The daily Nebraskan. ([Lincoln, Neb.) 1901-current, December 19, 1962, Page Page 2, Image 2

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Page 2
EDITORIAL
Wednesday, December 19, 1962
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I'M AFAI it's 4ll WE HAV urr FORoti I
OIVE-JF,4y TICKET . . .
It's Yours, If You Want It
A Study of Single Vehicle Fatalities
IN A COUNTY of the eastern United
States, a study was made of all accidents
which resulted in a fatality and did not
involve another vehicle or pedestrian.
Records were kept for over eight years
and it was found that 117 drivers fell into
this catagory. Of these 117, 83 died within
four hours and were tested for blood all
cohol. Of those tested, 41 (49 per cent)
were found to have had blood alcohol
levels of 0.15 per cent or more at death
and an additional 17 (20 per cent) were
found to have levels between 0.05 per
cent and 0.15 per cent.
In order to reach a blood alcohol
level of 0.15 per cent, a 150-pound person
would have to drink the equivalent of 3
ounces of absolute alcohol or 6 ounces of
100 proof liquor.
ON THE BASIS of this study, the re
searchers concluded that the use of al
cohol was probably a causal factor in
one or more of the deaths which resulted
from accidents of this type.
In addition to this study, growing evi
dence on a national level indicates that
as many as 50 per cent of the drivers
and pedestrians killed in traffic accidents
had been drinking alcholic beverages pri
or to the fatal accidents. Notice, no dis
tinction is made for a person who could
be considered drunk. The statistics show
that even one small drink the old "one
for the road" can influence the ability
and reactions of a driver, or pedestrian,
enough to be a causal factor in accidents.
THERE WILL BE many times today
and throughout the rest of the week, as
students pull out for vacation spots, that
the offer will be made to go to a local
"pub" for a quick one with the "broth
ers" or room mates. After all they will
not be seeing each other again for a cou
ple weeks.
Why not wish each other a Merry
Christmas and Happy New Year? If you
do, be sure to pick up your ONE-WAY
TICKET it's yours free of charge. You
will have earned it.
Representative
Explains Motion
To the Editor:
Regarding John Pitts,
Jr., letter (Dec. 17) criti
cizing my motion in t h e
Student Council on Dec. 5,
I am certain that he mis
understood the motion en
tirely. My motion objected to
official action by Univer
sity administrators in the
matter of restrictive
clauses in fraternity and
sorority constitutions.
Secondly, the motion ad
vocated that the Council
endorse voluntary liberal
ization of such restrictive
clauses.
If fraternity chapters
are not willing to comply
with the edicts established
by a majority of their
chapters (many of which
are at Southern univer
sities, admittedly), I see
no other alternative than
to drop their association
with national. Although I
am in principle in favor of
removing such clauses
from the constitutions of
fraternal organizations of
a collegiate relation, great
care must be taken that
traditional freedoms and
privileges are preserved.
Administrative fiat must
not be allowed to flout
such rights.
Sincerely submitted,
Steve Christensen,
Law College
Representative
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ACADEMIC EXPRESSWAY . . .
Sing May Have Raccoon Coat
TONIGHT THE University will hold
its most recent attempt to put a little of
the "old raccoon coat" spirit and tradi
tion back into today's high speed aca
demic life. The University Sing, which
bat received wide support from many
large groups and organizations on cam
pus, will combine the best of college tra
dition with the spirit of the Christmas
season.
Unfortunately the pressures of the
world have made it so there just isn't
much time for raccoon coats anymore.
This was illustrated by the fact that aca
demic considerations superceeded the
sport of football this weekend. In olden
days, school would of been called off so
students could have time to travel to
New York, if the Gotham Bowl was
played then, and school would have been
called off Monday, in celebration of the
team's fine victory. Even three years ago,
after we beat Oklahoma, classes were
officially dismissed in recognition of the
teams effort in being the first team to
knock off the Sooners in many years.
TODAY'S COLLEGE students go to
school all year long if there's room
and study everything from conversational
Tibetan to aerospace engineering. Roth
campus and curriculum are expanding as
never before and the big push is yet to
come.
Even so, University students are try
ing to inject something besides the aca
demic into life here at Nebraska. A little
"oil" for the educational "grind stone."
Sure, the students do things to divert their
attention away from the books, but not
as organized University students. Tradi
tion after tradition has fallen by the way
side of our higher educational express
way. WE HOPE that every University stu
dent, faculty member and administrator
will consider attending tonight's Holiday
Sing. A great deal of combined effort has
gone into organizing it. If the Sing is a
failure this year then you can avoid it
next year so will we. Let's all get to
gether tonight and blend together as a
University. What better time to do this
then when we turn our attention away
from the everyday and think of our fel
low men with a hope for peace in toe
world?
Daily Nebraskan
SEVENTY-SECOND YEAR OF
PUBLICATION
Telepfcen 477-S711, ext 25S8, 2SS9, 2558
Member Asssclated Collegiate Press,
iBtersaticasI Press Representative, Na
tional Advertising Service, Iscerperste.
Pcil-jJwd at: Rora 5L, Stadent Union,
UxiAm s, Nebraska.
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j FOR YOVR INFORMATION
(Public Institutions
Spur Expansions
I by Joint Office of Institutional Research
1 In an effort to prepare for increasing college en-
rollments, publicly controlled institutions spent $404 mil-
lion for construction and rehabilitation projects in fiscal
I 1958-59. Privately controlled institutions spent $222 mil-
I lion in the same period.
I In addition, for the period 1960 to 1965, public insti-
i tutions are planning a 45 percent expansion in instruc-
e tional facilities and a 57 percent expansion in housing
accommodations as compared with 36 percent and 46
I percent for private institutions. A comparison of the
date from public and private institutions indicates that
I the public institutions in 1960-61 were operating more
I nearly to capacity.
These figures are gleaned from three recent U.S.
j Office of Education publications: Progress in the Con-
j struction of Higher Education Facilities, Student Accom-
! modations in Instructional Facilities, and Student Ac-
i commodations in Residential Facilities.
Despite these efforts to expand, however, the U.S.
: Office of Education points out that even if the planned
; growth rate of 41 percent (for public and private in-
; stitutions combined) is realized, the accommodations
! may still be inadequate. Recent projections forecast an
i increase in opening fall enrollment of 44 percent in the
i five-year period.
Close to 1,500 institutions reported spending $585
million on new construction and $41 million for rehabil
itation in 1958-59. This compares with $251 million spent
in 1951-52, indicating that expenditures for new building
! more than trebled during the period under survey. The
j construction study pointed out that cyclical recessions
j bad twice interrupted the accelerating trend and added
j that the rate of acceleration in construction "was not
j sufficient to provide for the facilities needs of enroll-
I ment growth plus obsolescence."
The cost per square foot of all new construction in
! publicly controlled institutions was $18.40, while privately
1 controlled schools spent $20.30 per square foot. Publicly
i controlled institutions leaned most heavily on govern-
I ment sources for funds for instructional, research and
general facilities, with 68.2 percent of the funds for
such construction coming from state, local and federal
j vernment, with state government supplying 63.4 per-
I cent of the total. Private institutions, on the other
i hand, relied largely on gifts and grants for funds for
these facilities, to the extent of 61 percent.
Private institutions, more than their public counter-
I parts, relied on the federal government for housing
funds in the 1958-59 period. Twenty-six percent of the
I private schools' funds for construction of all types came
from Housing and Home Finance Agency revenue bonds,
I compared with 22.6 percent of the public institutions'
i funds in this area.
The study found a trend toward greater use of
! revenue bonds for residential and auxiliary construction
i by both ty pes of institutions, while at the same time
i using less gift and grant funds as a source.
TEN COJmANDEiYTS f
I FOR TRAFFIC SAFETY I
s s
I I Thou shall not murder by motor, f
1 II Thou Khalt not mix alcohol with
gasoline.
III Thou Khalt not exceed speed 1
I linif. I
MRS. U.S. SAVINGS BONDS
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IH 'MRS. AMERICA- CONTEST
MRS. EWLYW&bLL OF ST.
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SAVINGS BONDS OF 1962.
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SHE AISO BOYS
O.S. SAVINGS BONDS
REGULARLY AND
EMCOURAGES HSR
7HREE SMALL SOtfS
72 SAVE AT SCHOOL
MM CS. SAVINGS
STAMPS.
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IV Thou Khalt not follow too
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V Thou shaft not weave from lane f
1 to lane.
VI Thou Khalt not fail to sigaal. j
VII Thou Khalt not loose thy
temper.
VIII Thou .shaft be courteous to thy
I fellow drivers. I
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I IX Thou fchalt honor traffic laws
that thy days may be long.
X Thou Khalt favor the pedestrian.
iSf $250
$195 i 1 1
I "Don't Crash the Christmas Party" I
in diamond for the giH who Ukei to be different. The
tailored, streamlined, quiet beauty of the emerald cut
is in direct contrast to the graceful glitter of the
marqu'ne. The former looks best on a hand of strength J
and character - the Utter on long, tapfrfng fingers. 3
A
Prices include Federal tax Charge or budget j
Jlluttrationt tlightlf tnlarged
SARTOR'S
1200 & o ;