The daily Nebraskan. ([Lincoln, Neb.) 1901-current, March 18, 1963, Page Page 3, Image 3

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    Monday, MarcH 18, 1963
TKt Daily Nebraskan
Page 3
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LOOK FAMILIAR? This lonely Union staircase should
bring back many fond memories to the nervous hopefuls
waiting to go through interviews for AWS, IFC, WAA, IWA,
RAM, AUF and other organizations. Walking up and down
stairs is almost as relaxing as pacing to and fro in an
empty hall.
Med Students Receive
Notice Of Internships
Eighty senior medical stu
dents at the University College
of Medicine have been noti
fied of their acceptance to
intern in hospitals throughout
the nation with 47 per cent
electing to join the staffs of
Nebraska hospitals.
-Interning in Omaha hospi
tals are John Ashley, Kenneth
Austin, William Bancroft
Joseph Decker, George Eisen
hart, Kenneth Ellis, Charles
Erickson, Tom Erickson, Wen
dell Fairbanks, John Ford,
Thomas Gensler, Robert Ham
ilton, Charles E. Hamm, Rog
er Kennedy and Robert
Lynch.
William March, Terence Mc
Donnell, James McFarland,
David Merrick, Bryan Nel
son, James Nickel, Michael
O'Neil, Dean Parks, Harold
Rounsborg, Douglas Schu
macher, Charles Vest, Don
ald Waltemath, Roger Ward,
and Philip Young.
College of Medicine s t u -dents
interning at Lincoln
hospitals are Robert Albee,
Vincente Colon, Herbert
Feidler, Richard Hanisch, an
dris Matisons, Roger H. Mey
er, Neal Ratzlaff and Jerry
Reed.
Interning in other states
are Brandon Adams, Charles
Anderson, Phillip Baker, Ed
win Bercovici, Mona Bom
gaars, Doyt Conn, Marshall
Cook, Stanley Davis, Stanley
Deal, Daniel Denenberg,
James Dolan, Richard Dol
bec, Douglas Downey, Ber
nard Feldman, Michael Field,
Keith Garner, Harrison Gill,
John Goldner, John Griffiths
and Leon Handke.
Ronald Hansrote, Henry
William, Calvin Hobel, Gerald
Hoffarth, Marcus Johnson,
Ralph Keill, Gilbert Kloster,
Rodney Larson, Jerry Law
son, Jerry Margolin, Lewis
McCormick, Donald Mcintyre,
Marlene Meyer, Dwight
Richard and Dale Ripe.
James Shapiro, Allen Shu
kert, Jerome and Marilyn
Smith, Kenneth Stormo, Den
nis Weiland and Robert
Wintroub.
Alumnus Selected
Among Top Ten
A University alumnus, Ger
ald Phillippe, now president
of General Electric, is one of
10 outstanding business lead
ers chosen to receive a spe
cial award from Beta Gam
ma Sigma, national business
scholastic society.
Phillippe received his un
dergraduate degree from the
University's College of Bus
ness Administration in 1932
and his master's in 1933.
In 1960 he was awarded an
honorary doctor's degree
from the University. He will
receive the award at Beta
Gamma Sigma's 50th anni
versary meeting April 23, in
Phoenix, Ariz.
NEBRASKAN
WANT ADS
BRIDGE
If you like Bridge, you will like Dupli
cate. Student Union. Mondays. 7:15
p.m. and Sundaya, 2:15 P.m. Entry
S.SO. Free cookies and coffee. Come
alone or bring a partner. Kibiuers
welcome.
ELECTIONS
Vote for "Fiorello" for mayor on March
30th at 8:00 p.m.
AUCTION
The home and furniture of a weU estab
lished brotherhood will be sold to the
highest bidders while they are about
town. Meet me at the corner of 16th
and Vine tonight. Bring flashlight and
cash.
DRINKERS
DRINKERS lessons in Molotov Cocktail
mixing at VIVA ZAPATA! Sat. at
7:30, Union Auditorium.
STATUS SEEKERS get your free
autographed Marlon Brando mumbles
on sp'i- during TEAHOUSE OF THE
UGUS-1 MOON. Teetotalers and In
Jividualists come too!
SUGGESTIONS
fcK suggests "Politics and Poker"
week from Saturday night.
1963 SUMMER SESSIONS ABROAD
University of San Francisco
CUAOALAJARA, Mexico-June H-Aug. t
$;W 00 includes tuition, board 4
room, and activitiat.
VALENCIA, Spain-June 21 - August 21
Several plans to ft individual re
quirements from SMS. 00 including,
tuition, board and room, activiti,
and ROUND-TRIP Y PLANE NEW
YOKK-MADRID VALENCIA.
PALM A da MAUORCA, Spain-July a
August 24
Several plant tc fit Individual re
quirements from StfS.M including
tuition, board and room, activities,
and ROUND-TRIP 6Y PLANE HEW .
YORK-MADRID-PA..MA.
INFORMATION: Dr. Carlos 6. Sanchai
University of San Francisco
Saa Francisco 17, California
Campus
Calendar
TODAY
AG UNION program, Fa
ther Pucelik speaks on Russia,
8:15 p.m.
DUPLICATE BRIDGE, Stu
dent Union, 7:15 p.m.
TOMORROW
AG "Y" meeting, 7 p.m.
AG UNION board meeting,
7:00 p.m.
KNITTING L e s s o n s, Ag
Union Lounge, 4-5:30 p.m.
AWS To Meet
The newly-elected Associ
ated Woman Students Board
will, meet for the first time
at 5 p.m. Tuesday for a ban
quet. Installation of officers
will be held.
Officers in appointive posi
tions will be announced at that
time, according to Jane Ten
hulsen, vice president.
TWIST AGAIN A relaxing service open to the University student through the courtesy RELAX Take Five, a new entertainment program featur
of the Union is Friday afternoon's Jazz and Java. Starting at 4, the hour-long program lng student talent, was recitly initiated on Wednesday
features the music of poplar combos and singing groups. afternoons, by the Union enWrtainment committee.
Why
By JOHN LONNQUIST
Nebraskan Staff Writer
If you've ever tried to find
a seat in the crib at 4 p.m.
on Friday afternoons, you
know how. successful some
of the Student Union's pro
grams are, and how much
fun.
Taking into consideration
all of its functions, the Stu
dent Union, under its man
aging director Al Bennett,
probably does more for the
students than any other
single faction on the cam
pus. " Nearly everyone has a
general idea of the facili
ties available in the union,
but few know exactly what
the union is.
Where did the Student
Union come from? What is
it really for?
In 1936, a group of
students, faculty, and alum
ni, who felt a need for a
broadening of the education
al facilities on the campus,
formed a student union bet
terment committee. This
group created enough inter
est to get the original build
ing built at a total cost of
$900,000. $450,000 was ac
quired from the federal gov
ernment's WPA and the rest
was obtained under a bond
issue paid for out of stu
dent fee subscriptions. The
betterment committee solic
ited enough money from the
University's alums and
from business firms in the
area to pay for the furnish
ings and the fixtures of the
building.
The new addition to the
Union was added in 1956.
It was financed, along with
five or six other campus
innovations by another bond
issue. This issue is b e 1 n g
paid by the students now.
Each semester $11 is tak
en from the tuition of each
student; $6.50 goes to pay
off the bond issue, and the
remainder goes for the op
qerating costs of the build
ing and its many tactions.
The Union is not tax sup
supported. State tax funds,
according x to Al Bennett,
director of the Union, are
historically and logically
not invested in income-producing,
non-academic, stu
dent service enterprises.
The Union, because it has
certain income - producing
programs, comes under this
classification. But making
money is not a purpose of
the Student Union.
The main purpose of the
Union, as stated in 1937, and
restated by the association
of College Unions in 1960,
is to provide a center, with
facilities, in which educa
tional, .cultural, social, and
recreational activities of the
campus community may
take place and to exhibit
standards in all of t h e s e
areas which reflect credit
on the central educational
arm of the academic com
munity. ;
In the opinion of the Uni
versity administration and
the Union Board of Mana
gers, the union provides an
out-of-class scene and plat
form for edu tional op
portunities which don't fit
in a classroom.
Marsh To Debate
Reeves Tuesday
Capital punishment will be
the subject of a debate be
tween two leaders in Nebras
ka government, according to
Sally Miller, of the Union
Forums Committee.
The debate, from 4:30 to
5:30 p.m. tomorrow in 234
Student Union, features Ne
braska's Secretary of State,
Frank Marsh, speaking for
capital punishment, and state
Senator T. C. Reeves, speak
ing against it.
Reeves introduced a b i 1 1
prohibiting capital punish
ment in this session of leg
islature. The bill was indef-
inately postponed by the com
mittee, ana senator Keeves
has not yet moved to place
it on general file.
As Secretary of State, Mr.
Marsh sits on the Board of
Pardons and Paroles.
Henry Grether, professor of
law, will moderate the de
bate. A question and answer
session will follow.
JwL U)f&L L l Uuojv
March 18 through March 24
TUESDAY MARCH 19
Forum on Capital Punishment
Senator T. C. Reeves Pro
Sec. of State Frank Marsh Con
4:30 Room 234
WEDNESDAY MARCH 20
Take 5
Lou Kraus on Trumpet
Sherry Filbert Singing
Film Society
Viridiana Spanish
THURSDAY MARCH 21
Documentary Film
Africa ll Narrated by Edward R. Murrow
4:30 Auditorium
Dinner with the Prof.
5:30 West Cafeteria
FRIDAY MARCH 22
Suite Beat Ray Pheonix from the Purple Piano
4:00 Party Rooms
Weekend Film 7 & 9 Auditorium
SATURDAY MARCH 21
"Saturday Night Special"
Double Feature Show
7:30 Auditorium
Development of skills in
the art of human relations
takes place in living with
people. The Union is the
place In which the type of
activity takes place that, pro
vides a broad cross section
of life experiences on t h e
campus. These are similar
to the experiences which the
well-developed citizen will
encounter when he takes
his place in his chosen seg
ment of society.
Many persons have criti
cized the Union because of
the amount of time which
some students waste within
its waUs. "Any body can
waste his opportunities,"
commented Bennett, a nd
there are plenty of oppor
tunities to waste here. But
the responsible student real
izes the balance between
work and play, and sees
the things which the Union
affords him in expanding
the meaner four years which
he spends here."
The Union offers the stu
dent an exposure to many
extensions of his class
room learning. Here he can
put his classroom know
ledge into actual living
situations, he said.
The student who only sees
the glitter of the crib and
the fun and the games, is
missing out. This student
does not see the problem
solving activities which are
aided by the Union and its
facilities. The Union is open
to Student Council, AUF,
UNICORNS and IFC. These
and similar groups are
learning first-hand how to
deal with the type of prob
lems which they will en
counter in later life, ac
cording to Union officials.
The student is not here
only to sit in the classroom
and study. At home, the
student's parents are con
stantly engaged in the learn
ning process, but at the
same time they are putting
their learning to work, and
are spending some of their
time in relaxing pursuits,
he said. So it should be
with the student. The Union,
according to Bennett, gives
the student his chance.
The student is not here
only to sit in the classroom
and study. At home, the
student's parents are con
stantly engaged in the
learning process, but at the
same time they are putting
their learning to work, and
are spending some of their
time in relaxing pursuits,
he said. So it should be with
the student. The Union,
according to Bennet, gives
the student his chance.
REBIRTH IN CHRIST
Will Be Discus d By
REV. RAWLEY MYERS
sssa
AT THE CATHOLIC NEWMAN CENTER
WED. MARCH 20, AT 8:00 P.M.
THE PUBLIC IS INVITED
JFK tSt
50 milers!
Official
JFK WALKING TEAM
Sweatshirts
Whtthar you'ra RapubHcon or Dem
ocrat -hiker ef plkar sorority, frerlar
nlty, or lndapandant, youH want on
of thata. Naavy black cotton kith with
whita color-fatt laltaring. Sim $, M,
L, XL Satisfaction guaranteed or
morwy refunded. Only $3.98 pottogo
paid. Send check or money order foi
f EVANS TpKIAlTYa.TNC
j 14 E. 15th Street
I Richmond 24. Virginia
I Please rush me ) size ( )
I JFK Walking Team sweatshirts.
Name
Address
I City State
Do you
need me
at
J PL
If you have
an advanced degree,
let' stalk
some more.
You'll be part of a 3500-person facility
responsible for R&D on America's
lunar, planetary, and interplanetary
. explorations. If you come to Caltech's -Jet
Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena,
California, you'll find the finest technical
facilities in the world like the library
with 125,000 technical documents, -the
most sophisticated computers,
space simulators, acres of laboratory
space, and about three support people
for every one of you. And you'll be
working with the finest scientific minds
In the country. If you want to
think hard for 3 living, you should
j think hard about coming to JPL
IHilHllilBl
JET PROPULSION LABORATORY
4B0G Oak OfOve Drrv. Pasodna, California
V
Y
'7
t
1
On Campus Interviews: Contact University Placemen Office for Appointment
March 20, 1963
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