The daily Nebraskan. ([Lincoln, Neb.) 1901-current, February 17, 1971, Image 1

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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1971
LINCOLN, NEBRASKA
ARCHIVCO
VOL. 94 NO. 64
Austerity budget causes
cuts in services, faculty
hv GARY SEACREST w
by GARY SEACREST
Staff Writer
For the past 20 years the
annual East Campus
Hospitality Day program has
offered extension agents, home
ec teachers and high school
students across the state an
opportunity to visit the
University. But last week, Gov.
J. J. Exon's budget
recommendations for the
University forced the
cancellation of Hospitality Day
and an accompanying fashion
show.
The money intended for
Hospitality Day will be used to
purchase supplies. And with
the proposed enrollment freeze
for the Lincoln campuses,
officials thought it was
desirable to de-emphasize
recruitment-type projects.
THE CANCELLATION of
Hospitality Day is one example
of the University's efforts to
reduce costs in the event
Exon's budget
recommendations are adopted
by the Unicameral.
Exon recommended a $2.7
million cut in state funds for
the Lincoln campuses for
1971-72.
Howard R. Neville,
vice-chancellor for business and
finance, recently predicted
how a cutback in funds will
affect students:
"There will be fewer small
classes and some courses will
be completely dropped from
the curriculum. In addition,
there will be heavier teaching
loads. Students will also have
to pay for some services that
are now free."
NEVILLE ADDED that
there will also be cutbacks in
the University's public service
programs, if Exon's budget
recommendations are adopted
by the Unicameral.
"I guess there might be
fewer faculty next year," he
remarked. Due to the
Governor's budget
recommendations, the Board
of Regents earlier this month
ordered a halt to filling
vacancies on the Lincoln
campuses without advanced
authorization.
The University is now in the
process of developing a list of
programs to be cut back or
eliminated in an effort to fit
Exons recommendations,
according to Neville. He noted
the Lincoln campuses will have
to find or trim from current
activities more than $3 million
if the Unicameral approves
Exon's budget proposals.
"YOU HAVE TO CUT A
lot to save more than than $3
million," Neville said. "We
should develop quality in
programs that we continue and
that are meaningful to the state
of Nebraska."
The University is also
re-studying the Regents'
proposed tuition hike for the
1 971-72 school year.
Chancellor D. B. Varner said
recently "it would seem unfair
to ask the students and the
parents to bear an increasing
share of the cost of their
education."
Neville said any reduction in
the proposed tuition rates
would create additional budget
problems since Exon used the
tuition increases as a
replacement for increased state
aid for University operation in
1971-72.
THE REGENTS at their
February meeting advised that
the admission program for the
Lincoln campuses should be
geared to accomodate a
no-growth position for at least
the coming year due to Exon's
budget proposals.
The Regents are expected to
decide on the machinery of a
selective admission program at
their March meeting. In the
past the University has
accepted any graduate of an
accredited Nebraska high
school.
Approval of two-thirds of
the Unicameral will be
necessary for the University to
receive more money than Exon
has proposed.
Neville said the University
will try to persuade Exon to
recommend an amended
budget providing for increased
state aid for the University.
Neville believes the Governor
will change his budget
recommendations for the
University if additional state
revenue can be found.
ADMITTING THAT he was
an optimist, Neville said the
University's chances of
receiving more state aid are
"better than 50-50."
"The University will receive
increased funds if we present
our case well and if the people
in the Legislature believe in the
University," he added.
However, if the Unicameral
approves Exon's budget
recommendations for the
University, it will be the first
time since the 1 930's that state
aid to the University has been
cut.
If Exon's budget
recommendations for the
University are approved, the
state could add another
distinction to its record. In the
past decade, according to
University officials, only three
state universities in the nation
have received cutbacks in state
aid.
Varner forms committee to study
human sexuality curriculum needs
In response to the findings of a faculty
committee. Chancellor D. B. Varner has
decided to form an intercampus committee
"to consider curricula r needs designed to
deal with the expanded subject of human
sexuality."
Varner's announcement came after the
Faculty Steering Committee on Human
Sexuality had recommended that the
controversial course, "Pro Seminar in
llomophilc Studies." not be offered next
fall.
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR of
psychology James K. Cole, who was a
member of (he steering committee and
coordinator of the class, said a curriculum
dealing with the total topic of human
Sexuality should replace the original
homophile course.
Cole emphasized thai the homophile
course was "excellent" and neither
inappropriate nor irrevelant. But the
committee wanted a "broader concern" with
the issues of sexuality, he explained,
including homosexuality.
He staled that the committee's
suggestions were an effort to "make a good
thing belter".
ACCORDING TO COLE this change
would probably include a shift to a
behavioral and social science orientation. Ik
said this would be particularity useful for
pre-professional students and teachers.
Cole denied that Sen. Terry Carpenter's
repeated attacks on the homophile course
had influenced the committee's decision.
He claimed the State Senator had made
investigation "very difficult" because he had
politicized I he issue
HOWEVER, COLE NOTED that
recommendations were based on "academic
and educational needs" rather han politics.
Varner said the cancellation was the
result of action initiated several months ago
and had nothing to do with the budget
battle between the University and the
Legislature.
Cole commended Varner and President
Joseph Soshnik for backing the steering
committee's efforts.
VARNER'S STATEMENT SAID the new
committee would be composed of
representatives from the University
campuses at Lincoln. Omaha, and the
Medical Center. It further stated that the
committee's recommendations should be
discussed with Varner and the Regents.
Cole concurred with the statement and
said the administration has been "extremely
cooperative".
Cole added hat the decision of the
steering committee, which included the
principal faculty members teaching the
homophile course, was unanimous.
SKI J
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Neville . . . optimistic
Disruption bill moves
to Legislature floor
by JIM PEDERSEN
Staff Writer
A considerably amended
student-faculty disruptions bill
was advanced to general file by
the Unicameral's Educational
Committee Tuesday.
Sen. C. W. Holmquist's LB
445. which provides for the
dismissal of any faculty
member and expulsion of any
student engaging in
"disruptive" activities received
favorable comment from
Stephen L. Rozman and
Regents' attorney Flavel
Wright in hearincs Monday.
THE COMMITTEE, which
voted 8-0 to advance the
legislation, adopted almost all
of Wright's suggested
amendments which included
transferring responsibility for
holding hearings from the
governing body at NU. the
Board of Regents of the
institution to a committee
designated by that body. No
mention was made as to the
composition of the committee.
Wright also convinced the
committee to add to the bill a
section which reads: "The term
'dismissal does not include
failure to renew a probationary
appointment of any faculty
member or administrative staff
member."
THUS. UNTENU RED
faculty members. Such as
Rozman. whose contracts are
not renewed remain essentially
outside the protective
procedure established by the
bill.
The committee, however,
rejected Wright's proposal to
make private hearings for those
charged with disruption. The
bill still provides for public
hearing before any faculty
member can be dismissed or
student expelled.
Under Nebraska public
hearing statutes, however, the
committee holding the hearing
can move into "executive or
closed session" from which
the public is barred and
essential details can be
discussed in private.
IN OTHER ACTION The
Education Committee
advanced LB 446. sponsored
by Senators Ernie Chambers of
Omaha and Fern Hubbard
Orme of Lincoln, which
prohibits teachers from
inflicting corporal physical
punishment in elementary and
secondary schools. The bill was
approved by a 7-1 vote.
The committee added an
Orme amendment which
provides for the Teachers
Professional Practices
Commission to investigate
charges of corporal punishment
and recommend to the local
school board whether the
license of the teacher involved
should be revoked.
The committee also added a
provision which would allow
teachers to use physical force
in protection of their persons
or property.
IN HEARING TESTIMONY
Monday, several teachers from
Horace Mann Junior High
School in Omaha revealed that
school administrators there use
paddles to punish students.
One Omaha parent, Dean
Kelley, showed the committee
a wooden paddle he said was
used on his son who he said is a
victim of cerebral palsy.