relatively fluid, he
continued, and now certain
accepted modes of living are
being broken down.
Horowitz, who has been
described as the intellectual
father of the radical
movement, called attention to
the influence the
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counter-culture has had on
court decisions and on the
structure of life in prison.
Due to the number of
political activists being jailed
the prisons have become
political organizing points,
according to Horowitz.
"THERE'S MORE GOOD
politics in prisons than in the
universities." he said
Speaking of the effect the
radical movement has had on
the courts, Horowitz said,
"You can regulate the form of
behavior, you cannot regulate
the content of behavior.
"People are just not going
to abide by statutory
constraints. We have a zillion
laws against marijuana but they
do not affect the smoking of
marijuana."
The noted author drew a
laugh from the graduate
students when he quoted the
late comedian, Lenny Bruce,
"The pot laws will eventually
be repealed because the law
students are turning on."
However, Horowitz warned,
the courts are always setting
precedents on both sides.
There are good laws and bad
laws that are ignored, he said.
A RESULT of the
revolution that is often
overlooked, he said, is that the
counter-culture may become a
counter-establishment with a
structure of its own.
In answer to a student's
question about the direction
sociology is moving Horowitz
said, "We've gotten it out of
the laboratory. We've made the
discipline open to a lot of
people and that's good.
Horowitz noted the merging
of sociology with politics as a
"very ongoing phenomena. I,
personally, am conservative on
some points, more radical on
others. Above all my position
is a sociological one."
"SOCIOLOGY WENT on
for years in a political vacuum.
We have highly politicized
views of every area of
sociology," Horowitz said,
"Political science and sociology
are becoming one discipline."
Later Friday afternoon
Horowitz addressed a gathering
in the University High
auditorium on the problems
faced by developing nations.
The heart of the problem,
he said, is "nation is the pivot
point" of people's outlook on
the world. National boundaries
are usually set by former
colonial powers and they may
be less important than tribal or
family ties in development.
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"We are approaching a point
in time," Horowitz said,
"where development, as such,
is not the important point. We
must consider the relationship
of development to revolution
on the one hand and the
relationship of devlopment to
peace on the other hand."
He described the problem
for Americans as one of trying
to relate to the rest of the
world rather than looking at
the problems of development
as an overseas export.
In answer to a question
from the audience Horowitz
revealed that 9 of the 10
fastest developing countries in
, the world are "military
dictatorships of the worst overt
kind."
HE CITED BRAZIL as a
nation where "the military is
doing well and development is
better than ever. I wish it
wasn't so, but when you're
talking about development
you're not necessarily talking
about the good moral things of
life."
Horowitz also discounted
the notion of overpopulation
as a detriment to development.
While it is a problem in some
countries, notably India, he
said underpopulation presents
a problem of equal magnitude
in other developing
nations.
Tuesday is last
day for exchange
Tuesday is the deadline for
picking up money or books left
from the Student Book
Exchange, according to Roy
Baldwin, one of the organizers
of the exchange.
Students should go to the
Activities Office on the third
floor of the Union for their
money or books.
Degree deadline
will be March 1
All students who expect to
receive bachelors degrees,
advanced degrees, two-year or
six-year certificates at the close
of the second semester must
apply by March 1, 1971, if
they have not yet done so.
Applications should be
made at the Registrar's Office,
Room 208 Window 3,
Administration Building,
between 8 and 5, Monday
through Friday.
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TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1971
THE DAILY NEBRASKAN
PAGE 3