The daily Nebraskan. ([Lincoln, Neb.) 1901-current, September 25, 1963, Page Page 4, Image 4

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    I
Wednesday, Sept. 25, 1963
Page 4
The Daily Nebraskan
u Csi IT
By Roger Ebert
For Collegiate Press Service
Cfteri Not. Mr. Ebert, treetdent
t the tSSSPA and editor of le
Paflr mini, u n ( font etftore
to spend ene week ta Washington
recently lift edit the Fwwe C7eme
Nm, supplement C campus news
papers that appears twice yearly.
This la the second of a three part
article on the Peace Col pa.)
"In moss of the world, it's
six o'clock in the morning
and it's dead," Dave Pearson
said.
"When the Peace Corps
volunteer moves from a high
ly mobile society into a sleepy,
dawning world where progress
Is slow and sometimes feared,
he roust adapt rapidly if he
is to be successful."
Pearson, a Peace Corps In
formation officer, said it has
been this challenge and not
the stereotyped dangers of
mad hats, savage natives, and
wild animals that has cre
ated the most problems for
volunteers In the field.
During the first two years
f Peace Corps operation, Vol
unteers had few complaints
bout living and working con
ditions. Indeed, many govern
ments went out of their way
to see that Corpsmen had ade
quate living conditions.
But over and over, field rep
resentatives heard stories of
loneliness, boredom and soli
tude. In many areas, volun
teers were the only people
with an advanced education,
or even with the ability to
read and write.
"'Yet these Volunteers were
bright, inquisitive young peo
ple accustomed to a fast-
Innocents Organizing
Homecoming Displays
Fraternities and sororities
paired in last year's home
coming displays will have to
select new partners in the
rapidly approaching Innocents
society Homecoming display
contest.
A letter from the Innocents
homecoming committee to the
presidents of all living units
outlines the rules for partici
pation. Prizes will be awarded
ty and sorority are not al
on a joint house basis as in
the past However, a fraterni
lowed to remain paired for
two successive years.
The cost limits are $300 for
Fall Dance Starts
Ag Union Events
Ag Union's first big event
of the year will be Friday's
Fall-Roundup in the Ag Union
auditorium.
The Kopi Katz Combo from
Hastings will provide music
for the 8:30-11:30 p.m. event.
Admission Willi be $1 for sin
gle tickets and $1.50 for
couples.
AT
STEVEN'S
10
DISCOUNT
To All Students
On Any Merchandise
In The Store
Watches
Diamonds
Watch Bands
Transistors
Record Flayers
Cameras
Portable TV
Watch Repairing
Tope Recorders
Typewriters
your ceeht is goodi
lie ftaey Down Tcke
Jtay Purchase With You
Open Monday and
Thursday VntU "800
I " - - i::i'"a--
uJLj
n a fi rf rt.
(jQ d! 3
mo v In g society," Pearson
said. "To them, the apathy
and the quiet were actual en
emies, particularly for volun
teers living by themselves."
Almost all volunteers man
aged to succeed in spite of
these problems, however, and
in many cases they reported
that for the first times in
their lives thev were learning
to "really live."
"I had been exposed to an
education," Volunteer Ralph
Gilman, working on a Ghana
project, said. "But I began to
feel I'd had enough of second
hand knowledge which had
been picked over for my con
sumption. Now was the time
to learn directly from people
struggling in life."
Gilman found the slow, un
derdeveloped society of Ghana
a challenge. But in it he found
a need to be fulfilled in him
self as well as in the society.
"Americans of my genera
tion have inherited a healthy
and abundant country," he
wrote. "But this good fortune
implies the responsibility of
some constructive use re
sponsibilities to the people
yearning for an education.
"We tend to become so in
volved with our fraternities,
our jobs, our competition for
an education, and our court
ship system, that we forget
to ask: to what end? After
asking myself these questions,
I concluded that I hadn't found
all the answers in school.
"And so I came to Ghana
joint projects and $200 for a
single house project There is
also an entry fee of $15 for
joint projects and $25 for sin
gle projects to defray the ex
penses of organizing, publi
cizing, co-ordinating, and
judging the displays.
All organized living units in
good standing with Student
Affairs are eligible to com
pete. The following dormitory
groups will be considered:
Selleck Quadrangle, Women's
Residence Halls, Pound Hall,
Cather Hall, Fedde Hall, Burr
West, Burr East, and the Kel
logg Center.
Trophies will be given to the
three winners in each divi
sion. If less than ten houses
compete with single displays,
they will be judged as one
division. If there are more
than ten single entries but less
than four in either the men's
or the women's division, the
single entries will be divided
into two divisions on the basis
of size acccording to house
rolls as recorded a tthe Divi
sion of Student Affairs Office.
Intentions to build displays
and bonafide joint pairings
must be submitted by 5:00
p.m. Tuesday, October 1 at
the Innocent's mailbox at the
main desk of the Nebraska
Union. Envelopes should be
plainly marked: Innocents So
ciety, Homecoming.
Nearly-New Shop
Reopening Today
The Faculty Wives' Nearly
New Shop at 1610 R win be
open again this year.
Beginning today, the shop
will be open every Wednesday
evening from 7 'to 9. Used
clothing, household goods and
furniture are available at the
store to all University stu
dents who present their ID
card.
CLASSIFIED
ADS
POLICY
Classified ads lor the Dully
Nobraslcan must "be entered two
days In advance and must be naid
for in advance. Corrections will
be made If errors are brought to
our attention within 48 hours.
WANTED
Male Students to share furnished 4-bad-rnom
house, three blki. North of elty
ttampua, washing faellitlee. private
parklm, 711 Charleston.
Mala student to share larxe 2-hedmnm
apartment with two nthar atudrnta.
Rant tw.lWmimUi. Cnoklnf faelUtlea.
230 80. 37th Apt. 1. 477-S8B1 evenlncs.
Drummer and drama. Country Western
Bwtnc Grew. Play weekend. Cell
88.137 after I p.m.
FOR RENT
Romrm with meals; for mala etudeme.
-wa. KB SO. 17tll.
0-
U5
ui
Cob ip
not because I feel sorry that
others are not like me, and
not out of sloppy, superior
pity but because they asked
and I am able to help."
Volunteers such as Gilman,
with the ability to see long
range purposes behind short
term Peace Corps projects,
are needed if the Peace Corps
is to become a significant,
permanent form for world im
provement, Pearson said.
"Peace Corps service is not
glamorous," he said in a CPS
interview. "We've never said
it was. It's hard, and tiring,
and sometimes discouraging.
"And so the question before
ns is: now that the newspa
pers, in interviewing return
ing Volunteers, have made it
clear that boredom and
apathy go hand-in-hand with
excitement and progress in
the Corps, will young Ameri
cans still be willing to take up
the burden?"
The answer, Peace Corps
officials br'ieve, can be found
in the Ar erican student com
munity. "The Corps has no
Fofo
University of Nebraska Re
gents Monday accepted re
search and training grants to
taling $657,777, all received
through the office of Vice
Chancellor Roy G. Holly, re
search administrator, between
July 1 and Sept. 13.
Grants from three federal
agencies, US Public Health
Service, the National Science
Foundation, and the Federal
Extension Service, accounted
for 58 of the research money
received. All but $1,800 of
$118,728 for training grants
came from the U.S. Public
Health Service.
Among the 8 grants for re
search projects and pro
grams, totaling $539,049, were
the following:
$109,500 from the National
Science Foundation for con
tinuation of the Nebraska Col
lege Teachers Development
program, a five-year pilot
project now in its third year.
$39,319 from U.S.P.H.S.
for a continuing study directed
by Dr. H, P. Jacobi, biochem
ist, College of Medicine. The
study concerns arterial func
tions and hardening of the
arteries.
$34,770 from tffie Nebraska
Council for Educational Tele
vision for ETV instructional
service by KUON-TV to 3G
Nebraska school systems for
current year.
412.500 from the Lincoln
Public Schools for ETV in
structional service through
KUON-TV.
Parking Problems?
Try
13ft TO 14th
Reasonable monthly
October 18th is the
deadline for "Rag"
Subscriptions
$3
per
Semester
AA ft n 1
frVttlUldtL
snmen
corner on the idea market,"
Pearson emphasized.
And Sargent Skiver, Peace
Corps Director, told 1.200 stu
dents at the National Student
Congress, held in August at
Indiana University;
"I am here to solicit your
advice in the months ahead
. , . with that continuing sup
port, you and other Americans
will continue to build a pro
gram that represents the high
est traditions of this nation."
All May Attend
Debate Meeting
A meeting for all students
interested in intercollegiate
debate will be held in 210
Temple Building tomorrow at
7:15 p.m.
The national debate topic
for this year is, Resolved:
That the Federal government
should guarantee an oppor
tunity for high education to
tunity for higher education to
uates.
Interested students are in
vited to attend this meeting
whether they have had ex
perience or not
AW
$40,000 from Nebraska
Heart Association, support for
two years of cardiovascular
research directed by Dr. Den
ham H a r m a n, College of
Medicine.
$12,000 from U.S.P.H.S.
for support of a continuing
study of soybean growth in
hibitor, involving nutritional
Interrelation of certain anti
biotics and amino acid Imbal
ance; Dr. Raymond Borchers,
College of Agriculture.
$15,004 from U.S.Pil.S.
for continuing enzymic re
search by Chemists Robert B,
Johnston and John J. Scholz,
$18,500 from Federal Ex
tension Service for rural
Civil Defense educational
project under direction of El'
vin C Schultz.
Driving Lessons
Will Be Offered
University students, faculty
members, or their spouses
wishing to take driving les
sons should sign up at the
Physical Education building
or call extensions 2480 or 2481
by Oct 10.
Dick Klass, assistant pro
fessor of physical education
for men, said that a nominal
fee will be charged, but a
driver training car will be
provided and the students will
receive 6 to 10 lessons behind
the wheel.
Driving etuis, no driver
education, wfll be taught to
the students.
ON QUE ST.
and hourly rates.
u O
LET YOUR PARENTS
READ ALL ABOUT YOUR
UNIVERSITY IN THE STUDENTS
c p n A r Pf A M
$5
: -' ' a
Campus
Calendar
TODAY
BUILDERS Executive
Board will meet at 6:00. Reg
ular Board meeting at 7:00.
TASSELS, CORN COBS will
hold a squad leaders' meeting
at 4:15 p.m. at the East Sta
dium or, in case of rain, in
235 Nebraska Union.
KERNALS will meet at 5
p.m. at the Stadium or in the
Nebraska Union ballroom in
case of rain in order to re
ceive their season tickets and
ID's.
RED CROSS will hold an
executive board meeting at
4 p.m. in 232 Student Union.
STUDENT UNION special
events committee will meet in
332 Student Union at 4 p.m.
STUDENT COUNCIL will
meet at 4 p.m. in the Pan
American room of the Student
Union.
COMMUNITY CONCERT
ticket seller will meet at 4:30
p.m. in 334 Student Union.
STUDENT UNION hospital
ity committee will meet at
4:30 p.m. in S46 Student Union.
TOWNE CLUB will meet at
6 p.m. in 234 Student Union.
ICF will meet at 7 cm. in
the Pan American Room of
the Student Union.
kit
Ter
School Year
rn:
a
Lib
Lm
5)R
c :i trJ
Educational Music Center
To Open In Love Library
A new music center in Love
Library will be in operation
within a week according to
Frank Lundy, library direc
tor. Located on the second floor
near the humanities section,
the center will provide stu
dents and faculty with the op
portunity to listen to educa
tional records and tapes.
The center consists of four
stereo turntables and two tape
machines wired to ten booths
equipped with earphones. Stu
dent assistants will operate
the machines.
Lundy said that when fully
equipped, the facility will be
valued near $10,000 and that
it wculd cost $1,500 a year to
operate. ,We hope to main
tain a high quality with the
Reporters
ALL STUDENTS INTERESTED
IN REPORTING FOR
THE DAILY NEBRASKAN
Are invited to coffee Wednesday, September 25, hi Rmri
334, Student Union at 6:45 p.m.
LIPSTICK WARDROBE
ut Rev.on 4
wy
rej. 655
,U'" ' ' r Without HI
You can' -
CLIP AND MAIL
DAILY NEBRASKAN
ROOM SI
NEBRASKA UNION
UNIVERSITY of NCSUSSCA
LINCOLN, NEBRASKA
AMOTEIISAH
CELEOHATIOM TODAY
CAMPUS
Desi equipment we ton wuj,
commented Landy.
Some 300 records, chiefly
donated by the teaching de
partments are now available.
The collection will be ex
panded as the year pro
gresses. Intended for the serious stu
dent, the center will provide
recordings in the fields cf
speech, drama, foreign lan
guage and general knowledge.
It will be open afternoons and
evenings on a 40 hour per
week basis.
NEBRASKAN
COFFEE
6:45, 331 Union
Wonted!
3"
OPEN 10 am. DAILY
H I
Thanh You!
FREE GIFTS WITH $.50 PURCHASES AT
CITY & AG.