The daily Nebraskan. ([Lincoln, Neb.) 1901-current, February 07, 1969, Page PAGE 4, Image 4

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    PAGE 4
THE DAILY NEBRASKAN
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1969
Planning begins for next year . . .
1969 World In Revolution9 cancelled
nioii recreational facilities
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pave Wide range Ot sports due to unfavorable speaker responses
by Mark Gordon
Sports Editor
"No one can mistake the Nebraska
Union's recreational facilities for a
Madison Square Garden sports com
plex, but the Lincoln building has a
wide range of activities for the sports
minded student.
With 10 bowling lanes, 12 billiards
tables and several card tables, the
Union's basement recreational area
provides considerable variety at a
reasonable cost, according to Steve
Sandelin, operations manager. He
added that despite increased student
Interest," the area often stands
desolate.
"I WOULD like to see more students
involved with this area," he said. "We
have a facility at reasonable prices
and it should be used. When it's not
being used it's being wasted."
He said bowling has attracted the
largest following among students with
four student leagues operating as well
as one University secretary's league
and a iaculty loop. He added that
the lanes are fully recognized and
certified by the American Bowling
Congress.
Calling the Union alley the toughest
in Lincoln, Sandelin said the lanes
are open on weekends from 3:30 to
12:30 a.m. Fridays, from 9 a.m. to
12:30 a.m. Saturdays and from 2 to
10:30 p.m. Sundays. Special rates of
$1 for three lines are charged all day
Sunday and from 8 to 4 p.m.
Saturdays.
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PHOTO BY WXE KAYHAN
Aiming for a strike on the Nebraska Union bowling lanes, a Uni
versity student shoots on the resurfaced lanes, one of three areas
in the Union games room.
tlM'5 GREAT COUNTRY SHOW
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"The best times to get a lane are
Tuesday and Thursday afternoons,"
he explained.
The billiard tables, on the other
hand, lack tournament players, but
the operations chief is willing to
organize a tourney if students want
one.
He urged persons interested in
participating in an All-University
billiards meet to leave their names
at the games desk for the tourney
which would be held in early March
if interest warrants it
He said the pool room with recently
balanced and recovered tables, is
slowly gaining popularity since it is
more accessible with the basement
construction finished.
Sandelin said cues and balls may
be obtained at the games room in
exchange for a University identifica
tion. But he added that high school
guests are permitted with University
students.
Oral probes made faster
with electronic medicine
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Electronic medicine has arrived
and the old stand-toy thermometer is
out of date.
The University Health Center Clinic
is now exclusively using an electronic
thermometer, according to Luanda
Schievelbein, director of nurses.
With the new thermometer temp
eratures can be taken in 5 to 12 sec
onds as opposed to three minutes or
longer by the old method. This saves
time for both patient and nurse, she
saad.
The electric thermometer is also
Read
Nebraska
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more sanitary than a conventional
one, she continued. The oral probe is
cased in a sterile plastic covering
before each use.
"The thermometer will more than
pay for itself," she said. Its cost was
$100, but it replaces all the easily
breakable standard thermometers.
Patients and personnel of the Center
are happy with the new equipment,
she said. The electric thermometer
is now used only in the clinic, but
a second one has been ordered and
will soon be in use on the hospital
floor.
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ASUN has officially announced the
demise of the 1968 World In Revolu
tion conference.
Conference Chairman Ron Alex
ander said Thursday that due to "no
luck and unfavorable responses" from
prospective speakers, the conference
planners wiH begin work on the 1970
program instead of making any last
ditch efforts to revive this year's.
4
"SINCE WE only started to attract
speakers last fall, we were forced to
contract lesser known people," Alex
ander said. "We were working for
speakers who would have taken more
publicity than usual."
Nebraska Union Program Council
President Dave Buntain said he was
"very disappointed" that efforts to
plan and execute the conference fail
ed. "A conference like World In
Revolution, planned by and oriented
toward students, would be a valuable
addition to University programming,"
Buntain said.
"THE PLANNERS for this year
failed to realize the magnitude of
problems in attracting national talent
and coordinating the agenda," he
said.
Buntain suggested that provisions
for such a conference should be made
in the University budget
"The University should recognize
the potential use for such convoca
tions," he said. "I guess they don't,
so the student organizations must do
so."
THIS YEAR funds for the con
ference were to come from ASUN and
the Union Program Council, while the
planning was done mainly by Alex
ander's committee with help from the
Union Talks and Topics Committee,
headed by Carol Madson. .
Both Alexander and Buntain ad
vocated that for the next conference,
all planning be consolidated mainly
under one organization.
"Union has established the Forums
Committee this semester to provide
a vehicle for conferences like this,"
Buntain said. "We hope to sponsor
one conference a year plus inter
disciplinary programs of immediate
interest."
THE THREE conference speakers
Alexander tried to obtain for this
semester were Kenneth Boulding,
University of Colorado, who is active
in Vietnam resistance movements;
Charles O. Hamilton, co-author of
"Black Power" with Stokely Car
michael; and Hannah Arendt, political
philosopher and writer on revolutions
and totalitarianism. He received
negative replies from them this
week.
"Many other campuses sponsor an
nual conferences on issues whose im
pact is aimed at students," Buntain
said.
He cited Notre Dame, where a pro
gram on pornography featuring Hugh
Hefner was held.
"EYEBROWS WENT up, but the
transcripts from discussions were sold
to the University of Wisconsin," he
said. "The conference had academic
value and was of interest to
students."
Buntain said that topics "outside
particular departments" would be of
greatest interest.
He named dissent, political par
ticipation and race relations as
"interdisciplinary" topics which
would bring speakers that individual
departments "could not have access
to."
"WORLD IN Revolution could not
be a total student production," Bun
tain said. "The planning committee
would solicit advice of the academic
community and administration."
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