The daily Nebraskan. ([Lincoln, Neb.) 1901-current, September 20, 1962, Page Page 3, Image 3

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    Thursday, September 20, 1962
The Daily Nebraskan
Page 3
Angels Take Flight
First Instructions
Given Residences
The Angel Flight soared
skyward Tuesday night as
representatives from each or
ganized women's residence
met in the Student Union for
initial briefing.
A relatively new national
collegiate organization, Angel
Flight is already successfully
established on 69 campuses
throughout the United States.
Affiliated with the United
States Air Force, and partic
ularly with Arnold Air Soci
ety, Angel Flight on the NU
campus will be mainly a so
cial organization, concentrat
ing on aid in the preparation
and planning of various mili-
Dr. Gallaher
Joins Staff
Dr. Art Gallaher, Jr., a
social anthropologist, joined
the University's staff this
year. The associate professor
will teach community and
social anthropology.
The 37-year-old native Ok
lahoman, a member of the
University of Houston facul
ty since 1956, has had con
siderable research experi
ence. In 1950 and 1951, he as
sisted with an ethnological
survey of the Seminole Freed
men in Oklahoma, with spe
cial emphasis on resistance
to ethnic assimilation and
identification.
Dr. Gallaher was a field
assistant for an Ethnic
Health Survey Project to the
Pima and Apache Reserva
tions in Arizona in 1953.
He also studied the role of
personal corftact in the de
velopment of ethnic attitudes
by an ex-Illinois resident liv
ing in Tucson, Arizona, in
1954. In 1957 he studied the
cultural and social changes
in a rural village in the
Ozarks.
Last year, he was a co
ordinator for the Southern
Regional Council, Inc., a proj
ect surveying occupational op
portunities for Negroes in four
Southern communities.
NEBRASKAN
WANT ADS
POLICY
Classified ads for the Daily
Nebraskan must be entered
two days in advance and must
be paid for in advance. Cor
rections will be made if errors
are brought to our attention
within 48 hours.
RIDES WANTED
Omaha-Lincoln MWF for o'clock, re
turn noon. Or MW p.m. Omaha 980-2317.
ROOMER WANTED
Man wanted to share 2 bedroom apart
ment In College View. Phone 484-0224 after
6:00 p.m.
ROOMERS NEEDED
Itentnf a complete house. Need two more
roommates. Call 42341049 or vijit 2201
South St.
DANCE BANDS
When yoa book a dance band, why not
hook the beat? N.U.'a own Jim Herbert
Orrhentra i back again (or another
awinnn' year Call early to gel the
date you want. Call 4.15-2831.
LOST
tack full of booki miaplared In back
of blue car. Reward. Call HE 2-2084.
Black, horn-rimmed, prescription un
flaanea. (.oat in adminiatralion s2M)
Wrdneaday afternoon. I need 'em: Re
ward. Call 4.12-763 !, ext. 4102.
LITTLE kAN
SPECIAL STUDENT
DISCOUNT
WELCOME BACK TO SCHOOL
MAKE
Kaufman's Jewelers
1332 O
. Your headquarters for better quality
Aulhorted Keeptahe Diamond; LonglneiHulova Watehet
tary events, serving other
campus activities, and in tak
ing part in tours and confer
ences held throughout the
United States.
The first group of Nebras
ka's flight will be selected
next week on the basis of two
short interviews. One inter
view will be with the charter
members of the Flight:
Ruthie Reed, Judi Zadina,
Leah Smith and Sally Dale.
The final interview will be
with a board of Arnold Air
Society members. Each in
terviewing board will also in
clude an advisor to the organ
ization. All women's residences will
be allowed three applications
for membership and mem
bers will be chosen on their
interest, personality, personal
appearance, and their knowl
edge of current world affairs.
Each applicant must be car
rying 12 credit hours, and an
overall grade average of 6.0
must be held by sophomores,
and 5.5 by juniors and seniors.
Freshmen will not be eligible
for membrship. However, they
will be able to serve as work
ers on the various flight activ
ities. Applications must be turned
into the Alpha Omicron Pi or
to the Beta Phi house by 9
a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 25.
Houses will be notified as to
the interviewing dates, and
the Daily Nebraskan will car
ry the individual interviewing
times.
Campus
Calendar
TODAY
DOCUMENTARY FILM
presentation, Student Union
Auditorium, 4:30 p.m.
ALL UNIVERSITY FUND
board meeting, Student Uni
on, 7 p.m.
FRIDAY
CORN COB football rally,
Carillon Tower, 6:30 p.m.
KNUS Dance Party, Pan
Am room, Student Union, 7:30
p.m.
SATURDAY
FOOTBALL. Nebraska vs.
the University of South Da
kota. Memorial Stadium, 2
p.m.
SKY SHOW, "A trip to Ve
nus," Ralph Mueler Plane
tarium, Morrill Hall, 2:45
p.m.
CERES, transparent wom
an, University Health Galler
ies, Morrill Hall basement
10:30 a.m. and 3:45 p.m.
Chatfield Will Change
Freshmen Schedules
Freshman students who find
themselves registered for too
few hours than they intended
should get in touch with Lee
Chatfield, director of the Jun
ior Division, Administration
205.
In extending this invitation,
Chatfield explained that the!
rush of undergraduate regis- j
tration is now over ana some
adjustments may now be pos
sible for Junior Division stu
dents whose programs are un
balanced. ON jMPUS
7
NU Theater
Begins Sale
For Season
Dramas, comedies, operas
and musicals are in store for
University theater goers this
season.
Season tickets are on sale
in the business office of Uni
versity Theater for $5. Five
plays are on tap beginning
Oct. 24.
The plays include:
"The Three Penny Opera,"
by Bertolt Brecht, which is
his version of Gay's "T h e
Beggars Opera." The depart
ment of music will join
forces with the theater for
this production.
"The Visit," by Fredrich
Duerrenmatt is a satirical ap
proach to social life. Richard
Watts Jr, of the New York
PoSt says, "The Visit is an
absorbingly sardonic contem
plation of, a community's ad
vance, and it is surely one
of the most savage drama
tic studies of greed ..."
"Street Scene," an opera
by Kirt Weill has been called
"a perfect marriage of the
ater, music and poetry."
"Squirk," by William Wal
den won the University's Bal
lard Playwriting Contest last
year. The play is centered
around a young advertizing
executive who is plunged into
situations where black is
white, nothing has sharp
edges and his basic beliefs
are shaken.
The theater's annual
Shakespeare play is "Much
Ado About Nothing" a
comedy of wit and manners
which gave the world one of
its most famous love duels.
Theater officials also re
mind students, as well as Lin
coln residents, of the Labora
tory and experimental the
ater programs which are
free. These plays are di
rected by speech majors at
the University.
E. F. Ross Heads
Hospitals, Clinics
Edwin F. Ross is the new
administrator of the Univer
sity Hospital and Clinics.
Since 1953 he has served
as assistant director of the
University Hospitals of Cleve
land, Ohio, an eight-unit med
ical center affiliated with the
Western Reserve University
School of Medicine. From
1949-53 he was administrator
of the Doctors Hospital in
Cleveland Heights, Ohio.
The author of a number of
articles in the field of hospital
administration, Ross has
served as committee chair
man for both the Cleveland
Hospital Council and the Ohio
Hospital Association.
oome
Things
tojjave
Qiround
fig
A Utility Ball Pen,
The n m
If BM
A good practical pen
for everyone..
Everybody like
the LINDY.
It writes nice.
Lots of students buy two
or three at a time.
Maybe because only 39.
Maybe because there are twelve
brilliant Ink colors.
Or maybe they just like to have
two or threw or twelve around.
Also Hire to have around:
uxvrwrumD at um m tin..
f t
TtMO-FEN 4r u-
r.i.t. tmm MM
' The Mcntary
crlary.
VtHTCffi's MM t' 49
jt Fine for (It fl(WM)
jrgp auditors.
UMLCOmKN f
letractsM.
periMMfit ImprtMle.
tmut sjf $1-50
9.1-
ItotractaMt.
tmootti partormer .
Pointing and Viewing
(Continued from Page 2)
doubts were allayed by the adoption of the 15th Amend
ment to the Constitution. It provides:
"The right of citizens of the United States to vote
shall not be denied or abridged by the United
States or by any State on account of race, color,
or previous condition of servitude."
So far, the American Negro mostly likely the de
scended of those very slaves freed nearly 100 years ago
is still not a first-class citizen.
He can vote in some places, to be sure. He can eat
at any lunch counter and sit where he pleases on buses,
trains and airplanes in some places. He is even able
to go to formerly all-white schools in some places,
both North and South.
He is on iiis way toward full equality, but it is still
a long ways away. Part of that way is blocked by housing
discrimination. You scoff? Look around you. Lincoln has
(in practice, if not theory) at least two distinct Negro
ghettoes.
To break the pattern, through the legal and moral
force of the federal government, Kennedy promised to
use his pen. So far he has not.
Roy Wilkins wishes the President would take pen in
hand. The executive secretary of the NAACP concedes,
according to Newsweek, that the administration "has
proceeded well so far in virtually every other area of
civil rights, but he added: 'He (the President) has got
himself into a jam on this one (discrimination in housing).
He made a clear-cut statement during the campaign;
he said the President should and could extend equal op
portunity to federally aided housing by the stroke of a
pen. His failure to act stands out like a sore thumb. The
natural is: Where the hell is the pen? "
Wilkins has a point. This Saturday will bear watch
ing. The President may end his procrastination and ad
vance equality one more step.
North Platte
Annual Fall
The 33rd annual Fall Feed
ers Day, hosted by the Uni
versity's North Platte Exper
iment Station, will he held
here Sept. 27.
The program will begin at
10:30 a.m. with a tour of cat
tle being used in various
studies, according to Supt.
James C. Adams.
The afternoon program be
gins at 1:15 with a report
of results in dairy cattle
studies by Dr. Mogens M.
Plum, member of the De
partment of Dairy Husban
dry at the University.
Dr. John VaUentine, new
University Extension Range
management specialist at the
Get it with a
U1BMISEE&JHERe I I LAST VEAR H(S BiRTHOW I I NEXT VEAR HIS BlRTHDAV I I ( B0t, TALK AB0IT A 5
BEETHOVEN' CAME ON A SATURDAY... COMES ON A MONDAY... ' - yjWEJfcD GW! J l
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Station Hosts
Feeders Day
station, will discuss "Range
Management and Its Rela
tionship to the Livestock In
dustry. Dr. Robert Koch, chair
man of the Department of
Animal Husbandry will out
line "Nebraska's Livestock
Future."
The program will conclude
with a talk by Dr. Marvel
Baker, who just returned
from a two-year assignment
with the University's Turkish
program. His topic will be:
"The Tools of Progress and
Their Use." There also will
be a question and answer
period at the end of the program.
The
most talked about
book
on campus
FIRST NATIONAL BANK and TRUST COMPANY
PAYC CHECKING ACCOUNT
Any amount opens your account
No minimum balance required
20 checks for only $2.00
Each check personalized with
your name and code number
Regular statements of account
at no charge
A First National Bank PAYC checking account will help keep your
persohal finances in order give you an accurate record of your college
expenses provide proof of bills you've paid. Don't wait . . . open your
account today at Lincoln's Full Service Bank
FIRST NATIONAL BANK v
& TRUST COMPANY OF LINCOLN pti
Downtown at 12th & N Drive-In at 13th & L
Member: FDXC.
Emerson College Opens
With Emphasis on Man
England, today will witness
the opening of a two-year
graduate school named Em
erson College.
The aim of the college is
to bring to mature students,
who have already specialized
in diverse fields, a unifying
concept and experience of
man.
Located in Worchestershire,
the college was founded by
nine Englishmen but named
after American thinker Ralph
Waldo Emerson. The found
ers propose to counterbalance
one-sided specialization by
Emerson College in studies
focused on man, in the be
lief that in man alone all
diversities of human knowl
edge find their common cen
ter and source.
In the first year the cur
riculum includes basic stud
ies on the nature of thinking,
on history as an expression
of evolving consciousness,
and on man as the determin
ing factor in evolution.
Practice in the arts is fun
damental to the curriculum.
For the benefit of students
who can spend only one year
at Emerson College, the
first-year course is planned
as a self-contained unit.
After having gained a new
approach to the human being
both in his totality and mani
foldness, the student who
continues at Emerson Col
lege will have an opportunity
to do practical work in a
branch of study or field of
activity in which he seeks
training.
The college has four
schools: formal programs in
education, the science and
art of color, nutrition, and
crafts.
If a student has interests
beyond the scope of the
schools, the college will ar
range for him a program of
study at other training cen
ters in England.
At the conclusion of the
two-year course, Emerson
Handnome wallet-size
checkbook cover
No activity or special charges
Spoiled checks replaced free
Easy way to pay bills . . . maintain
a budget
Free Bank-By-Mail forms
College will assist students
in finding employment in 17
countries of the western
world.
A catalogue of Emerson
College may be obtained
from the Corresponding Sec
retary for North American,
F. Blanche Rosse, 320 West
56th Street, Apt. 3A, New
York 19, New York.
Activities Meeting
A meeting of activity
chairmen from all women's
living units will be held to
night at 7 p.m. in 348 Stu
dent Union. Sponsored by
the Innocents and Mortar
Boards, the meeting will
feature a discussion of
plans for an activities orien
tation for freshmen women.
If chairmen cannot attend,
their assistants are urged
to come.
Religious
Activities
WESLEY FOUNDATION
fUm "The Prisoner" at 6:15
p.m. Sunday. Pot luck supper
at 5 p.m. and vespers at 6
p.m.
UNITED CAMPUS CHRIS
TIAN FELLOWSHIP supper
Sunday at 5:30 p.m. with a
forum at 6:30 p.m.
LUTHERAN MISSOURI
SYNOD CHAPEL picnic at
5:30 p.m. Friday for members
of Gamma Delta (Lutheran
Student Organization).
LUTHERAN STUDENT
HOUSE open house after the
football game Saturday. Be
ginning this fall a discussion
group will be held after Sun
day morning services at 11:30
a.m. Lutheran Student Associ
ation supper Sunday at 5:30
p.m.
NEWMAN CLUB Sunday
night supper at 5:30 p.m.
itam
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