The daily Nebraskan. ([Lincoln, Neb.) 1901-current, November 13, 1970, Page PAGE 7, Image 7

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    Tim
Moof
Blues
Review
by MARIA JANNECK
Departzaeat f EngBsh
It's "circles of sound" . . .
it's "round joy" . . . it's "each
titer's rhythms" . . . it's
cavelike drugstore doorways"
... it's "oranges" and "sticky
Sers" yielding to a "rouga
slow1' tune . . . it's a
"pipe's gummed stem" and
"aroma fattened air" . . . it's
"laughter" . . . it's "waxed
quarter-planked cedar" and "a
book that grows out of the
tabletop" . . . "field daisies"
and "a twisted and gnarled
pine root" ... Tin Roof Blaes,
Vol. 1, no. 2 . . . Editor Murrav
Martz has again assembled
nine poems in what is the finest
and fastest selling literary
magazine U of N has seen.
A brown-tone of Sarah and
Blanche McGinley frontices the
publication. Sallie Nixon's
"Haiku" introduces the collec
tion by encircling the full round
Joy of children and snow.
The romantic illusion of a
young man pleasing his
Schererezade on a wedding
anniversary gives way to
tawdry dreams of cheap sex
books in dingy drugstore
doorways in Ted Kooser's
"Anniversary." Upon awaken
ing and finding the dream real,
the speaker is reluctant to
return home and longs for his
former innocence. Mr. Kooser's
poem treats a complex ex
perience with delicacy and
perspicacity.
The reader of Susan Martz's
nostalgic "Early Oranges"
shares her delight of "this first
cold Thursday" through tactile
and succulent images. Though
Barry McDonald's poem, "up
wishbone alley," doesn't hang
together, it is imagistically
strong and, at points,
rhythimcally satisfying.
Her laughter, once Joyful,
now ellusive, shall become the
"terrible beasts" of her future
in Greg Kuzma's poem, which
softly traces the transition
from jny to cynisicsm.
Jim Weaver's "The Scow" is
a pleasant poem about sailing,
but the poetry is a little jarring
since the sound sequence of the
first two lines is awkward. The
image of the last two lines,
however, is exquisite since the
scow verges on becoming the
wind save that "the parchment
like sound of the luff" forces it
to retain its unique identity.
"The Sleep Album," con
ceptually and imagistically, is
like a jigsaw puzzle in which all
the locks and keys are wrong.
The tone of Sallie Nixon's
"Field Daisies" is that of a
mother SDeakinff to a child
about the heresy of picking
e Gmaraill EEsctec's tern
for 3(D) years.
WBiot aims tkzy gpSimg
to sfarft MMonig deader
leleuDgDimes?
Not many people know that
General Electric started building a jet
engine in 1941. America's first jet
engine.
That jet produced only 1200
pounds of thrust
Our newest jet, for the DC-10,
produces around 50,000 pounds
of thrust.
In the early days of jet aviation,
the important thing was thrust
But suddenly our skies are filled
with jets. And, suddenly, jet pollution
is a major problem.
General Electric tackled it head
on when building the DC-10 engines.
And we accomplished two things.
When you see the DC-10 take
to the air, you'll see no black marks
against the sky. Because the engines
make virtually no smoke.
Of course, there's more to jet
exhaust than just smoke. Our goal is
someday to make jets run totally clean.
Another problem with jets is
noise. If you've ever lived anywhere
near an airport, we don't have to
tell you that
General Electric has been
working on noise, too.
GE was chosen by the federal
government to help solve this
problem for the aviation industry. At
present, we know of no way a
powerful turbofan engine can be
made noiseless. But we've made
progress in that direction.
The DC-10 ergines, for instance,
are quieter than any jet engines on
the passenger planes of the Sixties.
Quieter, even though they're more
than three times as powerful.
We have more work to do
before we'll satisfy all the people
concerned about jet pollution,
ourselves included. But because
we've been working at it since the
mid-Fifties, before It was widely
recognized as much of a problem.
GENERAL ELECTRIC
we've already crossed some
important hurdles.
Why are we running this ad?
We're running this ad, and
others like it, to tell you the things
General Electric is doing to solve
the problems of man and his
environment today.
The problems concern us
because they concern you. We're a
business and you are potential
customers and employees.
But there's another, more
Important reason. These problems
will affect the future of this country
and this planet We have a stake In
that future. As businessmen. And,
simply, as people.
We invite your comments.
Please write to General Electric,
570 Lex?: igton Ave., New York, N.Y.
10022.
wild flowers but the language is
deceptive for the subject of the
poem is the artist's attempt to
mirror nature. G. Lynn
Nelson's "The Gift" captures
the essence of the true gift of
fered by a demure Tyro, who in
this case is somewhat sen
timental. Though Tin Roof Blues may
seem to be a "blue box" wrap
ped in "pink ribbon," it is a
"pine root twisted and gnarled
from struggling with rocks,'
"a silent slant of sunlight;" Tin
Roof Blues is "the heart of
things."
Medical College
interviews soon
The Admissions Committee
of the University of Nebraska
College of Medicine will have
representatives in Lincoln on
three different days this year.
Interviews will be from 10 a.m.
to S p.m. Nov. 20, 1 p.m. to t
p.m. Dec. 3, and 1 p.m. to 5
p.m. Dec. 4.
All applicants for admission
to the U N College of Medicine
In the fall of 1971 are expected
to have interviews with
members of this committee.
Eash applicant should sign up
for an appointment on the
premedical bulletin board near
the north door of Bessey Hall.
Got a problem?
University Help Line
472-3311 Or 3312
Nebraskan
Want Ads
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PAGE 8
THE NEBRASKAN
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 1970