The daily Nebraskan. ([Lincoln, Neb.) 1901-current, April 20, 1966, Page Page 6, Image 6

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    The Daily Nebraskan
Wednesday, April 20, 1966
page 5
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Faculty
Support
: Cont from page 1, col. 3
; Ohio State position because
. of the "challenge to build and
"strnegthen" the Schoo lof
. Journalism there.
I "The good luck wishes for
the future extended by Ne-
braska publishers more than
: counter the blistering com
; ments of faculty dissidents at
Ohio State," Hall said.
The dissenting faculty
. members at Ohio State made
varying comments concerning
Hall's appointments and re
" cent statements made by him.
Edward Mullins, Ohio State
faculty member, said that
Hall s remarks had destroyed
any chance for him to win
faculty support at Ohio State.
Acting Director Barton
said Hall's statements were
an attempt to drive teachers
out of the school and were a
"disservice to the students
and to the cause of responsi
ble journalism."
Director Plans
'Singers9 Tryouts
Auditions for University
Singers will be held during
the next three weeks accord
ing to Earl Jenkins, director.
Interested students are invit
ed to arrange a time for au
dition, room 104, Music Building.
O ill
im hiiiiu i . mmm row.rTimTirMIir ih.iii i.iottow. n miiiniinnuiinr i in r n i , ., IM
EIGHT . . . University coeds have been chosen finalists for the Nebras
ka Intercollegiate Rodeo. The rodeo begins Saturday at the Nebraska
State Fair Grounds. Finalists are Barb Hopewell, left, Pam Oswald, Sally
Roberts, Mary Lea Cooksley, Sherry Shad bolt, Liz Aitken and Marilyn
Fuhrman.
Head Of Draft Board Urges
All Registrants To Take .Test
Ml J
When you can't
afford to be dull,
sharpen your wits
with NoDozTM
ftoDoz Keep Alert Tablets fight off
the hazy, lazy feelings of mentat
sluggishness. NoDoz helps restore
your natural mental vitality.. .helps
Quicken physical reactions. You be
,ome more naturally alert to peopls
and conditions around you. Yet
. No 002 is as safe as coffee. Anytime
. . .when you can't afford to be dull,
I sharpen your wits with NODoz.
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AtaDo j : . itj3 if
Or
The head of the Nebraska
Selective Service, General
Guy N. Henninger, urges all
registrants who desire a fur
ther deferment to take the
Selective Service College
Qualification Examination.
In a news release from the
Selective Service office, Gen.
Henninger commented, "judg
ing from the numerous ques
tions being asked by regis
trants and their parents,
there seems to be a substan
tial lack of understanding of
the significance of the test."
Applications for the test
must be postmarked no later
than Saturday, April 23. The
applications and bulletins for
the test may be secured at
the information window in the
administration building.
The tests will be given May
14, May 21, and June 3. The
Debate Society
Elects Dr. Laase
National Head
A University speech profes
sor was elected president of a
national debate socity at a
tournament in Reno, Neb.,
during the Easter vacation.
Dr. Leroy T. Laase, chair
man of the department of
speech and dramatic art, will
assume the presidency of the
Delta Sigma Rho-Tau Kappa
Alpha honorary organization
for one year.
Two Lincoln students
sophomore Richard Sherman
and freshman Vernon Jewett,
participated in the DSR-TKA
national debate and forensic
tournament. Thev won 5-1 in
the preliminary rounds of de
bate and were eliminated in
the octa finals by the winner
of the tournament, the Uni
versity of Southern California,
Miss Cathie Shattuck and
Randy Prier participated in
the Student Congress of DSR-
TKA. Prier was elected chair
man of the press committee
in the Mudent Congress.
Please don't
zlupf Sprite.
It makes
plenty of noise
all by itself.
Sprite, you recall, Is
the soft drink that's
so tart and tingling,
we Just couldn't keep
it quiet.
Flip its lid and it
really flips.
Bubbling, fizzing,
gurgling, hissing and
carrying on all over
the place.
An almost exces
sively lively drink.
Hence, to zlupf is
to err.
What is zlupfing?
Zlupfing is to drinking what
smacking one's lips is to
eating.
It's the staccato buzz you
make when draining the last few
deliciously tangy drops of
Sprite from the bottle with a
straw.
Zzzzzlllupf I
It's completely uncalled for.
Frowned upon in polite society.
And not appreciated on campus
either.
But. If zlupfing Sprite
Is absolutely essential to your
enjoyment: if a good healthy
zlupf is your idea of heaven,
well... all right.
But have a heart. With a
drink as noisy as Sprite, a
lililfi zlupf goes a long, long
way.
'ART
University has been designat
ed as a testing center.
The State Directors expect
high school students to pass
the test without difficulty. A
grade of seventy or more is
evidence favoring a reg
istrant's continued deferment.
Four elements of criteria
will be weighed by the local
board in making their deci
sion of classification of a stu
dent: (1) Is the student full
time; (2) Is his work satis
factory; (3) the results of the
College Qualification Test of
seventy or more (4) His class
standing in college.
Guidelines concerning class
standing are: (a) Upper one-
half of the full-time male stu
dents at the end of the first
college year; (b) Upper two
thirds of the full-time male
students in his class at the
end of the second college
year; or, (c) The upper three
fourths of the full-time male
students in his class at the
end of the third college year.
General Henninger also
pointed out that students wish
ing to pursue a degree in
graduate or professional
school must have ranked in
the upper one-fourth of the
full-time male students in his
class, or attained a score of
eighty or more on the Selec
tive Service Test.
IFC To Reconsider ZBT Request
A motion to reconsider the
colonization of Zeta Beta Tau
is scheduled to be made at
the Wednesday meeting of the
Interfraternity Council.
Gary Larsen, IFC Presi
dent, said the reconsidera
tion motion would be made
due to new information relat
ing to ZBT's request.
Reconsideration of the mo
tion would open the way so
another vote could be taken
after discussion of the situa
tion. Larsen said the Executive
Helmets Gone, Parking Fines Up
Two recent city actions,
one repealing the crash hel
met ordinance and the other
raising parking fines ?1, are
likely to affect University stu
dents. The City Council, on a 6-1
vote, passed an ordinance re
pealing the law requiring any
drivers or passengers on a
motor driven cycle to wear
a crash helmet on any city
street if traveling in excess
of 25 m.p.h.
University students were
among those appearing at an
earlier public hearing on t h e
issue. Those appearing
against the old ordinance not
ed that it did not properly de
fine a crash helmet and that
it was an invasion of private
rights.
The old ordinance would
Accountants Plan
Panel Discussion
The National Association of
Accountants will sponsor a
pane; discussion open to the
general public Wednesday at
7 p.m. in the Nebraska Un
ion. Four accountants represent
ing public accounting, cost
accounting, financial institu
tions and trust officers will
discuss their various fields.
also have affected three
wheel scooters. A representa
tive of Cushman Motors said
that the crash helmet would
require his company to raise
the height of the cab and thus
decrease the safety of the ve
hicle by raising the center of
gravity.
In voting against the repeal
ordinance, Councilman John
Mason said he thought hel
mets should be worn by pas
sengers and drivers of two
wheel motor driven cycles.
GOP Candidates
Speak Thursday
The University Young Re
publicans will present the last
in a series of pre-primary
programs to bring candidates
to the campus Thursday.
Bruce Hagemiester, Rob
ert Denny, Robert Krall and
Loran Schmidt will speak at
the 7:30 p.m. meeting which
will be held in the Nebraska
Union.
Hagemiester of Hemingford
is a candidate for governor.
Denny, a Fairbury lawyer;
Krall, a Lincoln journalist;
and Schmidt, a David City
farmer, are all candidates for
Congress from the First Con
gressional District.
Committee is urging all hous
es to vote in favor of the re
consideration motion.
A motion is also scheduled
to be made regarding the se
lection of Rush Book Editor.
The motion would schedule
the selection of Rush Book
Editor. The motion would
editor prior to the summer
vacation rather than after va
cation as has been done in
the past.
Amendments to the Consti
tution will also be introduced.
Ifk PIZZA HUT j
SW sfV Onion Sausage f
Vi mTt Mushroom Anchovy
rfri MonaroKa Chotie J
xjlv iJj1 Hamburger X
jKl!. 4 Crein Pepper Pepperonl J
pkaJ Pizza Supreme j
VV .. I "IMM J
Y Souiage f
I Order By Phone Faster Service j
(ALLOW APPROXIMATELY 20 MINUTES) !
OPEN r DIAl . ao j
11:30 AM 489-4601 Friday SaturtaV 1 AM 1
DAILY All Other Days . Midnight j
177 A Ml BT
I "WHERE QUALITY REIGNS SUPREME" j
I 46th A 0 Str Lincoln j
We set out to ruin
some ball bearings
failed successfully
and
The Bell System has many small, automatic
telephone offices around the
country. The equipment in them
could operate unattended for
ten years or so, but for a problem.
The many electric motors in those offices
needed lubrication at least once a year. Heat
from the motors dried up the bearing oils,
thus entailing costly annual maintenance.
To stamp out this problem, many tests
were conducted at Bell Telephone
Laboratories. Lubricant engi
neer George H. Kitchen decided
to do a basic experiment that
would provide a motor with the
worst possible conditions. He deliberately set
out to ruin some ball bearings
by smearing them with an
icky guck called molybdenum
disulfide (MoS2),
Swock! This solid lubricant, used a certain
way, actually increased the life expectancy
of the ball bearings by a factor
of ten! Now the motors can run
for at least a decade without
lubrication.
We've learned from our
"failures." Our aim: investigate
everything.
The only experiment that can
really be said to "fail" is the
one that Is never tried.
BeirSystem
American Ittepfiont t Ttlignph ind Asuclattit Compinlii
Councilman John Corn
stock, who asked for a public
hearing after the original or
dinance was passed, said the
crash helmet ordinance went
beyond the city's jurisdiction.
Ralph Nelson, city attor
ney, in a letter to Emmett
Junge, public safety director,
said the fees for parking vio
lations will be raised $1.
The City Council has indi
cated they may seek ways to
block the increase.
The increase, brought on by
state law) is for the Nebras
ka Judges Retirement fund,
which provides pensions for
all state judges.
Nelson said that in conver
sations he has heard at the
Statehouse, there may be an
attempt to repeal or modify
the law.
The increase applies to all
court, c a s e s, in Municipal
Court, according to Nelson.
The charge applies whether a
person is found guilty or inno
cent. The new fines are $8 for ob
structing traffic and disre
garding a traffic sign; $4 for
improper p a r k i n g and im
proper turns; $3 for overtime
parking and defective vehi
cles, and $2 for pedestrian vi
loations (jaywalking).
Lincoln and Omaha muni
cipal court clerks have been
collecting the additional $1 in
court fees.
Parking meter violations
will now be $2,
BOOTSTRAPPERS
(TEACHERS AND GRAD STUDENTS, TOO)
MONEY
IN I DAY
ON YOUR
SIGNATURE
AND
ARRANGED
BY PHONE
$25 TO
$2000
MONEY MONTHLY NO. OF AMOUNT
YOU PET PAYMENT MO. PMTI. OP NOT!
89.42 i 5.00 24 $ 120.00
340.27 19.00 24 456.00
600.18 28.00 30 840.00
997.37 45.00 30 1350.00
1491.97 57.00 36 2052.00
1960.97 73.00 36 2628.00
Abevi paymtntt Includi all chant.
Cash for any purpose. Just phone and
fell us how much you want. Pick up the
cash at your convenience. No co
signers. Same day service.
DIAL Finance Company
124 North 12th Street
1701 "0" Street
Diol 432-8556
Dial 435-4395
feg ftlficlljBlS Am
(By Otemthor cf'RaUy Round Che YlaQjkqtT'
"Dobie GUlit," etc)
ROOMMATES REVISITED
This morning's mail brought a letter from a student a
a prominent Western university (Princeton). "Dear Sir,''
he writes. "In a recent column you said it was possible to
get along with your roommate if you try hard enough.
Well, I'd like to see anyone get along with my roommate!
Mervis Trunz (for that is his name) practices the ocarina
all night long, keeps an alligator, wears knee-cymbals, and
collects airplane tires. I have tried everything I can with
Mervis Trunz, but nothing works. I am desperate, (signed)
Desperate."
Have you, dear Desperate, really tried everything? Have
you, for example, tried a measure so simple, so obvious,
that it is easy to overlook? I mean, of course, have you of
fered to share your Personna Super Stainless Steel Blade
with Mervis Trunz?
To have a friend, dear Desperate, you must be a friend.
And what could be more friendly than sharing the bounty
of Personna Super Stainless Steel Blades? Who, upon en
joying the luxury of Personna, the nickless, scrapeless, tug
less, hackless, scratchless, matchless comfort of Personna,
the ease and breeze, the power and glory, the truth and
beauty of Personna who, I say, after such jollies could
harden his heart against his neighbor? Nobody, that's who
not even Mervis Trunz especially not today with the
new Personna Super Blade bringing us new highs in speed,
comfort, and durability. And here is still a further bonus:
Personna is available both in Double Ede style and Inc-i
tor style.
No, dear Desperate, your problem with Mends Truro
tar from insoluble. In fact, as roommate problems go, it a
pretty small potatoes. Compare it, for example, to the clas
sic case of Basil Metabolism and E. Pluribus Ewbank.
Basil and E. Pluribus, roommates at a prominent East
ern university (Oregon) were at an impassable impasse,
Basil could study only late at night, and E. Pluribus could
not stay awake past nine p.m. If Basil kept the lights on,
the room was too bright for E. Pluribus to sleep. If E. Pluri
bus turned the lights off, the room was too dark for Basfl
to study. What to do?
Well sir, these two intelligent American kids found an
answer. They got a miner's cap for Basil! Thus, he had
enough light to study by, and still the room was dark
enough for E. Pluribus to sleep.
It must be admitted, however, that this ingenious solu
tion had some unexpected sequelae. Basil got so enchanted
with his miner's cap that he switched his major from 18th
Century poetry to mining and metallurgy. Shortly after
graduation he had what appeared to be a great stroke of
luck: while out prospecting, he discovered what is without
question the world's largest feldspar mine. This might have
made Basil very rich except that nobody, alas, has yet dis
covered a use for feldspar. Today Basil, a broken man,
squeezes out a meagre living as a stalagmite in Ausable
Chasm.
Nor has E. Pluribus fared conspicuously better. Once
Basil got the miner's cap, E. Pluribus was able to catch up
on his long-lost sleep. He woke after nine days, refreshed
and vigorous more vigorous, alas, than he realized. It waa
the afternoon of the Dean's tea. E. Pluribus stood in line
with his classmates, waiting to shake the Dean's hand. At
last his turn came, and E. Pluribus, full of strength and
hea th gave the Dean a firm handshake-so firm, indeed,
tht?U ve of theJI?ean 8 knuckles were permanently fused!
t The eS? T d forua m,llion dol,are and' f couree, won.
Today E. Pluribus, a broken man, is paying off his debt by
walking the Dean s cat every afternoon for ten cents an houL
We, the maker of Penonna Blades and the tporwon of thh
' f '"mn !f" attempt to expertise about roommate,.
But we will tell you about a great thavtng-mate to PermmZ
Burma Shape It eoakt ringt around anu otbm latbtM
xxrue in reular and menUiai. nv-m
TINGLING. WE
PDI1C M RtlltTlfttB tN.OI H.rM
KEEP IT QUIET.
,,i-r., r- .'vfi.r';-''