The daily Nebraskan. ([Lincoln, Neb.) 1901-current, March 15, 1965, Page Page 3, Image 4

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    Monday, March 15, 1965
The Daily Nebraskan
Page 3
AA JI? B if .1 i
eoiBcai cnooi puoae
ne Of Nations Lowest
By Priscilla Mullins
Senior Staff Writer
The College of Medicine budget re
quest for teaching would provide "many
of the College's essential needs," accord
ing to Dr. Cecil Wittson, dean, even
though the College has one of the "low
est operating budgets in the nation."
Wittson said that the $2,941,829 teach
ing portion of the $7,820,000 budget request
"would not bring the operating budget
to even the average of the medical col
leges in our area."
The request provides for some addi
tions to the faculty and for some increase
in other expenses relative to instruction,
he said.
Due to the tremendous advances in
medicine in the past decade, medical col
leges must modernize their facilities, im
prove and enlarge their teaching staffs
and have more elaborate and expensive
equipment," Wittson said.
Medical subjects such as microbi
ology, which used to require a single pro
fessor, now require larger staffs with
different kinds of specialists. There has
also been a great increase of medical
knowledge which has forced specializa
tion into the clinical departments as well,
he said.
"This increase in our budget is not
to increase the number of medical stu
dents, but to improve the quality of in
struction. Later, if the building program
is approved, we will be able to graduate
about twenty more physicians per year,"
according to Wittson.
He remarked that there is a growing
national shortage of physicians. "This
country should have been graduating
about 11,000 students per year. Instead, it
has been graduating only slightly more
than 7,000 doctors per year."
Wittson said that Nebraska has a
shortage of over 200 doctors. However,
"since 74 per cent of the practicing
physicians of this state were trained in
the state, there is the possibility that most
of the future additions to the state's medi
cal profession will come from the gradu
ates of the Nebraska medical colleges."
He said he did not think that Nebraska
can expect to import physicians in any
large numbers from other states."
In addition to the education and train
ing of medical students, the College also
has a "heavy responsibility in graduate
and continuing education, graduate train
ing for the interns and residents and
continuing education for the practicing
physician."
The largest part of the College's
budget request is to go for the proposed
new University Hospital. The cost of the
proposed facility has jumped from $5.4 to
$8.4 million, according to institutional ex
ecutives. Wittson said that features not includ
ed in the cost figures when the hospital
was first proposed "are now considered
essential." These features include a cam
pus kitchen, central supply area and an
out-patient clinic.
The 1963 Legislature appropriated
$2.5 million and was hoping that an equal
sum might be received from the federal
government.
The University is now asking $3.7 mil
lion more for the 200-bed unit during the
1965-67 biennium. The work will be com
pleted pending an additional $1.2 million
appropriation from the 1967 Legislature.
The University Hospital and Clinics
serve two primary purposes, according to
Wittson. First, they are the laboratories
for the teaching and training of various
students.
Second, they provide extensive serv
ice to the people of the entire state. Per
sons who -are unable to afford private
medical care are referred to the Univer
sity Hospital from physicians of all the
counties of the state.
The Hospital budget reflects the pres
ent day costs of hospital care, according
to Wittson. "It is true that the per day
cost is much larger than ten or twenty
years ago. However, case costs have not
increased at as rapid a rate as would
seem by comparing per diem cost."
"A modern hospital today handles many
more patients per bed per year than form
erly and per case costs have not increased
at the rate per diem cost would indicate,"
he said.
The School of Nursing which is includ
ed in the .College must also "meet the
challenge of modern medicine in its in
struction and requirements."
The same factors are true in the
School of Medical Technology and the vari
ous courses given for other health associ
ated personnel, according to Wittson.
He said that the College does not an
ticipate a large full time clinical faculty,
but expects to do a great deal of its
teaching in affiliated private hospitals
with participation of selected voluntary
faculty of the private hospitals in the
community. The major increase in this
program, he said, is the three persons
who will coordinate the teaching in the
private hospitals.
Special
Film Showing of the
UNITED AIRLINES
'Stewardess Story'
FOR WOMEN WHO ARE
INTERESTED IN A REWARDING
AND CHALLENGING CAREER
FIRST YEAR'S
AVERAGE EARNINGS
-S410MONTH
To Qualify You Must Be:
52".5'9"
19V2-26 YearM
Single
High School Graduate
Contact Lenses
Acceptable
vision 20200
Corrected to 2030
Monday, March 22
4:00 p.m.
340 NEBRASKA UNION
SPECIAL CAMPUS
INTERVIEWS
TUESDAY, MARCH 23
FOR APPOINTMENT
CONTACT: COLLEGE
PLACEMENT OFFICE
310 NEBRASKA UNION
"An Equal Opportunity Employer"
Banquet Will Honor
Tassel Pledge, Active
The Tassel's Annual Initia
tion Banquet will be held
Wednesday at 5:30 in the Pan
American room of the Ne
braska Union.
Awards will be presented
at this time to the Outstand
ing Active and Pledge.
TODAY
PLACEMENT 0 F V 1 C E
LUNCHEON 12:30 p.m., 241
Nebraska Union.
PANHELLENIC COFFEE i
p.m., 240 Nebraska Union.
TASSELS 4:30 p.m., 232 Ne
braska Union.
UNION SPECIAL EVENTS
COMMITTEE 4:30 p.m., 235
Nebraska Union.
BUILDERS Campus Promo
tion 4:30 p.m., 332 Nebraska
Union.
INTER-VARSITY L a d y-
BUG 5:30 p.m., 334 Nebraska
Union.
TOWNE CLUB 6 p.m.. Pan
American room Nebraska
Union.
SIGMA DELTA TAU 6 p.m.,
Pawnee room Nebraska
Union.
PHI MU DINNER 6:30
p.m., 241 Nebraska Union.
KOSMET KLUB REHEAR
SAL 7 p.m., North party room
Nebraska Union.
UNICORNS 7 p.m., 232 Ne
braska Union.
KOSMET KLUB REHEAR
SAL 7:00 p.m., Ballroom Stu
dent Union.
TOMORROW
U.N.S.E.A. 7 p.m., Love
Library Auditorium.
Cowboy
To Speak
Adventures of a 10,000 mile
motorcycle trip from Norway
to Africa will be related by
Danny L i s k a, Nebraska's
wandering cowboy.
Liska will speak at 4:30 p.m.
on March 17 in the East Union
lounge. A coffee hour will
follow. There is no admission
charge.
Films of the 15-month jour
ney will take the audience to
a reindeer roundup in Lap
land, behind the Iron Curtain
of Czechoslovakia, along the
camel caravan routes of t h e
African Sahara and behind the
"Veil of Arabia" to view Arab
life, mosques and harems.
After leaving Egypt, Liska
and his wife journeyed to the
source of the Nile and into
Africa.
The major part of Liska's
story was filmed among the
more primitive tribes of Af
rica to tell a story of voo-doo
magic and of strange cults
and customs.
Liska has previously trav
eled 95.000 miles through 17
countries from the northern
tip of Alaska to the southern
tip of South America.
The Plainview News wrote
of Liska's travels, "His rem
iniscing on amazing adven
tures makes you feel like you
were there . . . his gift of
talk is astoundingly vivid and
interesting."
Liska served as Yul Bryn
ner's double and stand-in dur
ing the filming of Taras Bul
ba while in South America.
'C Average Required
At Most Universities
Militzer Compares Systems;
Explains Practice Elsewhere
r
A "C" average is the
quirement for graduation
most universities around the
country, according to Dean
Walter Militzer of the Arts
and Sciences College.
Militzer. who started the
idea which resulted in t h e
change of the University's
grading system, said that the
"C" is indicative of passing
in good standing, while the
"D" represents passing in
poor standing.
Militzer's comments were
directed toward a minor stu
dent reaction to the new sys
tem. Some students have been
saying that a "C sounds worse
than a 5 on a grade report."
He said he felt that the
change is a "good thin g."
Many faculty members have
stated that they think it is a
step in the right direction,
he said. The faculty mem
bers "don't feel thev can
discriminate any more than
three or four grade points."
The new system will "de-
emphasize just working for a
grade," Militzer said. He
noted that there are several
factors involved in the grad
ing emphasis, however. These
would include the kind of
course being taken and the in
structor. "Actually," Militzer said,
"it's really a matter of getting
on the same basis as 95 per
cent of the other colleges in
the country."
There is somewhat of a
problem in equating the 9-8-7
system to the A-B-C, accord
ing to Militzer. The "A" used
to be the same as a 9, but
now it tends to include the 8
and the 9, he said. Formerly
the 9 included only the top 3
per cent of the class, but this
has changed too, he said.
As far as putting the over
all averages together under
the two systems, Militzer said
"we don't have to fuse one
grade average into another."
If necessary for house scho
lastic competition or class
re-; standing, this would be done,
for he said.
The students will have to do
a little adjusting to this new
system. Militzer said, but "I
rather think that most of them
will welcome the system."
NEBRASKAN
APPLAUDS
Winners of the Nebras
ka Union Photo Contest held
in February are:
Black and white pictorial:
1. Roy Abbott 2. Gordon
Scholz 3. Richart Cote.
Black and white human in
terest: 1. Roy Abbott 2. Rob
ert Franklin 3. Grant Peter
son. Black and white portrait: 1.
Richard Cote 2. Susan Wiles.
Color: 1. Gordon Young 2.
Beth Lommasson 3. Karen
Truman.
Best of show: Richard Cote.
New Officers Selected
By Young Republicans
In a meeting Thursday
night, the Young Republicans
elected new officers. Six
members were elected to
leadership positions in the
organization.
John Reiser was elected
president; Cathie Shattuck,
vice-president; Mary Tall
man, secretary; Dick Weerts,
treasurer; Doug Miller, Na
tional Committeeman ; and
Marilyn B o w e n, National
Committeewoman.
President John Reiser
stated that he aimed to "make
the Republican Party the
number one political party
on campus."
"I don't like losing mock
elections," Reiser said. "We
aim to project an image palla
table and in the mainstream
of public thought."
Placement
Interviews
The following Interview! are belay
trheduled for the week of March IS,
19GS,
Ttdit, Mar. 15
l'.S. VAVV FI.ECTRONirs LABORA
TORY San Dieio AH degrees EE.,
Physlcj, Math.
peter Kncwrr sons- company
R.S.-Biu. Adm. (min of 12 hrs. acct.)l
B.S.-C.K.
SCOTT PAPER COMPANY B.S.-B.A.f
M.S.-M.A. Bus. Adm., Lib. Arts.
U.S. AERONAUTICAL CHART 4- IN
FORMATION CENTER (USAE) B.S.,
M.S.-Oeog., Geol., Math., Astron, Phy
sics, C.E.
HOVLANTKSWANSON B.S. B.A. Bui
Adm., Lib. Arts.
omCE OF THE INSPECTOR GEN
ERAL (USDA) B.S.-Bus. Adm. (24 hrs.
accts.)
MONTGOMERY WARD-Bus. A d m.t
Lib. Arts.
Torsday. Mar. IS
MCDONNELL AIRCRAFT CORPORA
TION E.E.. M.E., C.E., I.E., M a t h.,
PhvidM.
l nfTCHirEri .CALIFORNIA COMPANY
AM degrees M E.. EE., C.E., Math.,
Physics.
ARMOITI GROCERY PRODUCTS COM
PANY But. Adm., Lib. Arts.
IOWA STATE HIGHWAY COMMIS
SION BS.C.E.
THE AMERICAN RED CROSS Bache
lor's-Soc. Sci.. S.tc. Work, Edu., Mgmt.,
Pub. Adm. j Master's Soo, Work; Bache
lor'sLib. Arts, P.E.
WILSON fc COMPANY, INCORPOR
ATED B.S. Ag.Ec, Atfri.-Bus., An. Husb.,
Bus. Adm., Lib. Arts; M.S. also.
MONTGOMERY WARD As before.
Wednesday, Mar, 17
MCDONNELL AIRCRAFT CORPORA
TION As before.
LOCKHEED-CALIFORNIA COMPANY -As
before.
WILSON COMPANY As before.
CAMPBELL SOIiP COMPANY (Re
scheduled from March 1) Bus. A d m..
Bus. Engrr., Lib. Arts. Baet., Food
Tech. t
PHILADELPHIA NAVAL SHIPYARD
NAVAL BASE-B.S.-E.E., M.E., Naval
Architects.
Thursday, Mar. IB
SC1ILUMBERGER WELL SURVEYING
CORPORATION B.S.-E.E., M.E., CE..
Physics.
STATE FARM INSURANCE COM
PANIES B.S.-Bus. Adm.
ROYAL-GLOBE INSURANCE COM
PANIES All degrees-Bus. Adm., Lil
Arts.. Acctg., Engineers, Law.
BANK OF AMERICA B.S.-B.A., M.A.
M.S., MbA Bus. Adm., Econ.. Fin., Pers.,
Acctg., Banking. Agri., For. Trade.
NORTHWESTERN MUTUAL LIFE IN
SURANCE COMPANY All degrees Bus.
Adm., Law, Econ., Edu., Hist., Speech,
Dramatics, Journ., Lib. Arts.
CONTINENTAL OIL COMPANY B.S.,
MBA-Bus. Adm.
OWENS-CORNING FIBERGLAS COR
PORATION B.S.-Ch.E.. C.E., M.E., E.E.I
M.S.-Chi.E., E.E., M.E.
THE UPJOHN COMPANY-VETERI-NARY
DIVISION BS. -All Sci. Majors
Biol., Zool., An. Sci., Dairy Sci., Agri..
Phys. Sci., Bus. Adm.
Friday, Mar. IS
FEDERAL AVIATION AGENCY B.S.
C.E. PHILLIPS PETROLEUM COMPANY
B.S., M.S.-Chi.E.. M.E., E.E., C.E., Geol.,
Arch.; all degrees Chem., Ph.D. -Physios.
AMERICAN-STANDARD INDUSTRIAL
DIVISION Engineering
BANK OF AMERICA As before.
HUPP CORPORATION - RICHARDS
WILCOX DIVISION B.S.-C.K., E.E., M.
SERVICE PIPE LINE COMPANY
B.S.-E.E., M.E., C.E.
Merit System Exams
Set For Next Month
Examinations for all types
of clerical positions with the
Nebraska Department of Pub
lic Welfare, Department of
Health. Division of Employ
ment, Civil Defense Agencies
and Emergency Planning Of
fice will be given in approxi
mately 50 Nebraska cities on
Saturday, Apr. 10.
Local high school seniors
who will be seeking employ
ment in the clerical fields may
find the Apr. 10 state-wide
Merit System examinations of
importance to them. Positions
as Typist Clerk I and Stenog
rapher Clerk I are open to
high school graduates with a
Don't stumble through
the literary classics.
CLIFF'S NOTES will
help you make better
pades! These study
aids give you ;.i cleat,
concise summary and
explanation, chapter by
Chapter.CLIFF'SNOTES
are now being used by
hinh school and college
students throughout the
United States. Tliereare
over 100 different
CLIFF'S NOTES cover
ing the literary classics.
1
at your G3
favorite
bookstore
or write:
HI 1HANY MAIIUN
1 UC) U. N( IKA'IKA (,8Ml'i
litis.
rr-
An Insurance Company Career?
Talk it over with an E.M. interviewer
WBStittt
One ( the major industrial iiisuruiice comrmnies in the I'niled
overs Mutiwls of Whumui offers interestiiin, reward-
Slates, Fin
inj; careers to hundreds of college men
and women.
Some wild joined us majored in insurance, but moil were un
aware until they talked with our interviewers that their education
could he applied and their r.iins renlied in an insurance company.
Talk with our representative about the opportunities we can
offer at our office and in more than 100 cities laitfe and small
lliroiiu'iout the country.
He will he on the campus to interview senior men lor the posi
tion of CLAIM ADJUSTER, UNDERWRITER, CROUP UN
DERWRITER, und SALES CORRESPONDENT, l'or infor
mation, please contact Mr. Trunk HallKren, Director of Place
ment, Nebraska Union.
mm
Employers Mutuals of Wausau
HOME OFFICE: WAUSAU, WISCONSIN
background in appropri
ate commercial courses.
Those interested in employ
ment in the above public serv
ice agencies upon graduation
this spring should make appli
cation to take the test in the
center located nearest to
fhem. Commercial and guid
ance departments of all high
schools have information re
garding these tests.
All others interested in these
and other clerical posi
tions should also apply to take
the qualifying examinations at
this time as they are given
in centers near their place of
residence. These tests are
: given every Wednesday morn
ing in the State Capitol, but
only two or three times a year
in out-state centers.
In order to qualify for the
tests on Apr. 10, applications
must be postmarked by mid
night, Mar. 22. Applications
received after this closing
date will be processed and
scheduled for a future exami
nation period.
Announcements listing t h c
specific positions for whidi
applications will be received
should be posted in local post
offices and libraries with
copies also in the hands of
local high school commercial
teachers and guidance coun
selors, or a copy of the an
nouncement may be received
directly from the Merit Sys
tem Office, 11th Floor, State
Capitol.
Applications and informa
tion may also be obtained at
any County Welfare Office or
local office of the Division of
Employment.
March Sky Show
Features Easter
A new sky show entitled
"Easter and the Moon" will
be shown at the Ralph Muel
ler Planetarium, Sunday
March 7 through p.u-cnowist
through March 28.
The show will deal with the
moon as it influences man's
life, the determination of
Easter Sunday and the his
tory of man's use of the moon
in reckoning time. The lec
ture also will include a dis
cussion of the bright constel
lations in the March night
sky.
Sky show times: Sundays,
2:30 and 3:45 p.m., Wednes
days, 8 p.m.; Saturdays, 2:45
p.m.; other times by special
appointment.
Burr Hall Wins
Carnival Contest
The Burr East-Burr West
entry entitled "Burr Bar
Beers," won the traveling
trophy for the best booth at
the Ag "Y" sponsored Estes
Carnival.
Ag Men's entry '"Wester
land" was second and Love
Memorial Hall's "The Golden
Rod" was third.
Twelve organizations and
living units had booths de
signed to the theme "Nebras
kaland Where the West Be
gins." The booths were
judged by Dean Winston Mar
tin, Dr. Franklin Elridge, and
Miss Marcella Martin.
Winners of the dance con
test were Diane Stutheit and
Russell Sindt.
The proceeds of the evening
will be usecTTo send college
students to a YWCA-YMCA
Conference at Estes Park,
Colorado, in June.
Looking For Christian . . .
Challenge
Fellowship
Guidance
Inspection
Baptist Student Union
(SBC) Initial Meeting
Tuesday, March 23rd., Room 2415:30 p.m.
Contact:
Curol Cook,
Room 8126 Selleck for Details
STUDENT UNION