The daily Nebraskan. ([Lincoln, Neb.) 1901-current, October 30, 1969, Page PAGE 4, Image 4

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    THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1969
PAGE 4
THE DAILY NEBRASKAN
End to pot penalties pushed
By Floyd Norris
College Press Service
Los Angeles A
Senate , sub-committee has
been told here that mari
juana is in many ways a
better drug to take than
alcohol and that Operation
Intercept, i f successful,
would merely drive more
people to dangerous drugs
such as amphetamines.
A series of witnesses testi
fying before the subcommit
tee on alcoholism and
larcotics. chaired by Senator
Harold Hughes (D-Iowa),
;cld the committee that
penalties for drug usage
should be ended. These in
cluded Dr. Joel Fort, a Ber
keley professor and former
consultant of drug abuse to
the World Health Organiza
tion; Dr. Roger Smith,
director of the Amphetamine
Research Project at the
University of C a 1 i f o r n i a
Medical Center in San Fran
cisco; Dr. David Smith
founder of the Haight
Ashbury Free Medical
Clinic; and Dr. William
McGlothlin of the UCLA
Department of Psychology.
Fort told the subcommittee
that it is "totally immoral
and hypocritical to express
concern about marijuana
smoking without worrying
also about other kinds oi
smoking." Tobacco, he said,
is clearly as dangerous a
marijuana.
Under questioning about
possible harmful effects of
various drugs, Fort told the
committee of one drug that
"accounts for thousands of
deaths every year, that,
despite decades of use, still
works on the brain in ways
we do not understand, and
that has caused not only
chromosomal damage but
actual birth defects." The
drug is aspirin.
McGlothlin told of a study
of middle class whites who
had been initiated to mari
juana some twenty years
ago. All had used it for
several years, and some
are still smoking it
regularly. The study found
that it was used as a
substitute for alcohol. Those
who had overused marijuana '
had also overused alcohol at
a different period of their li
ves and would probably do so
again if they were to stop
using marijuana. "Of the two
drugs," he said, "alcohol is
probably the more disruptive
when used to excess."
Roger Smith, who has set
up a clinic in San Francisco,
told the committee that, "As
a result of this (past sum
mer's) marijuana drought,
many users are turning to
other drugs." If Operation
Intercept is successful, this
pattern will increase, he
said. San Francisco dopers
are still getting large quan
tities of hash from North
Africa and grass from such
midwestern states as Iowa
and Kansas, but prices are
up for marijuana, Smith
said.
Hughes agreed with the
witnesses that drug laws
relating to users are overly
punitive. "Excessively
severe, almost sadistic
levels of punishment .to not
deter a young generation
determined to turn on,"
Hughes told the committee.
Tri-U organizes volunteers
for tutoring Indian students
The Tri-University Project
is organizing voluntary
tutorial projects in Lincoln,
Omaha and on the Win
nebago Indian Reservation to
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DANCE TO THE 0AK0AIE TWYNE
HALLOWEEN PARTY
FM. PARTY LAND
OCT. 31 NE ( Wov.rly
COSTUMES
YOB
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The Hutchinson Bros.
PLAYING
ROCK
FROM 9:00-12:00
FRIDAY NIGHT
ON
MAIN FLOOR
NO COVER
rT"ir iiiM
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Kosmet Klub Fall
Reyus Saturday Evening
PERSHING AITUTORIUM t P.M. NOVEMBER I, m
combat the rising dropout
Tates among minority
groups.
The project is strictly
voluntary with each of the 50
tutors paying his own
transportation expenses, on
his own time and deciding
what subjects to tutor.
Plans are being made with
the Indian center in Lincoln
and the Winnebago
Reservation for groups of
two or three young Indian
students to meet one or two
nights a week with a tutor.
The volunteers w ill shortly
begin orientation sessions
conducted by Indians to let
prospective tutors know what
problems they will face.
Jim Kohler, one of group's
organizers, explained why
there is a 50 per cent dropout
rate among Indian students
between grade school and
junior high.
"During the first years of
school the children are iu
t e 1 1 i g e n t , active and
creative," he said. "Then
during the filth and sixth
grades they see only a
reservation existence ahead,
and they lose tho:r interest
and desire," he said.
The Tri-University Project
will also arrange to "send
tutors to the Sunside "store
front" school in Omaha's
Near North Side. College
students will assemble one
night each week with disad
vantaged youth and dropouts.
"These tutors will be fac
ing students with problems
much more intense than
those of middle class
students," Kohler added.
Folk group plays
at club meeting
The International Club of
the University of Nebraska
will present a group of pop
folk singers in their Fall Get
together at the Wesley
Foundation. 640 X. 16th, on
Friday. October 31, at 8 p.m.
Refreshments will be served
and admission is free.
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l'lowvrs an'
a grvut
way to
say tlutnk you.
son
127 South 13th
Floral
432-7(02
Jf HAIRCUT y
X,, BARBER SHOP
m& isfcv mm 3ft otai
APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE. SHINES TOOl
135N.13TH ST. 477-9555
Tkfcfto mi Sri Cnim m FrnUng fcm OHitt-'l.TS
THE
SIMMON'S
JEWEL
GALLERY
ft
ring tfcswn
"Beauty In
tbi leugh"
CUSTOMCD DKIGN5, WITH YOU IN MIND!
DIAMONDS - WATCHES - PEARLS - EARRINGS - CPALS -BRACELETS
- JADE
US' N. 13 St. VAKSITY THIATHI IUO.0IM IINCMN, NISI.
Thursday, Oct. 30
Nebraska Union
12:30 p.m.
Nebr. Union Board Luncheon
Placement
1:30 p.m.
ETV Staff Meeting
Discussion Group 6 Student
Affairs
3 p.m.
Free University Personal
Development Lab
3:30 p.m.
Hyde Park
4 p.m.
Builders Culture
4:30 p.m.
YWCA Head Start
6 p.m.
Teachers College Faculty
Dinner
ALT Exec.
Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia
Phi Gamma Delta
6:30 p.m.
ALT Board
Block & Bridle Interviews
Panhellenic
Christian Science Org.
7 p.m. J
Phi Sigma Loga !
Kappa Alpha Psi j
Quiz Bowl I
French Club
YWCA Cultural Crafts
ASUX Human Rights
Quiz Bowl Isolation
7:30 p.m.
Math Counselors
8:00 p.m.
A S. U.N. Festival of Life
9 p.m.
Comenius Club
AS UN will meet twice
a term on Ag campus
Continued from page 1
Senator Lynn Holden said
that there are many people
on East Campus who have
expressed interest in what
ASUN is doing and question
ed why it does not meet
(here. Prier pointed out that
East Campus participation in
ASUN elections has been
better than city campus
participation on the whole.
In further business, Gless
was elected as Senate
member of the ASUN elec
torial Commission.
Four candidates were
presented for the vacant
senate seat in the College of
Engineering and Architec
ture. They were Tom Hen
dricks, Stan Peters, Tom
Piper, and Bob Yunag. Piper
was elected.
In an informal session
after the meeting, Union and
Student Affairs officials were
questioned about their
operations.
Student Activities Director
Ron Eaglin answered
senators questions about the
investment of money held by
his office. He explained that
interest from this money is
turned back into the general
student activities fund.
The money made from in
terest replaces money that
would otherwise be taken
from student fees, he said
This allows student fees
money to be used in other
ways.
Buddist to speak Fridi
av
Dr. Masayasu Saaanaga, a
renowned figure of the Bud
dhist world, will speak in the
Nebraska Union Friday.
His appearance is
sponsored by the Philosophy
Department in cooperation
with a local Buddhist group,
Nichiren S h o s h u of
America. Sadanaga will present the
philosophy of Nichiren
Daimoku, allegedly revealing
how any individual can find
true happiness.
A.
Masayasu Sadanaga
Paperback Sob
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