The daily Nebraskan. ([Lincoln, Neb.) 1901-current, August 13, 1968, Page Page 6, Image 6

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    Page 6
Summer Nebraskan
Tuesday, August 13, 1963
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ETV Looks at Politics
Through Wallace's Eyes-
Memorial Stadium, now in silent vi gil, awaits the opening of football frenzy.
ARE YOU READY?
Football Is Just 32
Days
Convince yourself that there
are onlv 32 days until the first
Nebraska football game and
it might be easier to finish
this article.
Big Red meets the Wyom
ing Cowboys in Lincoln on
Sept. 14, opening another
season of utter frenzy in the
state. Even Nixon might take
a backseat to barbershop talk
in '68 if the Cornhuskers have
a winner develop by
November.
And that is the big question
of the year will Nebraska
rebound after taking fifth
place in the Big Eight, drop
ping four crucial conference
games?
The answer lies in the Big
Eight itself. The conference
has balanced itself to that
point where there actually are
no real surprises anymore
any team on any day can win.
But that doesn't answer
many questions about the Big
Red. Gone are names like
Wayne Meylan, Ben Gregory,
Jerry Patton, Dennis Mor
rison, Dennis Richnafsky, : terman. heads an impressive
Barry Alvarez, Marv Mueller
. . . all familiar to Nebraska
football buffs. Meylan is one
of two Nebraskans named
twice to All America lists.
Many of the rest were in
cluded on All Big Eight lists.
in snort, a graduation gap
exists for the Big Red in '68.
But there is evidence to
suggest that coach Bob
Devaney has the manpower
to bridge that gap. Twenty
seven lettermen will return
17 offensive, . 10 defensive.
Leading the parade is Frank
Patrick, a junior from Derry,
ra., wno recovered trom in
juries caused by a hit-and-run
accident during high school
days almost completely
rewrite the Nebraska passing
records as a sophomore.
Fleetfooted Joe Orduna and
Dick Davis, two outstanding
Omaha products, give the
Nebraska running backfield
constant threats for potential
breakaway scoring power
Tom Penney, a two-year let
list ot ends wincn teatures a
dazzling array of sophomore
talent.
The defensive secondary is
rated strong, returning many
of the players who enabled
Nebraska to lead the national
collegiate statistics in pass
defense and total defense last
year. Linebackers are con
sidered to be experienced and
the line will be faster, but
will miss the explosiveness of
a 238-pound Meylan.
So the Huskers look good!
on paper. The team has been
chosen to be runner-up in the i
conference race, with I
Oklahoma successfully!
defending the championship it
won last year, by pre-seasonj
predictors.
But other teams look good
on paper also. Missouri
always has a potential win
ner, according to most Big
Eight coaches. Colorado,
which was picked to win the
league race last season, lost
many of its stars: but the
Golden Buffaloes also return
Away
a healthy nucleus with which
to work. Kansas, one of the
biggest surprises of last year
(it crushed Nebraska 10-0 in
1967) hopes to be more than
a surprise this year. Iowa
State has a new coach. And
Kansas State and Oklahoma
State appear stronger.
And then there are the non
conefrence foes. Wymoming,
Utah and Minnesota all offer
the highest calibre of competition.
So it looks like another
typical year of Husker
Hysteria. Seat 65.000
screaming fans (decked in
flaming scarlet outfits which
rival even the hippiest I within
the confines of Memorial
Stadium . . . Drum up the
175 man Cornhusker
Marching Band . . . Uncork
the prohibited bottles which
always manage their way into
the stadium . . . Grumble,
hiss, cheer, laugh, squirm,
swear . . . Predict, analyze,
give up . . . But always come
back for more.
Presidential hopeful George
WaL'aee, former Governor of
Alabama who formed his own
American-Independent party
to be placed on the November
ballot, is the guest on a
special hour-long color
feature on the Nebraska
Educational Television
Networ'- tonight at 10:30.
The program will b e
moderated by National ETV
correspondent Paul Niven. It
was taped, Sunday, Aug.ll, in
Montgomery. Ala., . and
focuses on the growth of the
Wallace movement;, the new
conservatism; state's rights;
and Wallace's conception of
the Presidency.
This interview marks the
fourth program of NET
JOURNAL specials concern
ing major presidential
hopefuls.
Wednesday's BLACK
fftl
Van
Peebles
JOURRNAL (Aug. 14, 8 p.m.)
includes:
A profile of Melvin Van
Peebles, the first Negro to
direct a feature film for
general distrubution ("The
- Story of a Three Day Pass").
j The movie was filmed in
I France and concerns the
relationship of a young
American black soldier with
an attractive French woman.
A report on the
Mississippi Freedom
Demo .'atic party which, four
years ago, challenged the all
white delegation to the
Democratic national conven
tion, and which is currently
holding its national conven
tion throughout the state.
A study of self
determination in Roosevelt
City, Ala.
This is the last issue of the
SUMMER NEBRASKAN, and
it is impossible to run the
entire remaining schedule of
the Nebraska ETV Network.
But . NETV will continue to
offer a variety of programm
ing, designed to stimulate
thought and provide 'enter-
I ' .';' '
State's Populists Flourished
Continued from Page 1
But one third party the
Populists lived a iong and
healthy life.
Populism was an outgrowth
of the Grange movement and
the Farmers' Alliance an
organization of disgruntled
farmers who found it im
possible to obtain relief
through their state legislative
representatives.
On Sept. 1, 1890. the
Nebraska Farmers' Alliance:
sponsored a parade in Lin- j
coin, marking the first)
celebration of Labor Day ini
the State of Nebraska
Media Program Features
Experimental Film Series
a a a a m m
Current Movies
a a
A film festival of "movies
that teach" continues Tues
day and Wednesday (Aug. 13
14) at Love Library
Auditorium.
Sponsored by the Instruc
tional Media Center of the
University of Nebraska Ex
tension Division, the festival
features the latest films
designed for the classroom.
But the films are experimen
tal in that each is noted for
exceptional camera technique
or story content.
The festival began yester
day with "New Trends in
Story." Today's topic is "New
Trends in Human Relations."
The last series is 'New
Trends in the Fine Arts."
Both programs will b e
screened from 12:00 p.m. to
2:00 p.m.
The Program:
New Trends in
Human Relations
August 13 Tuesday 12:00 to
2:00 p.m.
Phoebe: Story of a
premarital pregnancy
minutes b&w (National Film
Board of Canada).
This film depicts the emo
tional turmoil a young girl
suffers after she discovers
she is pregnant. Grand Prix
Award
Girl to Woman 16
m i n utes color (Churchill
Films). A new film for girls
explaining human growth and
development during the
turbulent change from
girlhood to womanhood.
The GAME 28
m i n u tes color (National
Film Board of Canada). A
casual relationship between a
boy and girl ceases to be
casual. Sexual relations from
a teenage boy's viewpoint are
explored.
Boy to Man 16 minutes
color (Churchill Films). An
important film for boys deal
ing candidly with the secon
dary and primary sexual
changes of adolescence in the
male.
New Trends in
The Fine Arts
August 14 Wednesday
12:00 to 2:00 p.m.
Discovering the Music of
Japan 20 miuntes color
(Film Associates). Tradi
tional and Major instruments
of Japan are explained
against the background of a
beautiful tea-house setting.
Face of Lincoln 54 minutes
b9w (U. Southern Calif.).
Professor Merrill Gage of the
Department of Sculpture at;
the University of Southern;
, B j California describes the life '
O i A I 1 T - 1 1
ui nuraiia m uncuin as ne ;
sculptures in clay a lifelike j
bust of the sixteenth presi-j
dent.
Discovering Creative Pat
tern 17 minutes color (Film
Associates). Pattern is visual
organization through;
rhythmic repetition. Patterns
are shown in the cells and
surfaces of living
organisms.
Glass 11 minutes color
(McGraw-Hill). Against a
musical background the
skilled glass craftsman
demonstrates mass produc
tion as contrasted to hand
skilled craftsman. Filmed at
the Royal Glassworks at
Leerdam Netherlands.
Begone Dull Care 9 minutes
color (National Film Board
of Canada). Created by
Noreman McLaren and
Evelyn Lambert by painting
directly on film. Interpretive
music played by Oscar
Peterson trio. This film is
considered a classic in the
category fil mas art.
Tunes Farnlsbni by Ibealer. Timtt:
un. utM facai 9m. bU faq
LINCOLN
CooperLincoln: Kiddies Mat
inee, 1:00. 'Gone With The Wind',
8: GO.
Varsity: "How Sweet It Is',
1:09, 3:14, 5:19, 7:24, 9:29.
State: The Swimmer', 1:00,
3:01, 5:08, 7:12, 9:16.
Joyo:
r: 10. 9:
Yours, Mine And Ours',
10.
Stuart: The Detective', 1:05,
3:10. 5:15. 7:20, 9:25.
Nebraska: 'For The Love Of
Ivy', 1:15, 3:05, 4:55, 7:00, 9:10.
84(h & O: Cartoon, 8:55. 'Salt
And Pepper", 9:02. 'The
Scalphunters', 10:59. Last
complete show, 10:00.
West O: Cartoon 8:50. 'In Cold
Blood'. 8:57. Firecreek', 11:28.
Last Complete Show, 9:45.
Starriew: C a r to o n. 8:50.
'Angels From Hell', 8:57, 11:55.
'Conqueror Worm', 10:41.
OMAHA
Indian Hills: '2001', 8:00.
Day celebration
The Lincoln Journal, then
a morning paper, deplored
the use of a parade for
political purposes such as the
promotion of the "maverick
candidates" on the "mongrel
ticket" sponsored by the
Alliance.
But the party blossomed.
According to records compil
ed in a Depth Report on
Nebraska Politics published
by the NU School of
Journalism, in 1890 the voters
tossed Republicans out of
j major offices for the first
Spvpii rtifforpnt nninns uppp ""lc rF''
wun uiajunes in me nouse
and the Senate.
In 1892 a Populist was sent
to the U.S. Senate, William
V. Allen. And, in 1894, Silas
A. Holcomb was elected
governor of Nebraska on a
represented and the parade
was called the largest parade
in the city's history (by the
local Farmers' Alliance
newspaper). Commenting in
his newspaper, the Alliance j
editor said "for vears thevl
(the workers) have been Populist ticket. After 1898, the
petitioning for rights and' party's power began to
redress of grievances and the weaken, and the movement
me
new
mottoes, songs, speeches,
etc., (of) today speak in
thunder tones just what the
grievances are . . . Certain
is it that the Giant, Monopoly,
faces a formidable foe when
he saw the parade of Lan
caster County's first Labor
of
the
quietly bowed out
political spotlight in
century.
In 1912, Nebraskans joined
the third party movement
which resulted after a split
in the Republican Party. It
had nominated William
Howard Taft as its candidate.
But Teddy Roosevelt broke
away, forming the
Progressive Party. The
Democrats ran W o o d r o w
Wilson, who won in part
because of the breakdown of
the Republicans. A fourth
candidate, Eugene Debs,
polled over ten thousand votes
on the Socialist ticket that
year in Nebraska.
But the beginning of World
War One saw the Midwest.
Nebraska included, become a
stalwart of isolationism, and
on the road to arch
conservatism.
Nebraskans were not great
supporters of Henry Wallace's
Progressive Party in 1948.
But, twenty years later,
another Wallace, George,
successfully brought his third
party (American-Independent)
to Nebraska at a con
vention in Omaha on March
4.
And now the two left-wing
parties are in the formation
stage.
Wallace
tainme-. Some highlights:
-NET FESTIVAL: "Ell
ington at the Cote d'Azur."
(Tues., Aug. 20 at 9 p.m.)
Filmed in France, the pro
gram teatures Duke Ellington
ana n' band with the in
comparable Ella Fitzgald.
who, by the way, will appear
in the Nebraska Union
Performing Artists Series this
fall m Lincoln.
CHICAGO FESTIVAL:
(Wed. Aug. 21 at 9 p.m.) Tl
program will sketch n
portrait of the uban Nebro
through the poetry of Arn:i
Bontemps, from the Harlem
Renaissance to the n e w
creative UDsurge of the 60's.
The entire ETV Schedule
can be found in the televisions
listings of the local
daily newspapers.
ALSO
TOSEtfaSiZ
New Travelers Cafe
and Motel
4040 Cornhusker Highway
Open 24 Hours
Good Eating Specials, 95c $1
Cleanliness Our Motto
RAINBOW
TRAILER COURT
Spaces Available
Halfway between Ag and
1801 Adams
City campuses.
4853411
G V Wl 1 II lull " T i . A THTTTS73t -ITfljlrifM mm mtn4
Burt
Lancaster
c . The
Swimmer
TECHNICOLOR' &G&
look for the golden arches . . . McDonald's
5305 O' St.
865 No. 27th St
ANYTIME IS POPCORN TIME!
Caramel Cora
Cheese Cora
Popcorn Bolls
CLIFTON'S
CORN CRIB
1150 No. 48th
Across frm Vriknvatm
SHOW AND
TELL . . .
That's CAR-CHEK
Our 230-point report
SHOWS what's right,
what's wrong with your
car . . . Tells your mech
anic what's to be done,
let CAR-CHEK and TELL
you.
ALL OPERATING FUNC
TIONS TESTED ELEC
TRONICALLY. OPEN EVERY DAY
Call 434-6351
1300 N. 4Sih
. ,H ml ' - ,
I tmf f, ,
I ? , ' ' ' '
Come to
QUE BALL
WONDERING WHAT TO DO FOR
RECREATION THIS SUMMER?
and Snooker
Pocket Billiards
Rates 45c per hour
Special Summer
1332 "P" SI.
ml ft 1 . aaaaaaaaai - -- feiv
HOW SWEE
IT IS
to sec the first motion picture to tell the entire freaked
out, mind blown, turned-of f, switched-on world
just exactly how sweet it is.
7
We're on the GROW et
the "BURGER CENTER of Uncoln"
We're expanding our facilities to give you
more dining enjoyment, so bepr with us
during our construction. You still get our
fast, friendly service end good food.
One block north of Vine on 27th
1
'4
JAMES GARNER DEBBIE REYNOLDS
MAURICE RONET
Sweet
IT1S1
fAUL DfNDE I MO TERRY-THQMAS ASjKjtRTnitfJ
WE NEVER CLOSE
AT
LDDWDLD
aaatiiBBS gj aaalaaaB
LOWEST PRICES
ON
CIGARETTES
No Better Gas Sold
Anywhere
; It
" ",si.
DIVIDEND BONDED
GAS
i
16th & P Sts.
JUST SOUTH OF CAMPUS
CAR-CHEKL
OlAaNOSTW CENTSi
STARTS TODAY